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What's the Haskell equivalent pattern for if fall through in imperative languages, like:

function f (arg, result) {
    if (arg % 2 == 0) {
     result += "a"
    }

    if (arg % 3 == 0) {
     result += "b"
    }

    if (arg % 5 == 0) {
     result += "c"
    }

    return result
}
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You could use the State monad to do this –  Jan Dvorak May 2 '14 at 14:53
8  
Answers to this question will be muddied. You are asking about a series of if constructs but embedded in your example is mutable memory, which is a very different beast in Haskell. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson May 2 '14 at 15:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Instead of using the State monad, you can also use the Writer monad and take advantage of String's Monoid instance (really [a]'s Monoid instance):

import Control.Monad.Writer

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg result = execWriter $ do
    tell result
    when (arg `mod` 2 == 0) $ tell "a"
    when (arg `mod` 3 == 0) $ tell "b"
    when (arg `mod` 5 == 0) $ tell "c"

Which I think is pretty succinct, clean, and simple.


One advantage this has over the State monad is that you can rearrange order in which concatenations happen by just rearranging the lines. So for example, if you wanted to run f 30 "test" and get out "atestbc", all you have to do is swap the first two lines of the do:

f arg result = execWriter $ do
    when (arg `mod` 2 == 0) $ tell "a"
    tell result
    when (arg `mod` 3 == 0) $ tell "b"
    when (arg `mod` 5 == 0) $ tell "c"

Whereas in the State monad you'd have to change the operation:

f arg = execState $ do
    when (arg `mod` 2 == 0) $ modify ("a" ++)
    when (arg `mod` 3 == 0) $ modify (++ "b")
    when (arg `mod` 5 == 0) $ modify (++ "c")

So instead of having a relationship between execution order and order in the output string, you have to examine the actual operations closely (there's a subtle difference between (++ "a") and ("a" ++)), while the Writer code is very clear at first glance in my opinion.


As @JohnL has pointed out, this is not exactly an efficient solution since concatenation on Haskell Strings is not very fast, but you could pretty easily use Text and Builder to get around this:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import Data.Text.Lazy (Text)
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy as T
import qualified Data.Text.Lazy.Builder as B
import Control.Monad.Writer

f :: Int -> Text -> Text
f arg result = B.toLazyText . execWriter $ do
    tellText result
    when (arg `mod` 2 == 0) $ tellText "a"
    when (arg `mod` 3 == 0) $ tellText "b"
    when (arg `mod` 5 == 0) $ tellText "c"
    where tellText = tell . B.fromLazyText

And so there's no real change to the algorithm other than conversion to more efficient types.

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Lovely use of Writer! –  luqui May 2 '14 at 18:37
    
@luqui: the code looks nice but the performance won't scale. I'd probably prefer writing to an Endo String. Or if the OP wants to use Text instead of String, a Builder. This is why writing high-performance Haskell gets a bad rep... –  John L May 2 '14 at 19:38
    
@JohnL This is a problem with Haskell lists and the default String type, not with the algorithm. You could pretty easily switch to using Text and Builder since Builder implements Monoid as well. –  bheklilr May 2 '14 at 19:51
    
@JohnL See my edits for how to do this with Text and Builder. There's no real change to the code, so I don't see how this has anything to do with how it's difficult to write high performance code with Haskell in this scenario, other than having to know about Text and Builder. The problem that using Builder avoids is also present in imperative languages, since linked lists are not unique to Haskell. It all comes down to what data structure you're choosing to work with, and Haskell certainly lets you change structures more easily than more traditional languages. –  bheklilr May 2 '14 at 20:11
    
if I add another condition that if arg mod 7 == 0 then replace the result to "d", would this solution still be valid? I don't know how to that in Writer, but in State, you just modify it with const "d". –  Sawyer May 3 '14 at 7:17

The function can be written quite succinctly, provided that we're willing to somewhat obscure the logic of the original imperative version:

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg = (++ [c | (c, n) <- zip "abc" [2, 3, 5], mod arg n == 0])

Monad comprehensions can reproduce the original logic nicely:

{-# LANGUAGE MonadComprehensions #-}

import Data.Maybe
import Data.Monoid

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg res = maybe res (res++) $
        ["a" | mod arg 2 == 0]
    <>  ["b" | mod arg 3 == 0]
    <>  ["c" | mod arg 5 == 0]

However, it isn't a very commonly used language extension. Luckily for us (hat tip to Ørjan Johansen in the comments), there is already built-in comprehension sugar for the list monad, which we can also use here:

