Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A legacy app is in an endless loop at startup; I don't know why/how yet (code obfuscation contest candidate), but regarding the method that's being called over and over (which is called from several other methods), I thought, "I wonder if one of the methods that calls this is also calling another method that also calls it?"

I thought: "Nah, the compiler would be able to figure that out, and not allow it, or at least emit a warning!"

So I created a simple app to prove that would be the case:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        method1();
    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        method2();
    }

    private void method1()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("method1 called, which will now call method2");
        method2();
    }

    private void method2()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("method2 called, which will now call method1");
        // Note to self: Write an article entitled, "Copy-and-Paste Considered Harmful"
        method1();
    }
}

...but no! It compiles just fine. Why wouldn't the compiler flag this code as questionable at best? If either button is mashed, you are in never-never land!

Okay, sometimes you may want an endless loop (pacemaker code, etc.), but still I think a warning should be emitted.

share|improve this question
17  
The most basic thing of any graphical user interface is based on an endless loop, an event loop. There is really no reason why the compiler should warn you about this because there are many useful situations for this. And also, your code isn’t endlessly looping, it’s interrupted by message boxes. –  poke May 2 '14 at 17:23
5  
Detecting an endless loop in general is undecidable. It's a consequence of Rice's theorem. –  CommuSoft May 2 '14 at 17:24
4  
I didn't even know Condoleeza was a coder. Or did you mean Jerry? –  B. Clay Shannon May 2 '14 at 17:26
4  
That's not an endless loop, but an endless recursion. And this is much worse, since it leads to a stack overflow. An endless recursion is never desired, unless you are programming malware. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 2 '14 at 17:28
5  
@B.ClayShannon That is also an insolvable problem. You're attempting to solve the halting problem, a famously proved unsolvable problem. –  Servy May 2 '14 at 17:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

That's not an endless loop, but an endless recursion. And this is much worse, since they can lead to a stack overflow. Endless recursions are not desired in most languages, unless you are programming malware. Endless loops, however, are often intentional. Services typically run in endless loops.

In order to detect this kind of situation, the compiler would have to analyze the code by following the method calls; however the C# compiler limits this process to the immediate code within the current method. Here, uninitialized or unused variables can be tracked and unreachable code can be detected, for instance. There is a tradeoff to make between the compiling speed and the depth of static analysis and optimizations.

Also it is hardly possible to know the real intention of the programmer.

Imagine that you wrote a method that is perfectly legal. Suddenly because you are calling this method from another place, your compiler complains and tells you that your method is no more legal. I can already see the flood of posts on SO like: "My method compiled yesterday. Today it does not compile any more. But I didn't change it".

share|improve this answer
    
That's more like a circular reference recursion (I mean OP's posted code). –  Rahul May 2 '14 at 17:45
    
This is just a special case of a recursion. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 2 '14 at 17:48
    
"it is hardly possible to know the real intention of the programmer" It's usually safe to assume the worst, it seems. –  B. Clay Shannon May 2 '14 at 17:55
3  
Some situations which might seem bad, can be intentional and still make sense in certain situations. The compiler is not intelligent in the human sense, it is just a machine. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 2 '14 at 18:14
3  
If compilers were to start complaining about bad code, dev computers all around the world would worn out on the sudden flood of warning messages. :) –  Crono May 2 '14 at 18:26
  1. As you said sometimes people want infinite loops. And the jit-compiler of .net supports tailcall optimization, so you might not even get a stack overflow for endless recursion like you did it.

  2. For the general case, predicting whether or not a program is going to terminate at some point or stuck in an infinite loop is impossible in finite time. It's called the halting problem. All a compiler can possibly find are some special cases, where it is easy to decide.

share|improve this answer

To put it very simply: it's not the compiler's job to question your coding patterns.

You could very well write a Main method that does nothing but throw an Exception. It's a far easier pattern to detect and a much more stupid thing to do; yet the compiler will happily allow your program to compile, run, crash and burn.

With that being said, since technically an endless loop / recursion is perfectly legal as far as the compiler is concerned, there's no reason why it should complain about it.

Actually, it would be very hard to figure out at compile time that the loop can't ever be broken at runtime. An exception could be thrown, user interaction could happen, a state might change somewhere on a specific thread, on a port you are monitoring, etc... there's way too much possibilities for any code analysis tool out there to establish, without any doubt, that a specific recursing code segment will inevitably cause an overflow at runtime.

I think the right way to prevent these situations is through unit testing organization. The more code paths you are covering in your tests, the less likely you are to ever face such a scenario.

share|improve this answer
    
“it's not the compiler's job to question your coding patterns” Isn't that exactly what warnings are for? To highlight coding patterns that are valid, but are very likely wrong. –  svick May 3 '14 at 17:34
1  
@svick it depends what you call a coding pattern. To me a var that's never assigned or an obsolete member being used aren't design issues. –  Crono May 3 '14 at 19:13

Because its nearly impossible to detect!

In the example you gave, it is obvious (to us) that the code will loop forever. But the compiler just sees a function call, it doesn't necessarily know at the time what calls that function, what conditional logic could change the looping behavior etc.

For example, with this slight change you aren't in an infinite loop anymore:

private bool method1called = false;
private void method1()
{
    MessageBox.Show("method1 called, which will now call method2");

    if (!method1called)
       method2();

    method1called = true;
}

private void method2()
{
    MessageBox.Show("method2 called, which will now call method1");
    method1();
}

Without actually running the program, how would you know that it isn't looping? I could potentially see a warning for while (true), but that has enough valid use cases that it also makes sense to not put a warning in for it.

A compiler is just parsing the code and translating to IL (for .NET anyways). You can get limited information like variables not being assigned while doing that (especially since it has to generate the symbol table anyways) but advanced detection like this is generally left to code analysis tools.

share|improve this answer

I found this on the Infinite Loop Wiki found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinite_loop#Intentional_looping

There are a few situations when this is desired behavior. For example, the games on cartridge-based game consoles typically have no exit condition in their main loop, as there is no operating system for the program to exit to; the loop runs until the console is powered off.

Antique punchcard-reading unit record equipment would literally halt once a card processing task was completed, since there was no need for the hardware to continue operating, until a new stack of program cards were loaded.

By contrast, modern interactive computers require that the computer constantly be monitoring for user input or device activity, so at some fundamental level there is an infinite processing idle loop that must continue until the device is turned off or reset. In the Apollo Guidance Computer, for example, this outer loop was contained in the Exec program, and if the computer had absolutely no other work to do it would loop running a dummy job that would simply turn off the "computer activity" indicator light.

Modern computers also typically do not halt the processor or motherboard circuit-driving clocks when they crash. Instead they fall back to an error condition displaying messages to the operator, and enter an infinite loop waiting for the user to either respond to a prompt to continue, or to reset the device.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.