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When I teach introductory computer science courses, I like to lighten the mood with some humor. Having a sense of fun about the material makes it less frustrating and more memorable, and it's even motivating if the joke requires some technical understanding to 'get it'!

I'll start off with a couple of my favorites:

Q: How do you tell an introverted computer scientist from an extroverted computer scientist?

A: An extroverted computer scientist looks at your shoes when he talks to you.

And the classic:

Q: Why do programmers always mix up Halloween and Christmas?

A: Because Oct 31 == Dec 25!

I'm always looking for more of these, and I can't think of a better group of people to ask. What are your best programmer/computer science/programming jokes?

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146  
hahaha I understand now Octal 31 is equal to Decimal 25 –  Jader Dias Dec 28 '08 at 19:36
1  
This question has lived a useful life. It now has so many answers that people aren't reading them all before contributing their answer, leading to many, many duplicates. Voting for close, let it go the way of all the bits... –  Adam Davis Feb 6 '09 at 0:52
1  
When this question got closed, another one just like it got opened: stackoverflow.com/questions/17512/…. It's obvious that people like reading and posting jokes, so I vote for keeping it open (and closing the other one as exact duplicate). –  Sandman Mar 12 '09 at 1:10
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locked by NullUserException Oct 12 '12 at 22:43

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

460 Answers

If the box says, "This software requires Windows XP or better," does that mean it'll run on linux?

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4  
It means you can't run it on Vista (It's not better than XP). You can usually run it on Linux using Wine. –  Osama ALASSIRY Oct 29 '08 at 5:20
20  
No. It's an exclusive or. It runs in XP, therefore it won't run in "better". So Linux won't run it. :) (unless Wine says so) –  luiscubal Feb 21 '09 at 18:45
5  
@luiscubal: LOL! Someone passed his Logic course with flying colors! –  Adam Liss Feb 22 '09 at 23:02
3  
@luiscubal: That depends on operator precedence. Does "requires" come before or after "or"? –  RMorrisey Oct 27 '09 at 23:47
1  
Answer: Depends. Wine might support it. Person asking question: So if I drink, it will look like it works? –  Biosci3c Oct 21 '10 at 5:09
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There's still nothing that beats this in describing obvious pitfalls and making you laugh:

Each stakeholders dirty secret in development

Update: it looks like there's an entire site around these: Project Cartoon

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Q: What is the difference between a programmer and a non-programmer ?

A: The non-programmer thinks a kilobyte is 1000 bytes while a programmer is convinced that a kilometer is 1024 meters

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1  
He got it right, and I laughed out loud. –  takua108 Dec 13 '08 at 7:06
13  
do you mean a kibibyte or a kilobyte? –  Jeremy Salwen Aug 16 '09 at 0:25
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Two threads walk into a bar. The barkeeper looks up and yells, "hey, I want don't any conditions race like time last!"

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1  
This great is one! ;) –  Nelson Reis Dec 29 '08 at 13:56
19  
I was thinking, "Man, your grammar is totally off."... Silly me. :) Nice one. –  Eddie Parker Apr 2 '09 at 23:32
7  
Is it strange that I read that sentence as exactly as it should be and didn't notice the lack of grammar till I read the comments? –  Stephan Aug 19 '09 at 14:57
1  
strange doesn't even begin to describe you. –  Anonymous Type Aug 24 '10 at 3:59
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A programmer is sent to the grocery store with instructions to "buy butter and see whether they have eggs, if they do, then buy 10."

Returning with 10 butters, the programmer says, "they had eggs."

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101  
shouldnt he have ended up with 11? –  Svish Feb 23 '09 at 23:45
8  
10 butters makes more sense than 10 eggs. I've only seen eggs in cartons of 12 around here. –  epochwolf May 19 '09 at 20:56
1  
11 ? no... if eggs are found replace buy butter with buy 10 butters. it's an if condition : either you buy butter and you buy 10 –  Philippe Carriere Sep 19 '09 at 6:40
12  
@epochwolf - The store uses base 12 –  Omar Oct 4 '09 at 9:03
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Old C programmers don't die, they're just cast into void.

