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I am stuck at the very basics. It's not homework, I'm just presenting the problem in a simplistic way.

I need a matrix print function, and the matrix is passed as an argument along with row and col count information. The matrix is allocated on the stack.

In function prototype mentioned below MAT_COL is a compile time define.

void matrix_print(uint8_t (*mat)[MAT_COL], int row, int col)

and print matrix elements as

print mat[i_row][i_col];

The approach will not work if I have multiple matrix with different sizes i,e "MAT_COL" is no more available.

One possible way out would be

void matrix_print(uint8_t *in_mat, int row, int col)
{
    uint8_t (*mat)[col] = in_mat;          // typecast "col" is an arg
    // access them as eariler
    print mat[i_row][i_col];
}

Any problems with this approach ? What is the standard solution to this problem in C.

share|improve this question
    
Did you try to Google it? Btw why did you tag to C++ if your are coding in C? –  Grijesh Chauhan May 2 '14 at 9:42
    
I did google it, but did not find any staisfactory answer. I am working in C, for arm platfrom with gcc cross compiler. –  ZEN.Kamath May 2 '14 at 9:46
    
Should not your parameter be of uint8_t** in_mat? No need to cast, you can access elements by in_mat[row][col]; –  Rakib May 2 '14 at 9:49
    
Why are you casting to an int when the pointer points to uint8_t? –  tangrs May 2 '14 at 9:49
1  
@RakibulHasan, OP's data set isn't an array of pointers. –  tangrs May 2 '14 at 9:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

C99 supports the following way of function declaration:

void matrix_print(int row, int col, uint8_t in_mat[row][col])
share|improve this answer

I think you could go for a structure to help yuo with handling the type. If the type is relevant to your Design you should make it explicit.

The following is an Ansi-C Version since you wrote C/C++ as a tag. In C++ you would make your matrix a class.

typedef struct
{
    int * data;
    int IsAllocated;
    unsigned row_max;
    unsigned col_max;
} Matrix;

void Matrix_construct(Matrix * m, int cols, int rows);
void Matrix_destruct(Matrix * m, int cols, int rows);
static int Private_GetElement(Matrix * m, unsigned col, unsigned row, int * element);
void Matrix_print(Matrix * m);

void Matrix_construct(Matrix * m, int cols, int rows)
{
    m->col_max = cols;
    m->row_max = rows;
    m->data = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int) * cols * rows);
    m->IsAllocated = 1;
}

void Matrix_destruct(Matrix * m, int cols, int rows)
{
    m->col_max = 0;
    m->row_max = 0;
    if(m->IsAllocated)
    {
        free(m->data);
        m->IsAllocated = 0;
    }
}

static int Private_GetElement(Matrix * m, unsigned col, unsigned row, int * element)
{
    int e = 0;
    if(m && element && col < m->col_max && row < m->row_max && m->IsAllocated)
    {
        *element = m->data[col + row * m->col_max];
    }
    else
    {
        e |= 1;
    }
    return e;
}

void Matrix_print(Matrix * m)
{
    unsigned col, row;
    int element;
    for( col = 0; col < m->col_max; ++col)
    {
        for( row = 0; row < m->row_max; ++row)
        {
            if(!Private_GetElement(m, col, row, &element))
            {
                printf("%i", element);
            }
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

If you allocate different sizes in Matrix_construct the printing would still work since Matrix_print uses the maximum values that are stored in the structure.

Using different sizes would lead to changing the structure in the above example, the Matrix_print should still work as expected.


EDIT:

The example was edited to show how dynamic allocation of variable sizes would look like.

share|improve this answer
1  
OP stated that he wants dynamically sized matrix. –  this May 2 '14 at 10:34
    
will edit the example to show how this is done –  Johannes May 2 '14 at 10:41

I have made an "ultimate" solution to this problem in gcc C11/C99 using these links:

http://c-faq.com/aryptr/dynmuldimary.html

http://c-faq.com/aryptr/ary2dfunc3.html

//compile with gcc --std=c11 program.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define MV(array, ncolumns, i, j) array[i * ncolumns + j]
#define MX 9
#define MY 14

void input_matrix(int row, int column, double matrix[row][column]);
void print_matrix(int row, int column, double matrix[row][column]);

int main()
{
    int i=MX, j=MY;
    printf("Generate input values and print matrices with functions fn(int w, int k, double matrix[w][k]) (in C99 and C11)\n");
    double matrix1[i][j];
    input_matrix(MX,MY,matrix1);
    printf("matrix static\n");
    print_matrix(MX,MY,matrix1);

    double **matrix2;
    matrix2=malloc(MX*sizeof(double*));
    matrix2[0] = (double *)malloc(MX*MY*sizeof(double));
    for(i = 1; i < MX; i++)
        matrix2[i] = matrix2[0]+i*MY;
    input_matrix(MX,MY,(double (*)[])(*matrix2));
    printf("matrix two times allocated one for pointers, the second for data (double (*)[])(m[0])\n");
    print_matrix(MX,MY,(double (*)[])(matrix2[0]));
    free(*matrix2);
    free(matrix2);

    double *matrix3;
    matrix3=malloc(MX*MY*sizeof(double));
    input_matrix(MX,MY,(double (*)[])matrix3);
    printf("matrix alocated as twodimensional array\n");
    print_matrix(MX,MY,(double (*)[])matrix3);
    free(matrix3);

    j=MY;
    double (*matrix4)[j];
    matrix4 = (double (*)[])malloc(MX * sizeof(*matrix4));
    input_matrix(MX,MY,matrix4);
    printf("matrix alocated as an array of pointers to arrays m = (double (*)[])malloc(MX * sizeof(*m))\n");
    print_matrix(MX,MY,matrix4);
    free(matrix4);
    printf("\nThe End!\n");
    return 0;
}

void input_matrix(int row, int column, double matrix[row][column]){
    for(int i=0; i<row; i++){
        for(int j=0; j<column; j++)
            matrix[i][j]=i+1;
    }
}

void print_matrix(int row, int column, double matrix[row][column]){
    for(int i=0; i<row; i++){
        for(int j=0; j<column; j++)
            printf("%.2lf ", matrix[i][j]);
        printf("\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I corrected your typecast from an int to a uint8_t so the following should indeed work.

void matrix_print(uint8_t *in_mat, int row, int col)
{
    uint8_t (*mat)[col] = (uint8_t (*)[col])in_mat;
    // access them like mat[y][x];
}

But if you're trying to avoid typecasts where available (which may or may not be good practice), you could implement it with offsets like so

void matrix_print(uint8_t *in_mat, int row, int col)
{
    // access them like mat[x + y*col];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why introduce casting and lose the type safety? –  this May 2 '14 at 10:35
    
I simply fixed the OP's version in the first code snippet (which would have given a type mismatch warning anyway). –  tangrs May 2 '14 at 11:25

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