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So I have the following snippet of code:

private Nullable<decimal> _excessWages;
public decimal ExcessWages
{
    get
    {
        return _excessWages ?? CalculateExcessWages();
    }
    set
    {
        if (value != CalculateExcessWages())
            _excessWages = value;
        else
            _excessWages = null;
    }
}

So basically the behavior I'm trying to implement is if a field is left blank or is assigned a value equal the calculated one use the calculated value, otherwise store the assigned value.

I have a lot of fields that need to support overriding like this. Is this the best way to accomplish this? If not what would you suggest?

share|improve this question
    
What is it that you are actually asking about; I see that the property is declared as virtual, but from the text I get it that you are more asking about the code construct inside the setter? –  Fredrik Mörk Feb 26 '10 at 16:14
    
Sorry about that. I removed the virtual. It's not what I'm interested in. I'm concerned with 'overridable' from the end-user's perspective. –  Kenneth Cochran Feb 26 '10 at 16:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I worked on this a bit based mostly on Vlad's suggestion. Turns out you can use a single generic class to abstract this. Here is the end result:

public class Overridable<T>
{
    private Func<T> _calculate;
    private readonly Func<T, T, bool> _compare;
    protected T _t;

    public Overridable(Func<T> calculate, Func<T, T, bool> compare)
    {
        _calculate = calculate;
        _compare = compare;
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get { return _compare(_t, default(T)) ? _calculate() : _t; }
        set { _t = _compare(value, _calculate()) ? default(T) : value; }
    }
}

You need to pass in a compare delegate because the type isn't known until you set it in a subclass. So a simple == isn't going to cut it. I went the easy route and used a Func delegate but this could be replaced with a normal delegate if it had to be adapted for .NET 2.0 for some reason.

You'll notice I'm using default(T) instead of null. This works because the default value for a Nullable<T> is null (or more precisely, undefined but it works out to be the same).

This doesn't prevent you from trying to declare an Overridable<T> for a non-nullable type. What you'd wind up with won't through run time errors but it isn't as useful. Trying to set a Overridable<decimal>.Value to null will get you a compiler error. While setting it to default(decimal) will cause it to revert to calculating the value.

I went this route because the properties from this the class I'm using this in needs to populate a serializable object thats eventually transmitted as xml. The schema for the xml includes numeric fields defined as a mixture of integers, decimals and strings.

You then use the Overriddable class like so:

private Overridable<decimal?> _excessWages =
   new Overridable<decimal?>(CalculateExcessWages, (x,y) => x == y);
public virtual decimal? ExcessWages
{
    get
    {
        return _excessWages.Value;
    }
    set
    {
        _excessWages.Value = value;
    }
}

The only problem I ran into with this was that CalculateExcessWages is a non-static method so it can't be used in a field initializer. Since all the properties in my class are non-static I had to initialize all the backing fields in the constructor.

share|improve this answer

You can make a class wrapper for this.

class OverridableValue<T>
{
    public OverridableValue<T>(Func<T> calculator)
    {
        _calculator = calculator;
    }
    private Nullable<T> _t;
    private Func<T> _calculator;
    public T Get()
    {
        return return _t ?? _calculator();
    }
    public void Set(T value)
    {
        _t = (value != _calculator()) ? value : null;
    }
}

It's not so syntactically sweet, but at least saves some keystrokes.

Now you can use it like this:

class Foo
{
    OverridableValue<decimal> _excessWages =
            new OverridableValue<decimal>(CalculateExcessWages);
    public decimal ExcessWages
    {
        get { return _excessWages.Get(); }
        set { _excessWages.Set(value); }
    }
    ...
}

The advantage is that the whole logic is hidden at the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all the overridable properties are value types so I'd need to modify this so '_t' can be assigned any type, not just nullable. –  Kenneth Cochran Feb 26 '10 at 16:56
    
you would need basically 2 generics: one with where T: class, and one for value types. –  Vlad Feb 26 '10 at 16:59

You could do this by defining a handy set/get helper method

private static T GetUtil<T>(ref Nullable<T> value, Func<T> calc) {
  return value ?? calc();
}

private static void SetUtil<T>(ref Nullable<T> value, T newValue, Func<T> calc) {
  if ( newValue != calc() ) {
    value = newValue
  } else {
    value = null;
  }
}

private Nullable<decimal> _excessWages;
public decimal ExcessWages
{
    get { return GetUtil(ref _excessWages, CalculateExcessWages); }
    set { SetUtil(ref _excessWages, value CalculateExcessWages); }
}
share|improve this answer

That looks reasonable to my eyes. The only change I might make is to cache CalculateExcessWages(), if it is expensive to do, and ok to cache:

private Nullable<decimal> _excessWages;
private Nullable<decimal> _excessWagesCalculated;
public virtual decimal ExcessWages
{
    get
    {
        if (_excessWagesCalculated == null)
            _excessWagesCalculated = CalculateExcessWages();
        return _excessWages ?? _excessWagesCalculated;
    }
    set
    {
        if (_excessWagesCalculated == null)
            _excessWagesCalculated = CalculateExcessWages();
        if (value != _excessWagesCalculated)
            _excessWages = value;
        else
            _excessWages = null;
    }
}

But, this is more code than yours, and I think you are looking to simplify.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, interesting. That may or may not be a problem. Many of these overridable properties are calculated from other overridable properties, which are calculated from others, etc. So a property would be setting off a chain of calculations each time its accessed or changed. This would happen when loading an object from a database, the user overrides one of the properties or the user prints a report or serializes the object. Something to think about. –  Kenneth Cochran Feb 26 '10 at 16:46

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