If you listen to a UNIX shell, can you hear the C?

Vi, vi, vi - the editor of the beast.

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17  
vi, vi, vi - the editor of the beast! yep.. that's right :) (ps: i love vi) –  Lucas Gabriel Sánchez Mar 22 '09 at 15:45
8  
and C# (or Java) programmers don't die either, they are garbage collected :) –  Thomas Levesque Feb 6 '10 at 1:45
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Eight bytes walk into a bar. The bartender asks, “Can I get you anything?”

“Yeah,” reply the bytes. “Make us a double.”

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6  
I spent my last vote of the day upvoting this :) –  Hooray Im Helping Nov 4 '09 at 3:37
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If Java is the answer, it must have been a really verbose question.

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41  
The question was "What would a vaguely adequate language look like?" –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 10 '09 at 23:32
9  
Yes, thinking of Java as an adequate language is quite a good joke, Earwicker. ;) –  Eddie Parker Apr 2 '09 at 23:20
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what do Computer Science students use for birth control?

Their personalities.

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2  
It's true!! Why are you laughing? –  hasenj May 18 '09 at 21:05
2  
My wife liked this one the best. –  Rob Elliott Jul 23 '09 at 23:05
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OK. Here's one I actually wrote myself about 15 years ago. It's archived online at Adapower. Be gentle:

////////////////////////////

I run across these lists everywhere. Unfortunately, they all seem to have been done by some brain-damaged soul who thinks C is a "normal" language. So I have made an attempt to come up with a new list that is a little more accurate, at least where I sit.

Ada : You aim at your foot and pull the trigger, but the safety stops the gun from firing. The safety won't budge until you tag your foot with a sign reading "Bullet Hole in this foot", and call the paramedics. You do so, then shoot yourself in the foot.

C : The gun comes in 38 pieces, with a set of assembly instructions. After painstakingly assembling the pieces, you pull the trigger and the gun promptly backfires and blows your head off.

Assembly : The same as C, except you have to hand-machine all the pieces as well. When you pull the trigger, your whole house explodes.

Java: You break into someone else's home and steal their water pistol. You then make a child gun that uses .38 rounds instead of water. When you pull the trigger on the child gun, nothing happens to you, but everyone who visits your house gets shot in the foot.

Basic : You aim the gun at a straight horizontal and pull the trigger, which causes a stream of water to be squirted straight down onto your foot.

Perl : You aim the gun at your foot and pull the trigger. There is no explosion, but gravity causes the bullet to slide out of the barrel and bounce off your foot.

Lisp : You do a small part of the remaining work involved in shooting yourself in the foot. You then call yourself, and tell yourself to shoot yourself in the foot.

Pascal : The same as Ada, except when you pull the trigger a little sign pops out reading "BANG!".

C++ : The same as Java, except you try to build the parent water pistol using the gun tools from the C gun. When you pull the trigger on the child gun, the parent C gun explodes, spraying water everywhere, including the chamber of the child gun. This causes the child gun to backfire, blowing your head off.

Visual C++ : The same as C++, except that the bullets, the gun parts, the tools you use to put it together, the hospital you get taken to afterwards, and the ambulance that takes you there are all owned by the same company.

APL : Whenever you pull the trigger, no matter where you aim the gun, the bullet ricochets off of 13 objects and lodges in your foot. The gun has been examined by ballistics experts, mechanical engineers, and even the person who made it, and none of them can figure out how it works.

FORTRAN : When you aim the gun at your foot and pull the trigger, a table indexing error causes the gun to shoot its firing pin into your foot instead of the bullet.


