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I have to format std::string with sprintf and send it into file stream. How can I do this?

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25 Answers 25

up vote 91 down vote accepted

You can't do it directly, because you don't have write access to the underlying buffer. You'll have to do it first in a c-string, then copy it into a std::string:

  char buff[100];
  sprintf(buff, "%s", "Hello");
  std::string buffAsStdStr = buff;

But I'm not sure why you wouldn't just use a string stream? I'm assuming you have specific reasons to not just do this:

  std::ostringstream stringStream;
  stringStream << "Hello";
  std::string copyOfStr = stringStream.str();
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40  
Better use snprintf than sprintf. –  KennyTM Feb 26 '10 at 15:22
20  
@Hassan: Some people hate streams. Myself included. –  John Dibling Feb 26 '10 at 16:47
21  
@Hassan: Well, I could give you a bunch of reasons. One, streams are slow. Two, many implementations I have used are buggy as all get out. Three, I find it much easier & consise to do precise string formatting using sprintf. Four, I find the mechanism to reset & reuse a stream object clunky. But what it all comes down to is personal taste. I get that sprintf is not type safe and potentially dangerous with respect to buffer bugs. But jeez I hate streams! Don't get me wrong, I would never argue that someone should prefer sprintf; in fact quite the opposite. Just answering your question –  John Dibling Feb 26 '10 at 17:24
10  
streams are crappy and annoying for most basic tasks. over-objectifying and over-templating produces line noise when trying to debug or diagnose issues... but it's all we've got. i do understand the desire for a std::string sprintf. *** Copy the code from "make_message" and use it as a safe wrapper ... call it std::sprintf if you really want to. link –  Erik Aronesty Nov 11 '11 at 17:49
13  
The reason to use formats is to let a localizer rebuild the structure of the sentence for foreign languages, instead of hard coding the grammar of the sentence. –  Martijn Courteaux Jul 9 '13 at 14:51
#include <stdarg.h>  // For va_start, etc.

std::string string_format(const std::string fmt, ...) {
    int size = ((int)fmt.size()) * 2 + 50;   // Use a rubric appropriate for your code
    std::string str;
    va_list ap;
    while (1) {     // Maximum two passes on a POSIX system...
        str.resize(size);
        va_start(ap, fmt);
        int n = vsnprintf((char *)str.data(), size, fmt.c_str(), ap);
        va_end(ap);
        if (n > -1 && n < size) {  // Everything worked
            str.resize(n);
            return str;
        }
        if (n > -1)  // Needed size returned
            size = n + 1;   // For null char
        else
            size *= 2;      // Guess at a larger size (OS specific)
    }
    return str;
}

A safer and more efficient (I tested it, and it is faster) approach:

#include <stdarg.h>  // For va_start, etc.
#include <memory>    // For std::unique_ptr

std::string string_format(const std::string fmt_str, ...) {
    int final_n, n = ((int)fmt_str.size()) * 2; /* Reserve two times as much as the length of the fmt_str */
    std::string str;
    std::unique_ptr<char[]> formatted;
    va_list ap;
    while(1) {
        formatted.reset(new char[n]); /* Wrap the plain char array into the unique_ptr */
        strcpy(&formatted[0], fmt_str.c_str());
        va_start(ap, fmt_str);
        final_n = vsnprintf(&formatted[0], n, fmt_str.c_str(), ap);
        va_end(ap);
        if (final_n < 0 || final_n >= n)
            n += abs(final_n - n + 1);
        else
            break;
    }
    return std::string(formatted.get());
}

The fmt_str is passed by value to conform with the requirements of va_start.

NOTE: The safer and faster version doesn't work on some systems. Hence both are still listed. Also, "faster" depends entirely on the preallocation step being correct, otherwise the strcpy renders it slower.

