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I have this code:

GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(array, GCHandleType.Pinned);
try
{
    IntPtr pointer = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
}
finally
{
    if (handle.IsAllocated)
    {
        handle.Free();
    }
}

and then there is this:

unsafe
{
  fixed (int* pArray = array)
  {
    IntPtr intPtr = new IntPtr((void *) pArray);
  }
}

What is quicker and less memory consuming? What is the advisory method to use please?

ADDITIONAL:

I am calling an OpenCV DLL from C#...

  public  byte[] ToJpegData(int qua)
  {
      byte[] data = null;
      int[] p = new int[3];
      p[0] = 1;
      p[1] = qua;// desired_quality_value;
      p[2] = 0;

      GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(p, GCHandleType.Pinned);
      try
      {
          IntPtr quality = handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();


          //IntPtr quality = new IntPtr(p);
          IntPtr mat = CvInvoke.cvEncodeImage(".jpg", Ptr, quality);// IntPtr.Zero);


          MCvMat cvMat = (MCvMat)Marshal.PtrToStructure(mat, typeof(MCvMat));
          data = new byte[cvMat.rows * cvMat.cols];
          Marshal.Copy(cvMat.data, data, 0, data.Length);
          CvInvoke.cvReleaseMat(ref mat);


      }
      finally
      {
          if (handle.IsAllocated)
          {
              handle.Free();
          }
      }

      return data;
  }
share|improve this question
5  
The code does nothing anyway. You're pinning an object for no apparent reason. Besides, profile it. –  Simon Whitehead May 1 '14 at 6:07
    
Hi, there is actually more code that DOES do something with the pinned object. My question was related to performance and preferred method which is why I did not include it. –  Andrew Simpson May 1 '14 at 6:11
1  
@closer - perhaps you can be more specific WHY it does not conform rather than you got out of bed the wrong way? –  Andrew Simpson May 1 '14 at 6:13
1  
One important reason to prefer GCHandle is that it doesn't require unsafe blocks and /unsafe compilation flag. Regarding performance - just make profiling, I guess that the difference is not significant. –  Alex Farber May 1 '14 at 6:27
1  
One more thing: you can use Marshal.AllocHGlobal for p array and work without pinning. Allocate and fill it once, since it always contains the same information. –  Alex Farber May 1 '14 at 6:33

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