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg res = res ++ 
        ['a' | mod arg 2 == 0]
    ++  ['b' | mod arg 3 == 0]
    ++  ['c' | mod arg 5 == 0]
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3  
Actually ordinary list comprehensions will work similarly to your monad comprehensions as well: f arg res = res ++ ['a' | mod arg 2 == 0] ++ ['b' | mod arg 3 == 0] ++ ['c' | mod arg 5 == 0] –  Ørjan Johansen May 2 '14 at 15:47
    
@ØrjanJohansen, uh, I completely forgot (even though I personally abused this trick a few times). I'll include this in my answer. –  András Kovács May 2 '14 at 16:08

Using the State monad as Jan Dvorak's comment suggested:

import Control.Monad.State

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg = execState $ do
  when (arg `mod` 2 == 0) $ modify (++ "a")
  when (arg `mod` 3 == 0) $ modify (++ "b")
  when (arg `mod` 5 == 0) $ modify (++ "c")
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3  
I suggest using the Writer monad instead, with tell instead of modify . flip (++). –  rightfold May 2 '14 at 16:08

I think the short answer is that the approach to fallthrough in Haskell is Monoids. Whenever you want to combine many things into one thing, think Monoids. Addition is a great example:

1 + 2 + 4 + 0 + 3 = 10.

When adding numbers, theres sort of a no-op value 0. You can always add it and it won't change the result. Monoids generalize this concept, and Haskell calls the no-op value mempty. This is how you drop items out of your combination (in your example, you're dropping the values that don't divide evenly). + is the combiner. Haskell calls it mappend. There's a shorthand symbol for it: <>.

Multiplication is a Monoid, and the mempty value is 1, the combiner is *.

Strings are also a Monoid. The mempty value is "", the combiner is ++;

So here's a very simple implementation of your function using Monoids:

import Data.Monoid

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg str = str <> modsBy 2 "a" <> modsBy 3 "b" <> modsBy 5 "c"
  where
    modsBy n v = if arg `mod` n == 0 then v else mempty

The neat thing is that since Monoids generalize the concept, you can generalize this function pretty easily so it builds up any Monoid, not just a string. You can for instance pass in a list of divisor, monoid pairs, and some initial monoid to start with, and whenever the divisor divides evenly, you add the monoid:

f :: Monoid a => Int -> a -> [(Int, a)] -> a
f arg initial pairs = initial <> mconcat (map modsBy pairs)
  where
    modsBy (n, v) = if arg `mod` n == 0 then v else mempty

mconcat just combines a list of Monoids together.

So your initial example could now be run like:

> f 10 "foo" [(2,"a"), (3,"b"), (5,"c")]
"fooac"

But you could just as easily build up a number:

> f 10 1 [(2,1), (3,2), (5,3)]
5

One of the great things about Haskell is it captures and generalizes a lot of concepts I didn't even realize were there. Monoids come in really handy, and whole app architectures can be built on them.

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There's quite a few ways to do this. One thing you could do is represent each if as a function from Int -> Maybe Char and then concatenate a list of Maybe Char into the final string:

maybeMod :: Int -> a -> Int -> Maybe a
maybeMod d v i = if i `mod` d == 0 then Just v else Nothing

f :: Int -> String
f i = mapMaybe ($ i) [maybeMod 2 'a', maybeMod 3 'b', maybeMod 5 'c']
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I'd go for Int -> a -> Int -> [a] so that I can use ++ (or concat) instead of catMaybes –  Jan Dvorak May 2 '14 at 15:07
1  
You can use mapMaybe instead of catMaybes $ map. –  raymonad May 2 '14 at 15:17
    
@raymonad - Thanks for the suggestion. –  Lee May 2 '14 at 15:25

IMO you should tackle this different entirely. You're testing a series of very similar conditions; those should be kept together, not spread over a bunch of conditionals with no obvious relation. Why not put them in a list! Because each mod option should trigger another signal character you want an association list. So you start with [(2,'a'),(3,'b'),(5,'c')]. (if it's more of these, e.g. 10, use take 10 $ zip primes ['a'..], with a list of all prime numbers!)

Now we need, for each of the entries, to decide: if the given number is divisable by the prime, return the character, else don't add anything. That's a very succinct list comprehension:

f :: Int -> String
f arg = [ signal | (signal, n) <- [(2,'a'),(3,'b'),(5,'c')]
                 , arg `mod` n == 0                         ]
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import Control.Arrow

f :: Int -> String -> String
f arg = (if arg `mod` 2 == 0 then (++"a") else id) >>>
        (if arg `mod` 3 == 0 then (++"b") else id) >>>
        (if arg `mod` 5 == 0 then (++"c") else id)

In this case, >>> is just flip (.).

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