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2  
slow. why increase size by 1? And when does this funciton return -1? –  0xDEAD BEEF May 18 '12 at 10:45
14  
You are overwriting str.c_str()? Isn't that dangerous? –  quantum Aug 22 '12 at 15:12
7  
va_start with a reference argument has problems on MSVC. It fails silently and returns pointers to random memory. As a workaround, use std::string fmt instead of std::string &fmt, or write a wrapper object. –  Steve Hanov Aug 27 '12 at 17:53
5  
I +1'd cause I know this will probably work based on how most std::strings are implemented, however c_str isn't really intended to be a place to modify the underlying string. Its supposed to be read-only. –  Doug T. Sep 25 '12 at 14:57
5  
And to obtain the resulting string length beforehand, see: stackoverflow.com/a/7825892/908336 I don't see the point in increasing size in each iteration, when you can obtain it by the first call of vsnprintf(). –  Massood Khaari May 15 '13 at 9:12

boost::format() provides the functionality you want:

As from the Boost format libraries synopsis:

A format object is constructed from a format-string, and is then given arguments through repeated calls to operator%. Each of those arguments are then converted to strings, who are in turn combined into one string, according to the format-string.

cout << boost::format("writing %1%,  x=%2% : %3%-th try") % "toto" % 40.23 % 50; 
     // prints "writing toto,  x=40.230 : 50-th try"
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17  
boost is to big for my project. –  Ockonal Feb 26 '10 at 15:22
29  
@Ockonal: Why? How is it "too big"? Boost.Format is a header-only library. It doesn't get much smaller than that. –  jalf Feb 26 '10 at 15:59
25  
any time i have a tool that requires boost i immediately get annoyed with all the version dependencies. which is the only reason i haven't tried using it. –  Erik Aronesty Nov 15 '11 at 17:34
6  
Same for me. I don't want to pull in the boost for every small project. –  denim Jul 5 '13 at 6:56
5  
boost is terrible and ugly when compared with stl –  Simple Fellow Sep 25 '13 at 7:46

If you only want a printf-like syntax (without calling printf yourself), have a look at Boost Format.

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[edit] Adapted to make use of the technique in Erik Aronesty's answer (above):

#include <string>
#include <cstdarg>
#include <cstdio>

//=============================================================================
void spf(std::string &s, const std::string fmt, ...)
{
    int n, size=100;
    bool b=false;
    va_list marker;

    while (!b)
    {
        s.resize(size);
        va_start(marker, fmt);
        n = vsnprintf((char*)s.c_str(), size, fmt.c_str(), marker);
        va_end(marker);
        if ((n>0) && ((b=(n<size))==true)) s.resize(n); else size*=2;
    }
}

//=============================================================================
void spfa(std::string &s, const std::string fmt, ...)
{
    std::string ss;
    int n, size=100;
    bool b=false;
    va_list marker;

    while (!b)
    {
        ss.resize(size);
        va_start(marker, fmt);
        n = vsnprintf((char*)ss.c_str(), size, fmt.c_str(), marker);
        va_end(marker);
        if ((n>0) && ((b=(n<size))==true)) ss.resize(n); else size*=2;
    }
    s += ss;
}

[previous answer]
A very late answer, but for those who, like me, do like the 'sprintf'-way: I've written and are using the following functions. If you like it, you can expand the %-options to more closely fit the sprintf ones; the ones in there currently are sufficient for my needs. You use stringf() and stringfappend() same as you would sprintf. Just remember that the parameters for ... must be POD types.

//=============================================================================
void DoFormatting(std::string& sF, const char* sformat, va_list marker)
{
    char *s, ch=0;
    int n, i=0, m;
    long l;
    double d;
    std::string sf = sformat;
    std::stringstream ss;

    m = sf.length();
    while (i<m)
    {
        ch = sf.at(i);
        if (ch == '%')
        {
            i++;
            if (i<m)
            {
                ch = sf.at(i);
                switch(ch)
                {
                    case 's': { s = va_arg(marker, char*);  ss << s;         } break;
                    case 'c': { n = va_arg(marker, int);    ss << (char)n;   } break;
                    case 'd': { n = va_arg(marker, int);    ss << (int)n;    } break;
                    case 'l': { l = va_arg(marker, long);   ss << (long)l;   } break;
                    case 'f': { d = va_arg(marker, double); ss << (float)d;  } break;
                    case 'e': { d = va_arg(marker, double); ss << (double)d; } break;
                    case 'X':
                    case 'x':
                        {
                            if (++i<m)
                            {
                                ss << std::hex << std::setiosflags (std::ios_base::showbase);
                                if (ch == 'X') ss << std::setiosflags (std::ios_base::uppercase);
                                char ch2 = sf.at(i);
                                if (ch2 == 'c') { n = va_arg(marker, int);  ss << std::hex << (char)n; }
                                else if (ch2 == 'd') { n = va_arg(marker, int); ss << std::hex << (int)n; }
                                else if (ch2 == 'l') { l = va_arg(marker, long);    ss << std::hex << (long)l; }
                                else ss << '%' << ch << ch2;
                                ss << std::resetiosflags (std::ios_base::showbase | std::ios_base::uppercase) << std::dec;
                            }
                        } break;
                    case '%': { ss << '%'; } break;
                    default:
                    {
                        ss << "%" << ch;
                        //i = m; //get out of loop
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        else ss << ch;
        i++;
    }
    va_end(marker);
    sF = ss.str();
}

