Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thought fsync() does fflush() internally so using fsync() on a stream is OK. But i am getting unexpected result when executed under network I/O.

My code snippet:

  FILE* fp = fopen(file,"wb");    
   /* multiple fputs() call like: */   
   fputs(buf, fp);   
   ...   
   ...   
   fputs(buf.c_str(), fp);   
   /* get fd of the FILE pointer */   
   fd = fileno(fp);   
   #ifndef WIN32   
   ret = fsync(fd);   
   #else   
   ret = _commit(fd);   
   fclose(fp);   

But it seems _commit() is not flushing the data (i tried on Windows and the data was written on Linux exported filesystem).

When i changed the code as:

 FILE* fp = fopen(file,"wb");   
   /* multiple fputs() call like: */   
   fputs(buf, fp);   
   ...   
   ...   
   fputs(buf.c_str(), fp);   
   /* fflush the data */   
   fflush(fp);   
   fclose(fp);    

This time it flushes the data.

I am wondering if _commit() does the same thing as fflush(). Any inputs?

share|improve this question
    
What is the problem you were seeing with the first example? –  rogerdpack Nov 8 '12 at 0:16
1  
@rogerdpack in first example, writing to stream through fputs() is not synching / committing to disk even if calling _commit() function on the fd (file descriptor). This test was done under cluster system where the remote linux filesystem is exported as CIFS and used on Windows machine and node failover is tested during write. When node recovers it has been found that file size is zero. –  Adil Nov 9 '12 at 12:26
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 26 down vote accepted

fflush() works on FILE* , it just flushes the internal buffers in the FILE* of your application out to the OS.

fsync works on a lower level, it tells the OS to flush its buffers to the physical media.

OSs heavily caches data you write to a file. If the OS enforced every write to hit the drive, things would be very slow. fsync(among other things) allows you to control when the data should hit the drive.

Furthermore, fsync/commit works on a file descriptor. It has no knowledge of a FILE* and can't flush its buffers. FILE* lives in your application, file descriptors lives in the OS kernel, typically.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks i was thinking on the same line. So if we are using FILE* then the same can be achieved by fflush() followed by fsync(). –  Adil Feb 26 '10 at 9:48
    
No, because you cannot fsync a FILE*. –  patrickvacek Mar 26 at 16:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.