Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using NUnit to write unit tests for a libary a colleague of mine has written. His library contains a lot of Debug.Asserts which triggers on invalid input. When I'm writing the unit tests and give invalid input to his library, his Debug.Assert throws up a message box complaining about the bad input.

I feel that it's a good thing that his library throws up an assert on invalid input, but at the same time I want the unit tests to cover bad input. But when I do this, the message box shows up and I have to manually click OK to continue with the remaining unit tests.

In case it isn't clear, my problem is that the unit test process stops on the Debug.Assert. People are supposed to run their unit tests prior to any checkin and it's supposed to be automatic and should not throw up messages unless a test has failed..

What's the "best" approach in this case?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Take a look at the MSDN documentation for the Debug.Assert method. Specifically under "Remarks", it explains how you can disable the UI:

<configuration>
  <system.diagnostics>
    <assert assertuienabled="false" logfilename="c:\\myFile.log" />
  </system.diagnostics>
</configuration>

Therefore I'd suggest that the application config file has this by default and your colleague switches on Assert to UI whenever he feels it useful to do so.

share|improve this answer

As Henk already noted, suppressing the UI is useless, because you want your that code to fail. When you don't want to change your code, you can write a custom trace listener that throws an exception, as follows:

public class ProductionTraceListener : DefaultTraceListener
{
    public override void Fail(string message, string detailMessage)
    {
        string failMessage = message;

        if (detailMessage != null)
        {
            failMessage += " " + detailMessage;
        }

        throw new AssertionFailedException(failMessage);
    }
}

[Serializable]
public class AssertionFailedException : Exception
{
    public AssertionFailedException() { }
    public AssertionFailedException(string message) : base(message) { }
    public AssertionFailedException(string message, Exception inner) 
        : base(message, inner) { }
    protected AssertionFailedException(SerializationInfo info,
        StreamingContext context) : base(info, context) { }
}

And you can register it as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <system.diagnostics>
    <trace>
      <listeners>
        <clear />
        <add name="Default"
          type="[Namespace].ProductionTraceListener, [Assembly]" />
      </listeners>
    </trace>
  </system.diagnostics>
</configuration>

As you already might expect from the trace listener's name ProductionTraceListener, I use that thing in my production environment (web applications), and not in my unit tests. While you can use this trick in your unit tests, I advice you to change your code. IMO you should only use asserts for code paths that should never run, and if they do, the test should fail. In your situation you want to have a succeeding test when a assert fails, which is counterintuitive.

My advice is to change the code and use normal if (x) throw ArgumentException() checks for preconditions (or use CuttingEdge.Conditions) and use those asserts only for code paths that should never run. Also try using Trace.Assert instead of Debug.Assert, because you also want those asserts to be checked in your production environment. When you've done that you can use the ProductionTraceListener in your production environment, and this UnitTestTraceListener in your unit tests.

public class UnitTestTraceListener : DefaultTraceListener
{
    public override void Fail(string message, string detailMessage)
    {
        string failMessage = message;

        if (detailMessage != null)
        {
            failMessage += " " + detailMessage;
        }

        // Call to Assert method of used unit testing framework.
        Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.Assert.Fail(
            failMessage);
    }
}

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
This would look good for Trace.Assert(), but the OP mentions Debug.Assert(). –  Henk Holterman Feb 26 '10 at 13:34
    
Plus, you want the code to fail in the unit tests when running them as part of an automated build proess. The Asserts are for the developers benefit whilst running the code. –  Rob Feb 26 '10 at 14:55
    
@Henk && @Rob: I'm not sure I follow you. Configuring the ProductionTraceListener in the unit test environment would allow the unit tests to fail when the methods didn't throw the expected AssertionFailedException. When unit tests are ran in debug mode this will do exactly as he whishes, won't it? Please enlighten me. –  Steven Feb 26 '10 at 15:30
    
Steven, Debug.Assert() is bad because it makes the Debug build behave different from the Release build. Which behavior do you want to test? –  Henk Holterman Feb 26 '10 at 20:00
    
Henk, that's exactly why I advice to use Trace.Assert. Having a debug build behave differently is a bad thing. I think we think the same about this. –  Steven Feb 27 '10 at 23:25

A simple option that I find effective is to use the standard ConsoleTraceListener, which will allow the Debug.Assert checks to fire but will direct their output to the NUnit Text Output tab without otherwise influencing the unit test.

You can add this to your test setup ...

[SetUp]
public void SetUp()
{
    // Replace pop-up assert trace listener with one that simply logs a message.
    Debug.Listeners.Clear();
    Debug.Listeners.Add(new ConsoleTraceListener());
}

Just don't forget to check the text output when a test fails!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.