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I made simple python program to generate big text file:

import sys
import random

f = open('data.txt', 'w')
for i in range(100000000):
        f.write(str(i) + "\t" + str(random.randint(0,1000)) + "\n")
f.close()

When I launch it using CPython it eat all available OS memory and write nothing to the file.

When I launch it on Jython I get OutOfMemoryException.

As far as I understand it stores everything in memory buffer and never did flush before close() call.

My question is: how to limit the file buffer and trigger autoflush? I don't want to callflush() manually, I think it's wrong from performance point of view. I want flush() to be called automatically when file buffer is overloaded or so.

Thanks!

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2  
Note that str(i) + "\t" + str(random.randint(0,1000)) + "\n" would usually be written %d\t%d\n" % (i, random.randint(0,1000)). This is a more common style, is more robust, and can have better performance. –  Mike Graham Feb 26 '10 at 18:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Buffering is not the problem. The problem is calling the range() function with a giant argument, which will attempt to allocate an array with lots of elements. You will get the same error if you just say

r = range(100000000)
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Thanks for quick answer, and could you give advise to python newbie, what's the python style to implement this properly? –  crypto5 Feb 26 '10 at 17:52
6  
try using for i in xrange(10000000). –  Autoplectic Feb 26 '10 at 17:54
2  
Change range to xrange –  Ned Batchelder Feb 26 '10 at 17:54
    
Thanks guys, it works! –  crypto5 Feb 26 '10 at 17:57

Have you tried passing in a buffer size to the open function?

f = open('data.txt', 'w', 5000)
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