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I want to check if my string has two consecutive spaces in it. What's the easiest way to find out?

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s.find(" ") perhaps? –  falstro Feb 26 '10 at 13:11
1  
I agree with @Jon Winstanley... by space do you mean ASCII character 32 (0x20), or do you mean white-space in general? –  Bill Feb 26 '10 at 13:31
    
I think just it's just whitespace. Strings don't see whitespace and spaces as the same thing? –  neuromancer Feb 27 '10 at 7:54

6 Answers 6

Use the find() method of std::string. It returns the special constant std::string::npos if the value was not found, so this is easy to check for:

if (myString.find("  ") != std::string::npos)
{
  cerr << "double spaces found!";
}
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#include <string>

bool are_there_two_spaces(const std::string& s) {
    if (s.find("  ") != std::string::npos) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
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2  
Why explicit returns of boolean values? If you want to have a function, consider just returning the result of the comparison directly. It's boolean by definition. –  unwind Feb 26 '10 at 13:25
    
return (s.find(" ") != std::string::npos); should do. However, this'll be optimized out I guess. –  legends2k Feb 26 '10 at 13:33
    
@unwind: I know that, but since the asker didn't know about this function, I tried to write the example as clearly as possible. –  Javier Badia Feb 26 '10 at 14:40

This one of Jon Skeet's fave topics: see this presentation

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Make search for "  " in the string.
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2  
Sorry, but what? –  moatPylon Feb 26 '10 at 13:13
2  
Oh, you aren't familiar with English++? –  user123456 Feb 26 '10 at 14:28

Using C:

#include <cstring>
...
addr = strstr (str, "  ");
...
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2  
If you're going to use strstr, you should use str.c_str(), because it takes a char *. –  Javier Badia Feb 26 '10 at 13:14
string s = "foo  bar";
int i = s.find("  ");
if(i != string::npos)
   cout << "Found at: " << i << endl;
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