//=============================================================================
void stringf(string& stgt,const char *sformat, ... )
{
    va_list marker;
    va_start(marker, sformat);
    DoFormatting(stgt, sformat, marker);
}

//=============================================================================
void stringfappend(string& stgt,const char *sformat, ... )
{
    string sF = "";
    va_list marker;
    va_start(marker, sformat);
    DoFormatting(sF, sformat, marker);
    stgt += sF;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@MooingDuck: Changed function parameter as per Dan's comment to Aronesty's answer. I use only Linux/gcc, and with fmt as reference it works fine. (But I suppose people will want to play with toys, so ...) If there are any other supposed 'bugs' could you please elaborate? –  slashmais Mar 12 '13 at 13:21
    
I misunderstood how part of his code worked and thought it was doing to many resizes. Reexamining shows that I was mistaken. Your code is correct. –  Mooing Duck Mar 12 '13 at 16:45

I wrote my own using vsnprintf so it returns string instead of having to create my own buffer.

#include <string>
#include <cstdarg>

//missing string printf
//this is safe and convenient but not exactly efficient
inline std::string format(const char* fmt, ...){
    int size = 512;
    char* buffer = 0;
    buffer = new char[size];
    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl, fmt);
    int nsize = vsnprintf(buffer, size, fmt, vl);
    if(size<=nsize){ //fail delete buffer and try again
        delete[] buffer;
        buffer = 0;
        buffer = new char[nsize+1]; //+1 for /0
        nsize = vsnprintf(buffer, size, fmt, vl);
    }
    std::string ret(buffer);
    va_end(vl);
    delete[] buffer;
    return ret;
}

So you can use it like

std::string mystr = format("%s %d %10.5f", "omg", 1, 10.5);
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This does a full extra copy of the data, it's possible to use vsnprintf directly into the string. –  Mooing Duck Mar 12 '13 at 16:47
1  
Use the code in stackoverflow.com/a/7825892/908336 to obtain the resulting string length beforehand. And you can use smart pointers for an exception-safe code: std::unique_ptr<char[]> buffer (new char[size]); –  Massood Khaari May 15 '13 at 9:19
    
This is awesome and works perfectly for me. Thank you! –  Richard Żak Jul 3 '13 at 19:04
    
I'm not sure this is correct in the fallback case; I think you need to do a va_copy of vl for the second vsnprintf() to see the arguments correctly. For an example see: github.com/haberman/upb/blob/… –  Josh Haberman Nov 2 '13 at 18:25

string doesn't have what you need, but std::stringstream does. Use a stringstream to create the string and then extract the string. Here is a comprehensive list on the things you can do. For example:

cout.setprecision(10); //stringstream is a stream like cout

will give you 10 decimal places of precision when printing a double or float.

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which still doesn't give you anything near the control printf gives you... but is nice. –  Erik Aronesty Aug 27 at 15:16

This is how google does it: StringPrintf (BSD License)
and facebook does it in a quite similar fashion: StringPrintf (Apache License)
Both provide with a convenient StringAppendF too.

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Unfortunately, most of the answers here use varargs which are inherently unsafe unless you use something like GCC's format attribute which only works with literal format strings. You can see why these functions are unsafe on the following example:

std::string format_str = "%s";
string_format(format_str, format_str[0]);

where string_format is an implementation from the Erik Aronesty's answer. This code compiles, but it will most likely crash when you try to run it:

$ g++ -Wall -Wextra -pedantic test.cc 
$ ./a.out 
Segmentation fault: 11

It is possible to implement a safe printf and extend it to format std::string using (variadic) templates. This has been done in the C++ Format library, which provides a safe alternative to sprintf returning std::string:

std::string format_str = "The answer is %d";
std::string result = fmt::sprintf(format_str, 42);

C++ Format keeps track of the argument types and and if the type doesn't match format specification there is no segmentation fault, just an exception.

Disclaimer: I'm the author of this library.

