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Given the following list:

List(List(1,2,3), List(4,5))

I would like to generate all the possible combinations. Using yield, it can be done as follows:

scala> for (x <- l.head; y <- l.last) yield (x,y)
res17: List[(Int, Int)] = List((1,4), (1,5), (2,4), (2,5), (3,4), (3,5))

But the problem I have is that the List[List[Int]] is not fixed; it can grow and shrink in size, so I never know how many for loops I will need in advance. What I would like is to be able to pass that list into a function which will dynamically generate the combinations regardless of the number of lists I have, so:

def generator (x : List[List[Int]) : List[List[Int]]

Is there a built-in library function that can do this. If not how do I go about doing this. Any pointers and hints would be great.

UPDATE:

The answer by @DNA blows the heap with the following (not so big) nested List structure:

List(

    List(0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 125, 130, 135, 140, 145, 150, 155, 160, 165, 170, 175, 180, 185, 190, 195, 200, 205, 210, 215, 220, 225, 230, 235, 240, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 275, 280, 285, 290, 295, 300), 
    List(0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, 300), 
    List(0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240, 260, 280, 300), 
    List(0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300), 
    List(0, 100, 200, 300), 
    List(0, 200), 
    List(0)

    )

Calling the generator2 function as follows:

generator2(
      List(
        List(0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 125, 130, 135, 140, 145, 150, 155, 160, 165, 170, 175, 180, 185, 190, 195, 200, 205, 210, 215, 220, 225, 230, 235, 240, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 275, 280, 285, 290, 295, 300),
        List(0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, 300),
        List(0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240, 260, 280, 300),
        List(0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300),
        List(0, 100, 200, 300),
        List(0, 200),
        List(0)
      )
    )

Is there a way to generate the cartesian product without blowing the heap?

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
    at scala.LowPriorityImplicits.wrapRefArray(LowPriorityImplicits.scala:73)
    at recfun.Main$.recfun$Main$$generator$1(Main.scala:82)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.immutable.List.foreach(List.scala:318)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$class.flatMap(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.AbstractTraversable.flatMap(Traversable.scala:105)
    at recfun.Main$.recfun$Main$$generator$1(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.immutable.List.foreach(List.scala:318)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$class.flatMap(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.AbstractTraversable.flatMap(Traversable.scala:105)
    at recfun.Main$.recfun$Main$$generator$1(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.immutable.List.foreach(List.scala:318)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$class.flatMap(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.AbstractTraversable.flatMap(Traversable.scala:105)
    at recfun.Main$.recfun$Main$$generator$1(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at recfun.Main$$anonfun$recfun$Main$$generator$1$1.apply(Main.scala:83)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$$anonfun$flatMap$1.apply(TraversableLike.scala:251)
    at scala.collection.immutable.List.foreach(List.scala:318)
    at scala.collection.TraversableLike$class.flatMap(TraversableLike.scala:251)
share|improve this question
    
What would be your desired output for a list containing three lists, e.g. List(List(1,2,3), List(4,5), List(6, 7)) ? – lpiepiora May 2 '14 at 10:35
    
It would be the cartesian product. So List(List(1,4,6), List(1,4,7), List(1,5,6), List(1,5,7)...) and so on... – Mika'il May 2 '14 at 11:34
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's a recursive solution:

  def generator(x: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = x match {
    case Nil    => List(Nil)
    case h :: _ => h.flatMap(i => generator(x.tail).map(i :: _))
  }

which produces:

val a = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5))       
val b = List(List(1, 2, 3), List(4, 5), List(6, 7))

generator(a)    //> List(List(1, 4), List(1, 5), List(2, 4), 
                //| List(2, 5), List(3, 4), List(3, 5))
generator(b)    //> List(List(1, 4, 6), List(1, 4, 7), List(1, 5, 6), 
                //| List(1, 5, 7), List(2, 4, 6), List(2, 4, 7),
                //| List(2, 5, 6), List(2, 5, 7), Listt(3, 4, 6), 
                //| List(3, 4, 7), List(3, 5, 6), List(3, 5, 7))

Update: the second case can also be written as a for comprehension, which may be a little clearer:

def generator2(x: List[List[Int]]): List[List[Int]] = x match {
  case Nil    => List(Nil)
  case h :: t => for (j <- generator2(t); i <- h) yield i :: j
}

Update 2: for larger datasets, if you run out of memory, you can use Streams instead (if it makes sense to process the results incrementally). For example:

def generator(x: Stream[Stream[Int]]): Stream[Stream[Int]] = 
  if (x.isEmpty) Stream(Stream.empty) 
  else x.head.flatMap(i => generator(x.tail).map(i #:: _))

// NB pass in the data as Stream of Streams, not List of Lists
generator(input).take(3).foreach(x => println(x.toList))

>List(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)
>List(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 200, 0)
>List(0, 0, 0, 0, 100, 0, 0)
share|improve this answer
    
For small nested lists your solution works fine but for some reason for a slightly bigger nested list, it blows up. I've updated the question with exact nested list that blew the stack. – Mika'il May 2 '14 at 21:28
    
Interesting - it works fine for me, returning 1694336 results. – DNA May 2 '14 at 21:30
    
Strange - I've updated the post with how I am calling generator2(). Is it any different to what you are doing? – Mika'il May 2 '14 at 21:39
    
I added the inner lists one by one. When adding the 5th inner list, it blows up. Just can't see why. The list is not that big, well within normally computing power and memory. – Mika'il May 2 '14 at 21:43
1  
OK, you are running out of heap (OutOfMemoryError) not stack (StackOverflowError). You probably just need to allocate more memory to your JVM using the -Xmx option – DNA May 2 '14 at 21:48

Feels like your problem can be described in terms of recursion:

If you have n lists of int: list1 of size m and list2, ... list n

  • generate the X combinations for list2 to n (so n-1 lists)
  • for each combination, you generate m new ones for each value of list1.
  • the base case is a list of one list of int, you just split all the elements in singleton lists.

so with List(List(1,2), List(3), List(4, 5)) the result of your recursive call is List(List(3,4),List(3,5)) and for each you add 2 combinations: List(1,3,4), List(2,3,4), List(1,3,5), List(2,3,5).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I just thought of that as well. I'm creating a function which will take a type List[List[Int]], and recursively go through the list, picking the lists one at time and getting their product, then getting the next list and generating the product with the previously computed product. So, ((List1 x List 2) x List 3)... and so on. – Mika'il May 2 '14 at 12:16

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