In the year since I posted this, the comments have grown to the point where I think they are as valuable as my original answer. Currently there are comments proposing entries for the following languages:

  • Actionscript
  • Applescript
  • Bash
  • C# (2)
  • Erlang
  • INTERCAL
  • Java script
  • Objective-C / Smalltalk
  • PHP
  • Python (5)
  • Ruby
  • SQL
  • TCL
  • Visual Basic

There are also two alternate entries for Perl, and one for C++

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29  
Python: There is only one type of gun, it is gold plated, very comfortable to hold, and has instructions engraved on it, but for some reason when you pull the trigger it acts exactly like the C gun. –  akdom Oct 25 '08 at 4:03
10  
Erlang : you can use 100 guns to shoot one hole in your foot (it's faster, and if some guns fail you still get the hole). –  Osama ALASSIRY Oct 29 '08 at 4:59
65  
@CAD bloke - I read it to my wife. I got to LISP before she took her clothes off to make me stop reading. –  Guge Dec 2 '08 at 22:40
20  
Perl: There are many different ways to shoot yourself in the foot, many of which only take half a second. Two weeks later, when asked about it, you cannot explain how it happened. –  IfLoop Feb 22 '09 at 4:32
29  
SQL: Pulling the trigger seems to take forever until you spend a good long time understanding how to join bullets with feet. –  IfLoop Feb 22 '09 at 4:39
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I know, not programmers, but most of us may get it...

An infinite number of mathematicians walk into a bar.

The first orders a beer, the second orders half a beer, the third orders a quarter of a beer, the fourth an eighth, and so on.

The bartender looks at the line going out the door,turns to the line and says "you guys suck!".

Then he pours two beers and walks away.

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10  
Ilya: Barmen often don't know how to add something that seems to be infinite. The solution to such a problem is s = (a1)/(1-k). Where a1 is the first number, and k is the constant rate of increase or decrease. k<1 means convergence, so you get s = (1)/(1-0,5) = 2 (If I'm not mistaken) –  Jonta Mar 24 '09 at 15:32
20  
Man, this is awesome. "An infinite number of mathematicians walk into a bar" should be like..a slogan for something. –  dr Hannibal Lecter May 15 '09 at 8:14
19  
Technically, the bartender gave them more than they asked for. –  Cuga Jun 10 '09 at 18:13
17  
@Cuga - Nope, he has just enough beer for all infinity of them. –  kenj0418 Jun 22 '09 at 20:40
10  
@Gert: there is no last guy –  SnOrfus Aug 16 '09 at 7:14
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Why doesn't C++ have a garbage collector?

Because there would be nothing left!

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12  
I'd say that if the GC in Java worked correctly, most Java programs would disappear. –  Lars D Nov 15 '09 at 8:11
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Smith & Wesson - the original "point and click" interface.

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11  
... the results are also quite graphical when the system is loaded –  KaptajnKold Oct 19 '09 at 9:34
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The First Poem Written for Computers

        <>!*''#
        ^"`$$-
        !*=@$_
        %*<>~4
        &[]../
        |{,,SYSTEM HALTED

For you somewhat cybernetically challenged, it goes something like this (using the proper cyber-names):

    Waka waka bang splat tick tick hash,
    Caret quote back-tick dollar dollar dash,
    Bang splat equal at dollar under-score,
    Percent splat waka waka tilde number four,
    Ampersand bracket bracket dot dot slash,
    Vertical-bar curly-bracket comma comma CRASH

From http://www.cise.ufl.edu/~ddd/poem.htm

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1  
Open-Bracket dot capital-Y dot Close-Bracket –  Angel.King.47 Jul 30 '09 at 7:23
5  
+1 because those names are absolutely ridiculous –  David Z Jul 31 '09 at 17:17
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Why are Assembly programmers always soaking wet? They work below C-level.

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3  
This one is nice, but then again I like puns. –  Nixuz Feb 8 '09 at 10:45
2  
This is so first grade! –  harpo Jun 5 '09 at 23:01
14  
@harpo: You did assembly in first grade? –  Michael Myers Jul 24 '09 at 19:50
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"Java programming is like teenage sex ....

