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According to the documentation, an exec does not modify the pid of a process.

I'm using a service to lauch my process, and aim to get his pid to save him in /var/run/. For that i use $!.

My init script make a call to a .sh file that does an exec to an other .sh file. This file then make an exec call to java.

In the end, the pid the java app has is not the one I get in my init script. Why ?

Note : when i make only one sh script that does exec java, that works. But I don't see why adding one exec would change anything.

Code if it can help understanding.

Init script:

$DAEMON > /var/local/red5/log/jvm.stdout 2>&1 &
RETVAL=$?
if [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ]; then
        echo $! > $PIDFILE
fi

$DAEMON calls :

if [ -z "$RED5_HOME" ]; then export RED5_HOME=`pwd`; fi
ulimit -n 32767
# start Red5
exec /bin/bash $RED5_HOME/red5.sh > $RED5_HOME/log/jvm.stdout 2>&1 &

And my red5.sh calls java : (with a few exports before that)

# start Red5
exec "$JAVA" "$JYTHON" -Dred5.root="${RED5_HOME}" $JAVA_OPTS -cp "${RED5_CLASSPATH}" "$RED5_MAINCLASS" $RED5_OPTS

Works if i do :

if [ -z "$RED5_HOME" ]; then export RED5_HOME=`pwd`; fi
ulimit -n 32767
# start Red5
exec "$JAVA" "$JYTHON" -Dred5.root="${RED5_HOME}" $JAVA_OPTS -cp "${RED5_CLASSPATH}" "$RED5_MAINCLASS" $RED5_OPTS

Result :

  1. pid via ps -ef: 15950.
  2. pid with $! : 15947

Any idea ? Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Would please ps and grep both these pids and paste the output here. –  Jord May 2 at 13:03
1  
When you run $DAEMON asynchronously, there is no need to check $?. According to the standard, "The exit status of an asynchronous list shall be zero." –  William Pursell May 2 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your original $DAEMON is starting another new process when you call exec as a background process, so your Java program does run in a separate process than the background process started in the init script. Just run exec with

if [ -z "$RED5_HOME" ]; then export RED5_HOME=`pwd`; fi
ulimit -n 32767
# start Red5

# CHANGE: no ampersand at the end of this line
exec /bin/bash $RED5_HOME/red5.sh > $RED5_HOME/log/jvm.stdout 2>&1
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good catch. Ampersands are so tiny, yet so powerful! –  William Pursell May 2 at 13:11
    
That's it thank you. Did not though about background changing process pid. –  Sagara May 3 at 13:46

You submit your job in the background when appending a & character, and thus it gets its own new pid.

EDIT: Thanks for the downvote. I meant this line:

exec /bin/bash $RED5_HOME/red5.sh > $RED5_HOME/log/jvm.stdout 2>&1 &
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