Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I would to initialize a const int member (numGrids) of my class TestCase when I construct a TestCase. It needs to be const (I think) because it defines the elements of another array member of the classwhich I would also like to initialize when I create a TestCase. The code is shown below:

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

//TestCase.h

class TestCase

{

protected:

    const int numGrids;

    Grid meshes[numGrids];

public:

    TestCase(const int);

};


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

//TestCases.cpp

TestCase::TestCase(const int numGridsSpec)

{
    numGrids = numGridsSpec;

    Grid grids[numGrids];

}

I cannot seem to initialize the const member of my class. I need that member to be constant because it defines the array size of meshes. I get the following errors:

[ 12%] Building CXX object sources/CMakeFiles/GridRefinementStudy.dir/TestCase.cpp.o
In file included from /home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp:16:0:

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.h:5:12: error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘TestCase::numGrids’

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.h:6:14: error: from this location

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.h:6:22: error: array bound is not an integer constant before ‘]’ token

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp: In constructor ‘TestCase::TestCase(int)’:

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp:25:1: error: uninitialized member ‘TestCase::numGrids’ with ‘const’ type ‘const int’ [-fpermissive]

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp:28:13: error: assignment of read-only member ‘TestCase::numGrids’

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp:29:21: error: no matching function for call to ‘Grid::Grid()’

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/TestCase.cpp:29:21: note: candidates are:

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/Grid.h:13:2: note: Grid::Grid(int, int, double, double)

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/Grid.h:13:2: note:   candidate expects 4 arguments, 0 provided

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/Grid.h:1:7: note: Grid::Grid(const Grid&)

/home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources/Grid.h:1:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided

make[2]: *** [sources/CMakeFiles/GridRefinementStudy.dir/TestCase.cpp.o] Error 1

make[1]: *** [sources/CMakeFiles/GridRefinementStudy.dir/all] Error 2

make: *** [all] Error 2
share|improve this question
    
Array sizes have to be compile-time constant expressions. You either want std::vector or std::array. – Kerrek SB May 1 '14 at 11:24
    
You need initializer list to initialize constant. And I would suggest to change the array to std::vector. – Mohit Jain May 1 '14 at 11:24
    
Edit your code properly please! I started, leaving the rest for you ... – πάντα ῥεῖ May 1 '14 at 11:26
1  
@KerrekSB He'll need a compile time constant for std::array too. – James Kanze May 1 '14 at 11:28
    
One (possibly ugly) solution would be to pass size_t numGrids as template argument as OP believes size of array is known at compile time. – Mohit Jain May 1 '14 at 11:48

In pre-C++11, there are four ways of initializing a member:

  • If the member is static, const and has an integral type, it can be initialized directly in the class definition. In this case, the member is a "integral constant expression", and can be used anywhere the compiler requires such (e.g. array dimensions, template argument, etc.).

  • If the member is static, it must be initialized in its definition. If the member is also const, it is a constant expression in the translation unit which contains the definition, after the definition.

  • Any member can be initialized in the initializer list, and typically, all should be (but there are exceptions). Non-static const members must be initialized here (but non-static const members are not constant expressions, and cannot be used as such).

  • Finally, non-const members can be "initialized" in the constructor body. Formally, this is assignment, not initialization, and if the member type has a user defined constructor, it will still be initialized (using the default constructor) in the initialization list. For primitive types, the member remains uninitialized if it isn't mentionned in the initializer list, until it is first assigned.

In your case, it would appear that you want an array whose size is defined by a parameter to the constructor. This is not possible; the size of an array must be an integral constant expression. If the size should always be the same, then you can use a static const int to define it:

class TestClass
{
    static int const numGrids = 25;
    Grid meshes[numGrids];
    //  ...
};

Otherwise, you'll have to use:

class TestClass
{
    std::vector<Grid> meshes;
public:
    TestClass( int size ) : meshes( size ) {}
};

This might be the better solution anyway.

share|improve this answer

You may not do such a way. The size of the array shall be known at compile time. In fact you are trying to get a variable length array. C++ does not have such a feature. Take into account that if the sizes of the array are different for two objects then the classes that define them are different types. They have different data members that is arrays with different sizes. The size of a class shall be the same for each object of that class. I would suggest to use standard container std::dynarray if the compiler supports it or std::vector

On the other hand you could define your class as a template class. For example

template <size_t numGrids>
class TestCase {

protected:


Grid meshes[numGrids];

//...

or even as

template <size_t numGrids>
class TestCase {

protected:


std::array<Grid, numGrids> meshes;

//...

I think that using a template class is the best approach in your case.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but would the array size not be known at compile time when I create a TestCase in main and specify a const value for it. The class would have a variable size depending on how I initialize. I should mention that I'm an amateur programmer. – Omar May 1 '14 at 11:32
    
@user3592458 I do not see sense in this approach because as I understood you want to define objects of the class with different array sizes. – Vlad from Moscow May 1 '14 at 11:34
    
@user3592458 If the size of the array is different for various objects then the classes that define them are also different types. So I advice to use a template class. – Vlad from Moscow May 1 '14 at 11:36

First of all since numGrids is const in the class declaration, you can only initialize it through initialization list.

TestCase::TestCase(const int numGridsSpec)
  :numGrids(numGridsSpec)   // this is the initialization list
{
... 
}

This is simply because a constant variable can only be set to a value once and can not be modified 'legally' thereafter, compilers normally would not allow you to proceed avoiding unexpected consequences in this case.

share|improve this answer

There's a mistake in your code. The array size is dynamic (a variable). You can't use a variable to declare an array size at compile time. Use some constants with real value.

To Answer your question

Initializer list is used to init the data for a const. Something as follows.

class TestCase {

    protected:
        const int numGrids;    

    public:

        TestCase(const int x) : numGrids(x)
        {
        }
};

Solution for your problem

class TestCase {

    protected:

        const int numGrids;
        Grid* pMeshes;

    public:

        TestCase(const int x) : numGrids(x)
        {
            pMeshes = new Grid[x];
        }

        ~TestCase() : numGrids(x)
        {
            delete []pMeshes; // release allocated memory in destructor
        }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    TestCase t(10);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I tried to edit my .cpp file as follows: // Constructor for steady TestCase TestCase::TestCase(const int numGridsSpec) :numGrids(numGridsSpec) { cout << "Hurray!" << endl; } I left the .h the same. errors now: /home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources /TestCase.h:5:12: error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘TestCase::numGrids’ /home/omar/Documents/Programming/C++/FCFD/Current/sources /TestCase.h:6:14: error: from this location ../TestCase.h:6:22: error: array bound is not an integer constant before ‘]’ token – Omar May 1 '14 at 11:39
    
Updated answer. – sarat May 2 '14 at 14:23

If your compiler supports c++11, you could simply do:

class TestCase

{

protected:

    const int numGrids = 25;

    Grid meshes[numGrids];

public:

    TestCase(const int);

};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.