  • Everyone talks about it all of the time (but they don't really know what they're talking about);

  • Everyone claims to be doing it;

  • Everyone thinks everyone else is doing it;

  • Those few who are actually doing it:

    • Are not practicing it safely;

    • Are doing it poorly, and

    • Are sure it will be better next time."

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"In theory, there ought to be no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is."

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6  
The difference between theory and practice is greater in practice than it is in theory. –  Istvan Chung Jul 26 '10 at 19:57
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Nothing seems hard to the people who don't know what they're talking about.

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32  
that's more tragic than fun –  Hugo Oct 29 '08 at 3:42
2  
And nothing is impossible for the person who doesn't have to do it themselves... –  Yuval Aug 15 '09 at 21:57
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A Microsoft dev is walking down a walking path on campus when he hears a frog say, "If you kiss me, I will turn into a beautiful woman. We can get married, and I will be your loving wife forever". The geek and the frog stare at each other for a bit, and then he picks up the frog and gently places her in his front pocket. The frog sticks her head out and says "aren't you going to kiss me?"

"No" says the dev, "I work for Microsoft, I don't have time for a wife - but a talking frog is really cool!"

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19  
If it's cool, it's an iFrog. –  Franz Nov 19 '09 at 1:05
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Your mommas so fat that not even Dijkstra is able to find a shortest path around her.

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11  
+1 for getting a your mom joke in there –  ojblass Jun 1 '09 at 1:39
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C++ - where your friends have access to your private members.

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2  
ahem... "C++, where your friends can touch your private parts" –  James Curran Oct 26 '08 at 18:06
4  
what about your "private members"? LOL –  ugasoft Jan 16 '09 at 14:40
48  
A better version - C++ is a modern language where your parent can't touch your privates but your friends can! –  LiraNuna Feb 22 '09 at 19:28
16  
@LiraNuna, Nor can your children. Unless you're protected. =] –  strager Feb 22 '09 at 19:32
1  
I'd just shorten it to "privates". –  Groxx May 20 '09 at 1:15
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I am surprised this one has not already been posted. I guess I will do the honors. :)

alt text

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11  
Comic sans? No! –  Nitrodist Jul 9 '10 at 4:53
1  
We are supposed to post jokes here, not descriptions how this work in real life :-) –  Gorgen Sep 10 '10 at 9:38
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A good programmer is someone who looks both ways before crossing a one-way street. ~ Doug Linder

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12  
true, not a joke... –  Catalin DICU Aug 17 '09 at 13:14
3  
I catch myself doing that. –  Ikke Oct 15 '09 at 8:52
37  
A user could always drive the wrong way. –  Danny Varod Oct 18 '09 at 20:51
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Intelligent Design Sort

Introduction

Intelligent design sort is a sorting algorithm based on the theory of intelligent design.

Algorithm Description

The probability of the original input list being in the exact order it's in is 1/(n!). There is such a small likelihood of this that it's clearly absurd to say that this happened by chance, so it must have been consciously put in that order by an intelligent Sorter. Therefore it's safe to assume that it's already optimally Sorted in some way that transcends our naïve mortal understanding of "ascending order". Any attempt to change that order to conform to our own preconceptions would actually make it less sorted.

Analysis

This algorithm is constant in time, and sorts the list in-place, requiring no additional memory at all. In fact, it doesn't even require any of that suspicious technological computer stuff. Praise the Sorter!

