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I apologize for the badly worded title, but i cannot find a better way to describe my question.

I'm making a custom Degree class that will only hold any number between 0 and 360, any additions higher will be resolved down to their 0-360 equivalent. I was wondering if it was possible to do what primitive types do I.e Int a = 1.

I doubt this is possible, but if it is, how can i do it?

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1  
Int is not a type in java. There is only a class Integer and a primitive type int. Java is case-sensitive :) – vikingmaster May 3 '14 at 9:29
    
No, this is not possible in java, because auto boxing only applies to the built-in numeric types and there are no implicit constructors. – Dave May 3 '14 at 9:31
    
@Dave - Of course it's possible. They'll just have to make their own wrapper class. – Rudi Kershaw May 3 '14 at 9:33
    
And yes, you can create many setter methods which receive different arguments. public void set(Integer a) | public void set(Double a). It is called function overloading. – vikingmaster May 3 '14 at 9:33
    
you can not make assignment of any built in types to your class. because internally built in types in java have corresponding wrapper classes and automatically built in types will be assigned using wrapper class ie Integer x=8; but we cant do the same for our own class. to do so we can use some reflection concept but have to work around on this,but not possible directly. – Karibasappa G C May 3 '14 at 9:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is what you described would look like in Java. You will have to create a wrapper class which represents your degrees. Internally however, we will just be using an Integer object (or int primitive would work fine).

public class Degree {

    private Integer degrees;

    // Constructor, takes an Integer object or int primitive
    public Degree(Integer deg){
        setDegrees(deg);
    }
    // Get degrees from your wrapper object
    public Integer getDegrees(){
        return degrees;
    }
    // Set degress of your wrapper object
    public void setDegrees(Integer deg){
        if(deg<361 && deg>-1){ degrees = deg; }
        else if(deg>360){ degrees = 360; }
        else if(deg<0){ degrees = 0; }
    }
}

To use this in code somewhere else you would just use;

Degree d = new Degree(31);

You will probably want to override the toString(); method as well as the equals(); method, for ease of using your new Degree class. I hope this helps.


Edit: The behaviour where you declare a class and use the = operator to declare it a primitive is called autoboxing. A behaviour that has been possible since Java 5, but only works with a pre-set list of wrapper classes defined in the Java 5 specification.

That list includes Boolean, Byte, Short, Character, Integer, Long, Float, Double.

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1  
Thanks, this is pretty much what i have done already. – Lex Webb May 3 '14 at 9:49
    
I would suggest a factory method rather than a constructor, like the number types' valueOf. That leaves you free to have cached values, like 0, 90, etc. or cache-as-created. Of course, your class would need to be immutable, but that's good practice anyway. – Dave May 3 '14 at 9:54
    
You have doulbe code, in your constructor you could call setDegrees(deg); and remove the double code. – Vassilis Blazos May 3 '14 at 10:07
    
@VassilisB - Well spotted, correction made. – Rudi Kershaw May 3 '14 at 10:08

I decided i would post my finished class here in case anyone wanted it for reference.

public class Degree extends Number implements Comparable<Degree>{

    float degreeFloat;

    public Degree(){
        degreeFloat = 0;
    }

    public Degree(float degrees){
        this.set(degrees);
    }

    public Degree(int degrees){
        this.set(degrees);
    }

    public Degree(Degree degrees){
        this.set(degrees);
    }

    @Override
    public int intValue() {
        return (int)degreeFloat;
    }

    @Override
    public long longValue() {
        return (long)degreeFloat;
    }

    @Override
    public float floatValue() {
        return degreeFloat;
    }

    @Override
    public double doubleValue() {
        return (double)degreeFloat;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Degree compTo) {
        if(compTo.get() > degreeFloat)
            return 1;
        else if(compTo.get() < degreeFloat)
            return -1;
        else
            return 0;
    }

    public Boolean equals(Degree compTo){
        if(degreeFloat == compTo.get()) return true;
        else return false;
    }

    public float get(){
        return degreeFloat;
    }

    public void set(Degree setTo){
        this.degreeFloat = setTo.get();
    }

    public void set(float setTo){
        this.degreeFloat = setNormalise(setTo);
    }

    public void set(int setTo){
        this.degreeFloat = setNormalise((float)setTo);
    }

    public void set(double setTo){
        this.degreeFloat = setNormalise((float)setTo);
    }

    public float setNormalise(float setTo){
        float value = setTo;

        while(setTo > 360f)
            setTo -= 360F;

        while(setTo < 0f)
            setTo += 360f;

        return value;
    }
}
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1  
Some comments since you've posted this; you don't need to have overloaded versions for int/float/double; just provide float, since that's what you store anyway (implicit casting will cater for int, and it's worth warning about double). new Degree(0).equals( new Degree(360) ) will return false (actually you have a typo in setNormalise which means it will never actually normalise). And your compareTo isn't wrap-around aware (so 361 < 359). Of course, making it wrap-around aware is impossible, but maybe that means you shouldn't allow it? – Dave May 3 '14 at 11:25
    
I should also point out that your equals function won't always be used (e.g. if put in a Set or Map), because it should take an Object not a Degree (use the @Override annotation on it and you will be warned about this). Also I'd strongly recommend making the class immutable (make degreeFloat final and remove setters), which will make it much safer to use as a type inside other objects (can't be changed externally so doesn't need protective copies made). Sorry to throw such a list at you but these are common pitfalls which I think it's worth being aware of! – Dave May 3 '14 at 11:29
    
Both good points, i will make the changes – Lex Webb May 3 '14 at 16:03

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