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I have a .R file that was already written to just go through a CSV file and plot the data. I tried to add some lines to grab and output the top 5 rows based on Frequency, but am getting odd results

Here's the code:

    require (stringr)

    generate_names <-function ( gender, name) {

      genderfn<-paste(gender,"_names.csv",sep="",collapse=NULL)
      fn <- paste("../datasets/Ontario_names/", genderfn,sep="",collapse = NULL)

      A <- read.csv(fn, skip=1, header=TRUE)
      print(dim(A))
      # Recode the Frequency measurement to be certain it is an integer
      A$Frequency <- as.integer(A$Frequency)

      #pdf(paste(name, ".pdf",sep="", collapse =NULL))

      #generate a logical vector of matching names
      g <- stringr::str_trim(A$Name)==toupper(name)

      #use the logical vector to create a smaller data frame
      name.df <- A[g,]

      #my little addition
      ordered <- name.df[order(A$Frequency, decreasing = F),]
      top5 <- head( ordered, 50)
      print(top5)


      #plot the distribution of name registrations over years
      plot(name.df$Year,name.df$Frequency,
           type="p",
           main=paste(toupper(name)," in Ontario"), 
           xlab="Birth Year", ylab = "Number",
           xlim=c(min(name.df$Year),max(name.df$Year)),
           ylim=c(0,max(name.df$Frequency)) )
      #grid()
      #dev.off()
    }

    # Replace the gender and names and try some different names
    generate_names("male","grant")
    generate_names("female","mary")

The output is kind of odd. These are snippets of the 2 functions:

    > generate_names("male","grant")
    [1] 66351     3
          Year  Name Frequency
    26720 1917 GRANT        25
    26729 1926 GRANT        36
    26733 1930 GRANT        36
    26734 1931 GRANT        33
    26735 1932 GRANT        36
    26737 1934 GRANT        47
    26738 1935 GRANT        45
    26740 1937 GRANT        43
    26741 1938 GRANT        46
    26743 1940 GRANT        51
    26744 1941 GRANT        67
    26765 1962 GRANT       157
    26771 1968 GRANT       132
    26774 1971 GRANT        93
    26776 1973 GRANT        89
    26783 1980 GRANT        69
    NA      NA  <NA>        NA
    NA.1    NA  <NA>        NA
    NA.2    NA  <NA>        NA
    NA.3    NA  <NA>        NA

    > generate_names("female","mary")
    [1] 83035     3
          Year Name Frequency
    57032 1955 MARY       572
    57060 1983 MARY       579
    57063 1986 MARY       390
    NA      NA <NA>        NA
    NA.1    NA <NA>        NA
    NA.2    NA <NA>        NA
    NA.3    NA <NA>        NA

Those rows at the top of each output aren't even the highest in terms of Frequency.

share|improve this question
    
Right off the bat, require(stringr) should be in the function body. Not relevant to your problem, just an observation –  Richard Scriven May 2 at 5:57
    
I would at least use in place of ordered <- name.df[order(A$Frequency, decreasing = F),] try: ordered <- name.df[order(name.df$Frequency, decreasing = F), ]' because I don't know what A` looks like. –  Gary Weissman May 2 at 7:55
    
Thanks. Looks like that worked. Any chance you guys could explain what these lines do? g <- stringr::str_trim(A$Name)==toupper(name) and this line: name.df <- A[g,] –  simplycoding May 3 at 3:41

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