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10  
Hmm, I thought this was just supposed to be a joke. –  fbinder May 25 '09 at 12:47
2  
@fbinder: Someone didn't get it. <subtle gesture in Josh's direction> –  gnovice Jun 3 '09 at 20:48
3  
@gnovice - It is O(1). Big-O notation does not take into account the actual time for the algorithm to do it's dirty work - just how the algorithm scales, so O(1) is constant - it takes the same amount of time for all inputs and O(n) takes twice as long for double-sized inputs. The point is that an O(n) algorithm can be faster than an O(1) one for some inputs, because the O(n) one might be "quick-and-dirty" and the O(1) might jump through some hoops. There is still a constant multiplier for time, and in this case, that multiplier would be 0. –  Chris Lutz Jul 21 '09 at 9:23
5  
Chris is technically right, but considering the context, I like O(0) –  David Z Jul 31 '09 at 17:22
3  
@fbinder: The trick is, it's only as much a joke as intelligent design itself... –  Ilari Kajaste Sep 10 '09 at 9:42
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Sorry, this one is quite huge, got as mail from a friend

The Evolution of a Programmer


High School/Jr.High

   10 PRINT "HELLO WORLD"
   20 END


First year in College

   program Hello(input, output)
     begin
       writeln('Hello World')
     end.


Senior year in College

   (defun hello
     (print
       (cons 'Hello (list 'World))))


New professional

   #include 
   void main(void)
   {
     char *message[] = {"Hello ", "World"};
     int i;

     for(i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
       printf("%s", message[i]);
     printf("\n");
   }


Seasoned professional

   #include 
   #include 

   class string
   {
   private:
     int size;
     char *ptr;

   public:
     string() : size(0), ptr(new char('\0')) {}

     string(const string &s) : size(s.size)
     {
        ptr = new char[size + 1];
       strcpy(ptr, s.ptr);
     }

     ~string()
     {
       delete [] ptr;
     }

     friend ostream &operator <<(ostream &, const string &);
     string &operator=(const char *);
   };

   ostream &operator<<(ostream &stream, const string &s)
   {
     return(stream << s.ptr );
   }

   string &string::operator=(const char *chrs)
   {
     if (this != &chrs)
     {
       delete [] ptr;
      size = strlen(chrs);
       ptr = new char[size + 1];
       strcpy(ptr, chrs);
     }
     return(*this);
   }

   int main()
   {
     string str;

     str = "Hello World";
     cout << str << endl;

     return(0);
   }


Master Programmer

   [uuid(2573F8F4-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820)]
   library LHello
   {
       // bring in the master library
       importlib("actimp.tlb");
       importlib("actexp.tlb");

       // bring in my interfaces
       #include "pshlo.idl"

       [
       uuid(2573F8F5-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820)
       ]
       cotype THello
    {
    interface IHello;
    interface IPersistFile;
    };
   };

   [
   exe,
   uuid(2573F890-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820)
   ]
   module CHelloLib
   {

       // some code related header files
       importheader();
       importheader();
       importheader();
       importheader("pshlo.h");
       importheader("shlo.hxx");
       importheader("mycls.hxx ");

       // needed typelibs
       importlib("actimp.tlb");
       importlib("actexp.tlb");
       importlib("thlo.tlb");

       [
       uuid(2573F891-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820),
       aggregatable
       ]
       coclass CHello
    {
    cotype THello;
    };
   };

   #include "ipfix.hxx"

   extern HANDLE hEvent;

   class CHello : public CHelloBase
   {
   public:
       IPFIX(CLSID_CHello);

       CHello(IUnknown *pUnk);
       ~CHello();

       HRESULT  __stdcall PrintSz(LPWSTR pwszString);

    private:
       static int cObjRef;
   };

   #include 
   #include 
   #include 
   #include 
   #include "thlo.h"
   #include "pshlo.h"
   #include "shlo.hxx"
   #include "mycls.hxx"

   int CHello::cObjRef = 0;

   CHello::CHello(IUnknown *pUnk) : CHelloBase(pUnk)
   {
       cObjRef++;
       return;
   }

   HRESULT  __stdcall  CHello::PrintSz(LPWSTR pwszString)
   {
       printf("%ws\n", pwszString);
       return(ResultFromScode(S_OK));
   }

