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Update

As @ikegami suggested, I reported this as a bug.

Bug #121783 for perl5: Windows: UTF-8 encoded output in cmd.exe with code page 65001 causes unexpected output

Consider the following C and Perl programs which both output a the UTF-8 encoding of the string "αβγ" on standard output:

C version:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    /* UTF-8 encoded alpha, beta, gamma */
    char x[] = { 0xce, 0xb1, 0xce, 0xb2, 0xce, 0xb3, 0x00 };
    puts(x);
    return 0;
}
Output:
C:\…> chcp 65001
Active code page: 65001

C:\…> cttt.exe
αβγ

Perl version:

C:\…>  perl -e "print qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3\n}"
αβγ
�

From what I can tell, the last octet, 0xb3 is being output again, on another line, which is being translated to U+FFFD.

Note that redirecting output eliminates this effect.

I can also verify that it is the last octet being repeated:

C:\…>  perl -e "print qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3xyz\n}"
αβγxyz
z

On the other hand, syswrite avoids this problem.

C:\…>  perl -e "syswrite STDOUT, qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3xyz\n}"
αβγxyz

I have observed this in cmd.exe windows on Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit and Windows Vista Home 32-bit using both self-built perl 5.18.2 and ActiveState's 5.16.3.

I do not see the problem in Cygwin, Linux, or Mac OS X environments. Also, Cygwin's perl 5.14.4 produces correct output in cmd.exe.

Also, when the code page is set to 437, the output from both the C and the Perl versions is identical:

C:\…> chcp 437
Active code page: 437

C:\…> cttt.exe
╬▒╬▓╬│

C:\…>  perl -e "print qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3\n}"
╬▒╬▓╬│

What is causing the last octet to be output twice when printing from perl program in cmd.exe when the code page is set to 65001?

PS: I have some more information and screenshots on my blog. For this question, I have tried to distill everything to the simplest possible cases.

PPS: Leaving out the \n results in something even more interesting:

C:\…> perl -e "print qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3xyz}"
αβγxyzxyz
C:\…> perl -e "print qq{\xce\xb1\xce\xb2\xce\xb3}"
αβγ�γ�
share|improve this question
    
My guess: a bug somewhere in the windows shell. –  Filipe Gonçalves May 1 at 20:41
2  
@FilipeGonçalves Given that both the C version and syswrite work as expected, I suspect it is an interaction between Perl's :crlf IO layer and code page 65001. But, I do not know exactly where to look. Pointers welcome. –  Sinan Ünür May 1 at 20:52
    
Submit a bug report using perlbug –  ikegami May 1 at 21:08
    
What happens if you leave out the \n ? –  Harry Johnston May 1 at 22:28
    
Does stdout, in text mode on windows, translate the '\n\ into "\r\n"? Have no idea how that would explain this, but another thought. –  chux May 1 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following program produces the correct output:

use utf8;
use strict;
use warnings;
use warnings qw(FATAL utf8);

binmode(STDOUT, ":unix:encoding(utf8):crlf");

print 'αβγxyz', "\n";

Output:

C:\…> chcp 65001
Active code page: 65001
C:\…> perl pttt.pl
αβγxyz

which seems to indicate to me there is some funkiness with the :crlf layer. I do not understand the internals enough to comment intelligently about this at this point.

After many experiments, I have come to the conclusion that, if the console is already set to 65001 code page, binmode(STDOUT, ":unix:encoding(utf8):crlf"); will "work". However, note the following:

binmode(STDOUT, ":unix:encoding(utf8):crlf");
print Dump [
    map {
        my $x = defined($_) ? $_ : '';
        $x =~ s/\A([0-9]+)\z/sprintf '0x%08x', $1/eg;
        $x;
    } PerlIO::get_layers(STDOUT, details => 1)
];
print "αβγxyz\n";

gives me:

---
- unix
- ''
- 0x01205200
- crlf
- ''
- 0x00c85200
- unix
- ''
- 0x01201200
- encoding
- utf8
- 0x00c89200
- crlf
- ''
- 0x00c8d200
αβγxyz

As before, I do not know enough to know the full consequences of this. I do intend to build a debug perl at some point to further diagnose this.

I examined this a little further. Here are some observations from that post:

The flags for the first unix layer are 0x01205200 = CANWRITE | TRUNCATE | CRLF | OPEN | NOTREG. Why is CRLF set for the unix layer on Windows? I do not know about the internals enough to understand this.

However, the flags for the second unix layer, the one pushed by my explicit binmode, are 0x01201200 = 0x01205200 & ~CRLF. This is what would have made sense to me to begin with.

The flags for the first crlf layer are 0x00c85200 = CANWRITE | TRUNCATE | CRLF | LINEBUF | FASTGETS | TTY. The flags for the second layer, which I push after the :encoding(utf8) layer are 0x00c8d200 = 0x00c85200 | UTF8.

Now, if I open a file using open my $fh, '>:encoding(utf8)', 'ttt', and dump the same information, I get:

---
- unix
- ''
- 0x00201200
- crlf
- ''
- 0x00405200
- encoding
- utf8
- 0x00409200

As expected, the unix layer does not set the CRLF flag.

share|improve this answer
    
You may want to try my PerlIO::Layers instead of using PerlIO::get_layers, it gives much more friendly output. –  Leon Timmermans May 8 at 14:46
    
A bug in the :crlf layer? surely you jest. /s –  Ether May 8 at 20:23
    
@Ether It looks to me like a bug in the unix layer on Windows when output is to cmd.exe. But, I can't figure out why PERLIO_F_CRLF is getting set on the bottom-most unix layer. –  Sinan Ünür May 8 at 23:20

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