Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
struct Foo {
    char * DataPtr;
}; 

class ISomeInterface {
public:
    Foo GetFoo( ) const;
    Foo GetFoo( );
};

The Foo::DataPtr is a pointer to an internal buffer of the object behing ISomeInterface. Is there a way to make sure that the Foo::DataPtr returned by the const version of ISomeInterface::GetFoo is a const char * ?

share|improve this question
    
Foo::DataPtr is a type so is char const* - what do you mean - if you want toi return char const* then just declare as char const* GetFoo() cons; –  Mark Feb 26 '10 at 10:51
    
Foo::DataPtr is not a type but a member of the struct Foo with the type char * (or const char *). In the real world, Foo is more complex, so returning a char * (or const char *) is not an option. –  Björn Pollex Feb 26 '10 at 12:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need a

struct ConstFoo {
   const char* DataPtr;
};

for this. The const in C++ is not transitive. (this is also why you have iterator and const_iterator.)

share|improve this answer
    
So, no simple solution then. Thanks. –  Björn Pollex Feb 26 '10 at 15:21

A struct

struct Foo {  
    char * DataPtr;  
}

is not the same as

struct Foo {  
    const char * DataPtr;
}

so you cannot differentiate how you would like.

You could make the const GetFoo() return a const Foo object (which I suspect is not what you want, as it will make all the member variables const), or make another struct with a const char * DataPtr (say FooConst) which is returned on the const call.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I could use a const object, since it is just a data object that is supposed to be read-only. I was just not sure if I can use const on an object, or just on references and pointers. –  Björn Pollex Feb 26 '10 at 12:22

You could try to change the design of your Foo and 'hide' the acess to DataPtr behind functions. For instance:

class Foo {
    char * DataPtr;
public:
    //just some examples
    void doThis() const {}
    void doThat() {}
}; 

class ISomeInterface {
public:
    const Foo GetFoo( ) const { return Foo(); }
    Foo GetFoo( ) { return Foo(); }
}; 

...

const Foo foo1 = ISomeInterface().GetFoo();
foo1.doThis();
foo1.doThat(); //error
Foo foo2 = ISomeInterface().GetFoo();
foo2.doThis();
foo2.doThat();

Providing functions that define which operations are const and those that are not you can avoid duplicating your Foo and obtain the const-correctness restrictions you seem to be aiming for.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I was hoping to get it working without that, to avoid unecessary code clutter. –  Björn Pollex Feb 26 '10 at 15:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.