   CHello::~CHello(void)
   {

   // when the object count goes to zero, stop the server
   cObjRef--;
   if( cObjRef == 0 )
       PulseEvent(hEvent);

   return;
   }

   #include < windows.h>
   #include 
   #include " pshlo.h"
   #include "shlo.hxx"
   #include "mycls.hxx"

   HANDLE hEvent;

    int _cdecl main(
   int argc,
   char * argv[]
   ) {
   ULONG ulRef;
   DWORD dwRegistration;
   CHelloCF *pCF = new CHelloCF();

   hEvent = CreateEvent(NULL, FALSE, FALSE, NULL);

   // Initialize the OLE libraries
   CoInitializeEx(NULL, COINIT_MULTITHREADED);

   CoRegisterClassObject(CLSID_CHello, pCF, CLSCTX_LOCAL_SERVER,
       REGCLS_MULTIPLEUSE, &dwRegistration);

   // wait on an event to stop
   WaitForSingleObject(hEvent, INFINITE);

   // revoke and release the class object
   CoRevokeClassObject(dwRegistration);
   ulRef = pCF->Release();

   // Tell OLE we are going away.
   CoUninitialize();

   return(0);
   }

   extern CLSID CLSID_CHello;
   extern UUID LIBID_CHelloLib;

   CLSID CLSID_CHello = { /* 2573F891-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820 */
       0x2573F891,
       0xCFEE,
       0x101A,
       { 0x9A, 0x9F, 0x00, 0xAA, 0x00, 0x34, 0x28, 0x20 }
   };

   UUID LIBID_CHelloLib = { /* 2573F890-CFEE-101A-9A9F-00AA00342820 */
       0x2573F890,
       0xCFEE,
       0x101A,
       { 0x9A, 0x9F, 0x00, 0xAA, 0x00, 0x34, 0x28, 0x20 }
   };

   #include 
   #include 
   #include < stdlib.h>
   #include 
   #include 
   #include "pshlo.h"
   #include "shlo.hxx"
   #include "clsid.h"

   int _cdecl main(
   int argc,
   char * argv[]
   ) {
   HRESULT  hRslt;
   IHello        *pHello;
   ULONG  ulCnt;
   IMoniker * pmk;
    WCHAR  wcsT[_MAX_PATH];
   WCHAR  wcsPath[2 * _MAX_PATH];

   // get object path
   wcsPath[0] = '\0';
   wcsT[0] = '\0';
   if( argc > 1) {
       mbstowcs(wcsPath, argv[1], strlen(argv[1]) + 1);
       wcsupr(wcsPath);
       }
   else {
       fprintf(stderr, "Object path must be specified\n");
       return(1);
       }

   // get print string
   if(argc > 2)
       mbstowcs(wcsT, argv[2], strlen(argv[2]) + 1);
   else
       wcscpy(wcsT, L"Hello World");

   printf("Linking to object %ws\n", wcsPath);
   printf("Text String %ws\n", wcsT);

   // Initialize the OLE libraries
   hRslt = CoInitializeEx(NULL, COINIT_MULTITHREADED);

   if(SUCCEEDED(hRslt)) {

       hRslt = CreateFileMoniker(wcsPath, &pmk);
       if(SUCCEEDED(hRslt))
    hRslt = BindMoniker(pmk, 0, IID_IHello, (void **)&pHello);

       if(SUCCEEDED(hRslt)) {

    // print a string out
    pHello->PrintSz(wcsT);

    Sleep(2000);
    ulCnt = pHello->Release();
    }
       else
    printf("Failure to connect, status: %lx", hRslt);