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Based on the answer provided by Erik Aronesty:

std::string string_format(const std::string &fmt, ...) {
    std::vector<char> str(100,'\0');
    va_list ap;
    while (1) {
        va_start(ap, fmt);
        auto n = vsnprintf(str.data(), str.size(), fmt.c_str(), ap);
        va_end(ap);
        if ((n > -1) && (size_t(n) < str.size())) {
            return str.data();
        }
        if (n > -1)
            str.resize( n + 1 );
        else
            str.resize( str.size() * 2);
    }
    return str.data();
}

This avoids the need to cast away const from the result of .c_str() which was in the original answer.

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inline void format(string& a_string, const char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list vl;
    va_start(vl, fmt);
    int size = _vscprintf( fmt, vl );
    a_string.resize( ++size );
    vsnprintf_s((char*)a_string.data(), size, _TRUNCATE, fmt, vl);
    va_end(vl);
}
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1  
+1 for the smart idea, but it's not very clear what _vscprintf is. I think you should elaborate on this answer. –  Dacav Oct 4 at 21:24

This is the code I use to do this in my program... It's nothing fancy, but it does the trick... Note, you will have to adjust your size as applicable. MAX_BUFFER for me is 1024.

std::string Format ( const char *fmt, ... )
{
    char textString[MAX_BUFFER*5] = {'\0'};

    // -- Empty the buffer properly to ensure no leaks.
    memset(textString, '\0', sizeof(textString));

    va_list args;
    va_start ( args, fmt );
    vsnprintf ( textString, MAX_BUFFER*5, fmt, args );
    va_end ( args );
    std::string retStr = textString;
    return retStr;
}
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3  
The initialization of textString already sets the whole buffer to zero. No need to memset... –  EricSchaefer Mar 3 '12 at 15:46
    
This does a full extra copy of the data, it's possible to use vsnprintf directly into the string. –  Mooing Duck Mar 12 '13 at 16:48

You could try this:

string str;
str.resize( _MAX_PATH );

sprintf( &str[0], "%s %s", "hello", "world" );
// optionals
// sprintf_s( &str[0], str.length(), "%s %s", "hello", "world" ); // Microsoft
// #include <stdio.h>
// snprintf( &str[0], str.length(), "%s %s", "hello", "world" ); // c++11

str.resize( strlen( str.data() ) + 1 );
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template<typename... Args>
std::string string_format(const char* fmt, Args... args)
{
    size_t size = snprintf(nullptr, 0, fmt, args...);
    std::string buf;
    buf.reserve(size + 1);
    buf.resize(size);
    snprintf(&buf[0], size + 1, fmt, args...);
    return buf;
}

Using C99 snprintf and C++11

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Emphasising C++11 std::snprintf, this becomes a pretty easy task.

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdio>

using namespace std; //Don't if you're in a header-file

template<typename ... Args>
string string_format(const string& format, Args ... args){
    size_t size = snprintf(nullptr, 0, format.c_str(), args ...);
    unique_ptr<char[]> buf(new char[size]);
    snprintf(buf.get(), size, format.c_str(), args ...);
    return string(buf.get(), buf.get() + size);
}

Line by line explanation:

Aim: Write to a char* by using std::snprintf and then convert that to a std::string.

First, we determine the desired length of the char array.

From cppreference.com:

Return value

[...] If the resulting string gets truncated due to buf_size limit, function returns the total number of characters (not including the terminating null-byte) which would have been written, if the limit was not imposed.

Then, we allocate a new character array and assign it to a std::unique_ptr. This is generally advised, as you won't have to manually delete it again.

Note that this is not a safe way to allocate a unique_ptr with user-defined types as you can not deallocate the memory if the constructor throws an exception!

After that, we can of course just use snprintf for its intended use and write the formatted string to the char[] and afterwards create and return a new std::string from that.


Additional information for Visual Studio users:

As explained in this answer, Microsoft renamed std::snprintf to _snprintf (yes, without std::). MS further set it as deprecated and advises to use _snprintf_s instead, so if your MSVC compiles on Warning Level /W3, which is the standard, you'll either have to use _snprintf_s or have to add the following line to the file which contains the use of _snprintf:

#pragma warning(disable : 4996)
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One solution I've favoured is to do this with sprintf directly into the std::string buffer, after making said buffer big enough:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

string l_output;
l_output.resize(100);

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
{       
    memset (&l_output[0], 0, 100);
    sprintf (&l_output[0], "\r%i\0", i);

    cout << l_output;
    cout.flush();
}

So, create the std::string, resize it, access its buffer directly...

share|improve this answer
    
Is this defined behaviour? It is pretty clear that this will most likely work, but is it actually allowed by the standard? –  iFreilicht Oct 6 at 17:48

You can format C++ output in cout using iomanip header file. Make sure that you include iomanip header file before you use any of the helper functions like setprecision, setfill etc.

