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I often need to stack 2d numpy arrays (tiff images). For that, I first append them in a list and use np.dstack. This seems to be the fastest way to get 3D array stacking images. But, is there a faster/memory-efficient way?

from time import time
import numpy as np

# Create 100 images of the same dimention 256x512 (8-bit). 
# In reality, each image comes from a different file
img = np.random.randint(0,255,(256, 512, 100))

t0 = time()
temp = []
for n in range(100):
    temp.append(img[:,:,n])
stacked = np.dstack(temp)
#stacked = np.array(temp)  # much slower 3.5 s for 100

print time()-t0  # 0.58 s for 100 frames
print stacked.shape

# dstack in each loop is slower
t0 = time()
temp = img[:,:,0]
for n in range(1, 100):
    temp = np.dstack((temp, img[:,:,n]))
print time()-t0  # 3.13 s for 100 frames
print temp.shape

# counter-intuitive but preallocation is slightly slower
stacked = np.empty((256, 512, 100))
t0 = time()
for n in range(100):
    stacked[:,:,n] = img[:,:,n]
print time()-t0  # 0.651 s for 100 frames
print stacked.shape

# (Edit) As in the accepted answer, re-arranging axis to mainly use 
# the first axis to access data improved the speed significantly.
img = np.random.randint(0,255,(100, 256, 512))

stacked = np.empty((100, 256, 512))
t0 = time()
for n in range(100):
    stacked[n,:,:] = img[n,:,:]
print time()-t0  # 0.08 s for 100 frames
print stacked.shape
share|improve this question
    
You can avoid calling dstack by guaranteeing that all arrays in temp if this condition is met you can simply call stacked = np.concatenate(temp,axis=2) which may save a small amount of time in python overhead. If you show more code there may be a better way to do it, but as shown the top code is just about optimal. –  Ophion May 1 '14 at 21:57
    
Arrays in temp are all 2D and I want to concatenate to get a 3D array. So, np.concatenate(temp, axis=2) will produce an error: axis 2 out of bounds [0, 2). np.concatenate(temp, axis=1) will create a 2D array (256x51200). –  otterb May 1 '14 at 22:03
    
I missed a critical part of my comment, it should have read "...all arrays in temp are 3D if this condition is met..". It should be noted that this saving is trivial except for very large temp sizes, likely on the order of ~2us per array. –  Ophion May 1 '14 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After some joint effort with otterb, we concluded that preallocating of the array is the way to go. Apparently the performance killing bottleneck was the array layout with the image number (n) being the fastest changing index. If we make n the first index of the array (which will default to the "C" ordering: first index changest slowest, last index changes fastest) we get the best performance:

from time import time
import numpy as np

# Create 100 images of the same dimention 256x512 (8-bit). 
# In reality, each image comes from a different file
img = np.random.randint(0,255,(100, 256, 512))

# counter-intuitive but preallocation is slightly slower
stacked = np.empty((100, 256, 512))
t0 = time()
for n in range(100):
    stacked[n] = img[n]
print time()-t0  
print stacked.shape
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I also thought that preallocation should be the fastest but somehow it was slightly slower. I updated my question to include preallocation. Any idea why? –  otterb May 3 '14 at 14:41
    
Hi, that's very interesting indeed, I would have bet that it is faster. Say could you try if it makes a difference when you put the time index as the first one (the idea being that the chunks you write can be accessed more easily). A guess why it might be slower is the indexing of arrays has some overhead that allows for example negative numbers. With cython you could get rid of those... –  Magellan88 May 3 '14 at 20:21
    
You mean stacked[n,:,:] instead of stacked[:,:,n]? Good idea. I will try when I have access to the same PC I used for profiling. –  otterb May 4 '14 at 15:25
1  
Yes! I re-arranged the axes as you suggested. Now it's significantly faster. I already accepted your answer but, can you maybe modify your answer to clarify about the first axis?? –  otterb May 5 '14 at 8:08
    
Hi otterb, thanks for the effort. really glad that it works. I must say I also learned something from this. I put the answer in a form that should be useful for others as well as reflects your contribution. Would you care to supply the performance you got so we can put it in there as well? –  Magellan88 May 5 '14 at 11:00

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