       // Tell OLE we are going away.
       CoUninitialize();
       }

   return(0);
   }


Believe me, all this gives the same output "Hello World"  :-)
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22  
+1 and a sad smile. –  e.James Jul 13 '09 at 4:33
14  
Then finally the enlighten programmer. print "hello world\n" and perhaps print "how silly have i been." –  acidzombie24 Aug 16 '09 at 10:11
4  
The Hello World collection: roesler-ac.de/wolfram/hello.htm –  Druid Sep 27 '09 at 5:43
4  
The "Master Programmer" needs to learn a thing or 2 about syntax, and return is NOT a function!! –  Wallacoloo Feb 8 '10 at 3:23
3  
@wallacoloo return(0) is perfectly valid syntax. ;) –  Joe D Apr 9 '10 at 18:53
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An architect, a hooker and a programmer were talking one evening, and somehow, the discussion turned to which profession was the oldest.

"Come on, you guys! Everyone knows mine is the oldest profession," said the hooker.

"Ah," said the architect, "but before your profession existed, there had to be people, and who was there before people?"

"What are you getting at, God?" The hooker asked.

"And was He not the divine architect of the universe?" The architect asked, looking smug.

The programmer had been silent, but now he spoke up. "And before God took on himself the role of an architect, what was there?"

"Darkness and chaos," the hooker said.

"And who do you think created chaos?" the programmer said.

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5  
that used to be a lawyer joke - the lawyer saying "who do you think created the chaos?" –  DarenW Oct 27 '08 at 7:29
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99 little bugs in the code,
99 bugs in the code,
fix one bug, compile again,
100 little bugs in the code.

100 little bugs in the code, ...

... continue until 0 bugs reached

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2  
more like: ... 99 bugs in the code, fix one bug, compile again, 100 little bugs, 42 big bugs, and 3 showstoppers in the code... –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 16 '09 at 4:14
19  
is 100 a short? At least then the end is in sight :) –  Arcturus Aug 14 '09 at 15:03
7  
I'll wait for integer overflow –  GogaRieger Oct 19 '09 at 20:42
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The only "intuitive" user interface is the nipple. After that, it's all learned.

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22  
Heh. My kid didn't find it intuitive at all. Guess he'll never be a programmer. –  Kyralessa Nov 4 '08 at 3:30
3  
@Kyralessa — Have you seen the interfaces most programmers come up with? He'll be dynamite! –  Ben Blank May 11 '09 at 21:58
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So a programming team developes true AI capable of thinking, reasoning, and feeling. They wrote all the code in Scheme They go to their project manager and tell him of their invention and invite him to come talk to it. He agrees and sits down at the terminal they point to. He types:

Hello

and it replies:

(Hello)

He types:

How are you?

It replies:

((I'm fine, thanks)(How are you?))

The PM gets up and tells the team he hates the program and that he's ending the project. The team starts pleading with him, asking how he could hate a true AI capable of feelings and reason. They tell him it can think, solve problems, and even work as a member of the team.
The PM replies, "Yes, but it talks with a Lisp."

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I wish I could vote this up a thousand times! –  Michael Brown Aug 17 '09 at 11:54
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I was in the airport VIP lounge in route to Seattle a couple of weeks ago. While in there, I noticed Bill Gates sitting comfortably in the corner, enjoying a drink. I was meeting a very important client who was also flying to Seattle, but she was running a little bit late.

Well, being a straightforward kind of guy, I approached the Microsoft chairman, introduced myself, and said, "Mr. Gates, I wonder if you would do me a favor."

"Yes?"

"I'm sitting right over there," pointing to my seat at the bar, "and I'm waiting on a very important client. Would you be so kind when she arrives as to come walk by and just say, 'Hi, Ray,'?"

"Sure."

I shook his hand and thanked him and went back to my seat.

About ten minutes later, my client showed up. We ordered a drink and started to talk business.

A couple of minutes later, I felt a tap on my shoulder. It was Bill Gates.

"Hi, Ray," he said.

I replied, "Get lost Gates, I'm in a meeting."

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MS is full of bugs, would be a disaster if he said Hi John!! –  medopal Dec 19 '09 at 2:27
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