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I'm trying to get a not-so complex if-else to work on my FreeBSD box but I'm getting error with the second part of the condition.

basically, this is what I'm trying to do

if not file-exists or (file-exists and string exists in file) then
 do this
else
 do something else 

this is the actual code I'm using

if [ ! -f /boot/loader.conf ] || [[ -f /boot/loader.conf ] && ! grep -Fqx "zfs_l
oad" /boot/loader.conf ]; then
                echo "found"
        else
                echo "not found"
fi

It gives me an error about "[[". I tried adding/removing brackets to no avail.

I've also searched the net for similar examples but the ones I've seen are very simplistic (i.e. if var=value then do this)

I could separate the conditions into 2 "ifs" but I think it can be done in 1 and I'm want to know "advance" if-else in bourne as well. :)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
FYI, /bin/sh on FreeBSD is POSIX sh, not Bourne. –  Charles Duffy May 2 '14 at 23:34
    
...Bourne is a shell from the 70s; POSIX sh is a ksh88-derived standard from the early 90s. There's a lot of difference between them, generally for the better. –  Charles Duffy May 2 '14 at 23:39
    
thanks. It's just that guides often equate /bin/sh = Bourne. You don't really see guides to posix sh scripting. They call it bourne scripting and that's what I've been using since. :) –  mrjayviper May 3 '14 at 0:53
    
Yup. I'm enough of a pedant to mistrust anyone who calls a guide to POSIX sh a Bourne guide to actually care about accuracy; there are lots of differences. (For instance, actual Bourne shells support using ^ as a pipe character). –  Charles Duffy May 3 '14 at 3:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use { ... } for grouping without the overhead and side-effects of a subshell (as created by ( ... )). [[ ]] is a different syntax, only available in ksh derivatives such as bash, which replaces [ ... ] with a less-error-prone alternative; it isn't available in baseline POSIX shells.

[ ! -f /boot/loader.conf ] || \
  { [ -f /boot/loader.conf ] && ! grep -Fqx "zfs_load" /boot/loader.conf; }
share|improve this answer
    
didn't know about using braces in if-else. I've also seen examples using brackets. thanks much :) –  mrjayviper May 2 '14 at 23:49

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