Here is a code snippet I have used in the past to print the average waiting time in the vector, which I have "accumulated".

#include<iomanip>
#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<numeric>

...

cout<< "Average waiting times for tasks is " << setprecision(4) << accumulate(all(waitingTimes), 0)/double(waitingTimes.size()) ;
cout << " and " << Q.size() << " tasks remaining" << endl;

Here is a brief description of how we can format C++ streams. http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/iomanip.html

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My two cents on this very popular question.

To quote the manpage of printf-like functions:

Upon successful return, these functions return the number of characters printed (excluding the null byte used to end output to strings).

The functions snprintf() and vsnprintf() do not write more than size bytes (including the terminating null byte ('\0')). If the output was truncated due to this limit then the return value is the number of characters (excluding the terminating null byte) which would have been written to the final string if enough space had been available. Thus, a return value of size or more means that the output was truncated.

In other words, a sane C++11 implementation should be the following:

#include <string>
#include <cstdio>

template <typename... Ts>
std::string fmt (const std::string &fmt, Ts... vs)
{
    char b;
    unsigned required = std::snprintf(&b, 0, fmt.c_str(), vs...);
    char bytes[required];
    std::snprintf(bytes, required, fmt.c_str(), vs...);

    return std::string(bytes);
}

It works quite well :)

Variadic templates are supported only in C++11. The answer from pixelpoint show a similar technique using older programming styles.

It's weird that C++ does not have such a thing out of the box. They recently added to_string(), which in my opinion is a great step forward. I'm wondering if they will add a .format operator to the std::string eventually...

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There can be problems, if the buffer is not large enough to print the string. You must determine the length of the formatted string before printing a formatted message in there. I make own helper to this (tested on Windows and Linux GCC), and you can try use it.

String.cpp: http://pastebin.com/DnfvzyKP
String.h: http://pastebin.com/7U6iCUMa

String.cpp:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdarg>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

using ::std::string;

#pragma warning(disable : 4996)

#ifndef va_copy
#ifdef _MSC_VER
#define va_copy(dst, src) dst=src
#elif !(__cplusplus >= 201103L || defined(__GXX_EXPERIMENTAL_CXX0X__))
#define va_copy(dst, src) memcpy((void*)dst, (void*)src, sizeof(*src))
#endif
#endif

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param dst String to store formatted message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ap Variable argument list
///
void toString(string &dst, const char *format, va_list ap) throw() {
  int length;
  va_list apStrLen;
  va_copy(apStrLen, ap);
  length = vsnprintf(NULL, 0, format, apStrLen);
  va_end(apStrLen);
  if (length > 0) {
    dst.resize(length);
    vsnprintf((char *)dst.data(), dst.size() + 1, format, ap);
  } else {
    dst = "Format error! format: ";
    dst.append(format);
  }
}

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param dst String to store formatted message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ... Variable argument list
///
void toString(string &dst, const char *format, ...) throw() {
  va_list ap;
  va_start(ap, format);
  toString(dst, format, ap);
  va_end(ap);
}

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ... Variable argument list
///
string toString(const char *format, ...) throw() {
  string dst;
  va_list ap;
  va_start(ap, format);
  toString(dst, format, ap);
  va_end(ap);
  return dst;
}

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ap Variable argument list
///
string toString(const char *format, va_list ap) throw() {
  string dst;
  toString(dst, format, ap);
  return dst;
}


int main() {
  int a = 32;
  const char * str = "This works!";

  string test(toString("\nSome testing: a = %d, %s\n", a, str));
  printf(test.c_str());

  a = 0x7fffffff;
  test = toString("\nMore testing: a = %d, %s\n", a, "This works too..");
  printf(test.c_str());

  a = 0x80000000;
  toString(test, "\nMore testing: a = %d, %s\n", a, "This way is cheaper");
  printf(test.c_str());

  return 0;
}

String.h:

#pragma once
#include <cstdarg>
#include <string>

using ::std::string;

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param dst String to store formatted message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ap Variable argument list
///
void toString(string &dst, const char *format, va_list ap) throw();
///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param dst String to store formatted message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ... Variable argument list
///
void toString(string &dst, const char *format, ...) throw();
///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ... Variable argument list
///
string toString(const char *format, ...) throw();

///
/// \breif Format message
/// \param format Format of message
/// \param ap Variable argument list
///
string toString(const char *format, va_list ap) throw();
share|improve this answer

I gave it a try, with regular expressions. I implemented it for ints and const strings as an example, but you can add whatever other types (POD types but with pointers you can print anything).

