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I have the following typedef's in my code:

typedef unsigned long int ulint;
typedef std::map<ulint, particle> mapType;
typedef std::vector< std::vector<mapType> > mapGridType;

particle is a custom class with no default constructor.

VS2008 gives me an error in this code:

std::set<ulint> gridOM::ids(int filter)
{
    std::set<ulint> result;
    ulint curId;
    for ( int i = 0; i < _dimx; ++i ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j < _dimy; ++j ) {
            // next line is reported to be erroneous
            for ( mapType::iterator cur = objectMap[i][j].begin(); cur != objectMap[i][j].end(); ++cur )
            {
                curId = (*cur).first;
                if ( (isStatic(curId) && filter != 2) || (!isStatic(curId) && filter != 1) )
                {
                    result.insert(curId);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

objectMap is an object of mapGridType. The error reads:

error C2512: 'gridOM::particle::particle' : no appropriate default constructor available
while compiling class template member function 'gridOM::particle &std::map<_Kty,_Ty>::operator [](const unsigned long &)'  
        with  
        [  
            _Kty=ulint,  
            _Ty=gridOM::particle  
        ]  
        .\gridOM.cpp(114) : see reference to class template   instantiation 'std::map<_Kty,_Ty>'   being compiled  
        with  
        [  
            _Kty=ulint,  
            _Ty=gridOM::particle  
        ]  

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the above code should not be making calls to map::operator[] at all. The first operator[] call is made to vector< vector<mapType> > and returns a vector<mapType>, the second is made to vector<mapType> and returns a mapType aka a map<ulint, particle>, and I only call begin() and end on that map. So why do I get an error trying to compile the operator[] for map?

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2  
Could you provide definition for objectMap? –  Paul Feb 26 '10 at 13:45
1  
You don't think perhaps the map's iterators use operator[] internally when dereferenced? –  KitsuneYMG Feb 26 '10 at 13:51
    
objectMap is of type mapGridType (edited the question) –  suszterpatt Feb 26 '10 at 14:11
    
The code you have posted compiles for me on VS2008 SP1. Are you sure the error is on the line with the for? Because even when I tried to use operator [] of the map and therefore generate the error, I only got error in map itself, no mention of my source or line number there. I recommend commenting out parts of your program until you find exactly where's your problem –  sbk Feb 26 '10 at 14:33
    
@kts: btw, it makes no sense for an iterator to be using operator[] for map. First, operator[] performs a map-search with O(NlogN) complexity which would be insanely slow for a dereference operation. Second, iterators can, should and actually do access the internal map tree structure - they just don't need operator[]. Third, as mentioned, operator[] requires default-constructable value types while map in general doesn't. –  sbk Feb 26 '10 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

I'm not sure of my answer. But when you instanciate a template, the compiler implements all the functions defined in the template (even if they aren't used). So you get the error, even if there is no use of the function.

Could you give the complete error message?

EDIT With the full error message, you get the problem! As you told, your object has no default constructor. However, in order to use a map, you need the default constructor (as it is required by the function operator[] in order to build an instance when using a new key), even if you don't use the function, it will be implemented by the compiler.

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Sorry, accidentally left off the first line of the error. Edited. –  suszterpatt Feb 26 '10 at 14:10
5  
Not true. Each class template definition in reality defines a template for the class type itself and declares a bunch of independent templates for its member functions. (Yes, each member function is an independent template). When you instantiate class template, member functions don't get immediately instantiated, until you actually call them or force their instantiation in some other way. So, until you actually call std::map<>::operator[] it must not get instantiated, even if you already instantiated std::map<> itself. –  AndreyT Feb 26 '10 at 14:29
1  
Regarding your edit. I'm actually editing code that was working before. The typedef's were the same, and the code compiled and ran even with no default constructor for particle. I'm fairly sure that templates get instantiated on a per-method basis rather than per-class: that is, the compiler wouldn't try to instantiate map::operator[] unless I made a call to it. –  suszterpatt Feb 26 '10 at 14:31
1  
They're usually instantiated per-method, but you could cause all method to be instantiated using the statement template std::map<ulint, particle>; –  Joe Gauterin Feb 26 '10 at 15:42

The code you posted is perfectly fine and compiles without any errors at the for line in GCC and Comeau (Onlie) compilers. Right now I have no way to try it in VS2008 specifically, unfortunately.

If the error is indeed triggered by the for line, I'd suspect a problem in the compiler. There's a chance that the implementation of std::map<>::begin() or std::map<>::end() somehow depends on std::map<>::operator[]() in VS2008, but that would be rather strange.

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I can compile that code on VS2008 without errors –  J. Calleja Feb 26 '10 at 14:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Case closed. It turns out that I did in fact make the coding mistake of writing a call to operator[], but it was hundreds of lines further down in the source file from where the error was reported. Apparently VS just pointed me to the first usage of a variable of mapType instead of the actual point where it tried to instantiate the method.

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