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I wrote a python class, named DataExportToJson, which is used to read a file and export them into JSON formate. Then I embedded this class in another class, called ProcessFromData, like the following way:

import DataExportToJson  **#Example(1)**
class ProcessFromData´╝Ü
    def processing(self, fileName):
        (doing something...)
        DataExportToJson.export_json(fileName)
    return True

The above code runs well if its directly called from my console. Then this ProcessFromData class is embedded inside a view file in Django server. (I am using django 1.5.5 and nginx 1.1.19) That is, in a views.py I wrote this:

from thirdparty.ProcessFromData import ProcessFromData
def BookApp(request):
    if request.method == 'GET':
        inStance = ProcessFromData()
        inStance.processing(fileName)

By using the above code, I got a "502 Bad Gateway " error. In the log, I saw:

[error] 21443#0: *4 upstream prematurely closed connection while reading response header from upstream, client: 192.168.157.1, server: BookAppcollect, upstream: "uwsgi://unix:///tmp/uwsgi.sock:", 

After several trials, I mistakenly change ProcessFromData class by re-importing the DataExportToJson class:

class ProcessFromData´╝Ü   **#Example(2)**
    def processing(self, fileName):
        (doing something...)
        import DataExportToJson           **#difference here**
        DataExportToJson.export_json(fileName)
    return True

Then everything goes fine. Now I am confused. My questions are:

  1. what is the difference between #Example(1) and #Example(2)
  2. is the problem coming from the memory limit? how does the "502 Bad Gateway " error happen?
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried running this code on the built in development server? Import #1 is failing perhaps due to name conflict or circular dependency and when imported within the function (#2) it succeeds. Importing within the function is only deferring the loading in this instance which appears to resolve the issue. It's still imported only once though. –  AndrewS May 2 '14 at 5:28
    
@AndrewS There is not a name conflict or dependency issue. What I did was to use example1 while importing another file with small amount of data. That works:(... So there should not be anything wrong with the code grammar. I guess something wrong with the memory or processing time limit? –  Student Jack May 5 '14 at 1:52

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