#include <assert.h>
#include <cstdarg>

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <regex>

static std::string
formatArg(std::string argDescr, va_list args) {
    std::stringstream ss;
    if (argDescr == "i") {
        int val = va_arg(args, int);
        ss << val;
        return ss.str();
    }
    if (argDescr == "s") {
        const char *val = va_arg(args, const char*);
        ss << val;
        return ss.str();
    }
    assert(0); //Not implemented
}

std::string format(std::string fmt, ...) {
    std::string result(fmt);
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    std::regex e("\\{([^\\{\\}]+)\\}");
    std::smatch m;
    while (std::regex_search(fmt, m, e)) {
        std::string formattedArg = formatArg(m[1].str(), args);
        fmt.replace(m.position(), m.length(), formattedArg);
    }
    va_end(args);
    return fmt;
}

Here is an example of use of it:

std::string formatted = format("I am {s} and I have {i} cats", "bob", 3);
std::cout << formatted << std::endl;

Output:

I am bob and I have 3 cats

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this can be tried out. simple. really does not use nuances of the string class though.

#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <assert.h>

#include <string>
#include <exception>
using namespace std;

//---------------------------------------------------------------------

class StringFormatter
{
public:
    static string format(const char *format, ...);
};

string StringFormatter::format(const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list  argptr;

    va_start(argptr, format);

        char   *ptr;
        size_t  size;
        FILE   *fp_mem = open_memstream(&ptr, &size);
        assert(fp_mem);

        vfprintf (fp_mem, format, argptr);
        fclose (fp_mem);

    va_end(argptr);

    string ret = ptr;
    free(ptr);

    return ret;
}

//---------------------------------------------------------------------

int main(void)
{
    string temp = StringFormatter::format("my age is %d", 100);
    printf("%s\n", temp.c_str());

    return 0;
}
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Poco Foundation library has a very convenient format function, which supports std::string in both the format string and the values:

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A not so well known GNU C++ library is autosprintf. Its usage is very simple:

#include <iostream>
#include "autosprintf.h"
using gnu::autosprintf;

int main( )
{
    std::cerr << autosprintf ("syntax error in %s:%d: %s", filename, line, errstring);

    return 0;
}

And don't forget to link -lasprintf. It is VERY lightweight. You may be able to find its implementation here.

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For Visual C:

std::wstring stringFormat(const wchar_t* fmt, ...)
{
    if (!fmt) {
        return L"";
    }

    std::vector<wchar_t> buff;
    size_t size = wcslen(fmt) * 2;
    buff.resize(size);
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    while (true) {
        int ret = _vsnwprintf_s(buff.data(), size, _TRUNCATE, fmt, ap);
        if (ret != -1)
            break;
        else {
            size *= 2;
            buff.resize(size);
        }
    }
    va_end(ap);
    return std::wstring(buff.data());
}
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Here my (simple solution):

std::string Format(const char* lpszFormat, ...)
{
    // Warning : "vsnprintf" crashes with an access violation
    // exception if lpszFormat is not a "const char*" (for example, const string&)

    size_t  nSize     = 1024;
    char    *lpBuffer = (char*)malloc(nSize);

    va_list lpParams;

    while (true)
    {
        va_start(lpParams, lpszFormat);

        int nResult = vsnprintf(
            lpBuffer,
            nSize,
            lpszFormat,
            lpParams
        );

        va_end(lpParams);

        if ((nResult >= 0) && (nResult < (int)nSize) )
        {
            // Success

            lpBuffer[nResult] = '\0';
            std::string sResult(lpBuffer);

            free (lpBuffer);

            return sResult;
        }
        else
        {
            // Increase buffer

            nSize =
                  (nResult < 0)
                ? nSize *= 2
                : (nResult + 1)
            ;

            lpBuffer = (char *)realloc(lpBuffer, nSize);
        }
    }
}
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