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I want to append this to my DOM for every 'answer_' in my DB.

.append('<span>')
.text(format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate))

But .LastModifiedDate won't always exist. Can I check for .LastModifiedDate in the text field? Maybe like this?

.append('<span>')
.text((answer_.LastModifiedDate) ? format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate) : '')

Which doesn't work...

EDIT

I was stupidly checking for answer_.LastModifiedDate, instead of just answer. So the following line works. Thanks for all the responses!

.append('<span>')
.text((answer_) ? format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate) : '')
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closed as off-topic by Andrew Barber May 30 at 18:38

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1  
Have you tried that? How "doesn't" it work? What errors do you see in your console? Also, what's answer_? –  Rocket Hazmat May 1 at 14:32
    
I suppose if answer_ is ever null or undefined, that would cause you some trouble. Can you get results with .text(answer_ != null && answer_.LastModifiedDate != null ? format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate) : '')? –  Cory May 1 at 14:43

3 Answers 3

Of course that works. Ternary operators work anywhere you could normally place a variable. They evaluate to a value, just as if you used a string literal.

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Aaaaanywhere? var five ? 5 : 7; Well, they work anywhere an expression is allowed. I'm just being picky. –  Cory May 1 at 14:34
    
@Cory That's what I get for not qualifying my statement. –  FreeAsInBeer May 1 at 14:35
    
If I want to be extremely picky, five in my example is a variable, and the ternary operator is not allowed, so my cruel, cruel example still holds up. Clearly I am a bad person. –  Cory May 1 at 14:36
    
Actually, in your example, five is a pointer to a variable. –  FreeAsInBeer May 1 at 14:37
    
I guess we should always aim for precision. So, five is a variable name, except that the code has invalid syntax, so there are no variables, only parser errors. –  Cory May 1 at 14:40

As @FreeAsInBeer pointed out, ternary works everywhere.
The only problem with your code is that you can't just use a (maybe) non-existant value as a boolean to check whether it is defined or not; How would you check if a variable holding "false" exists? Instead you need to check the variables type:

.text(typeof answer_.LastModifiedDate !== 'undefined' ? format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate) : '')
share|improve this answer
    
Properties of objects can always be read. As long as answer_ is not null or undefined, the . operator in the Daft's code should evaluate without exception. –  Cory May 1 at 14:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was stupidly checking for answer_.LastModifiedDate, instead of just answer. So the following line works. Thanks for all the responses!

.append('<span>')
.text((answer_) ? format_date(answer_.LastModifiedDate) : '')
share|improve this answer

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