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My Binary Search Tree destructor looks like this.

~BSTree()
{
    if (this == nullptr || this->left == nullptr && this->right == nullptr)
    {
        return;
    }
    this->left->~BSTree();
    delete this->left;
    this->right->~BSTree();
    delete this->right;
}

After the call stack gets about >= 4 calls my program crashes at the if() with the Access Voilation Exception.

My fields are only three: int key;,BSTree *left; and BSTree *right;

enter image description here

it seems that this is not NULL but its fields cannot be read from the memory. How do I check if they can and remove this; if not to prevent the exception?

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3  
Don't call the destructors by yourself. delete will do this for you. –  Chnossos May 3 at 11:32
1  
You involve the destructor twice for each node –  Dieter Lücking May 3 at 11:32
4  
this == nullptr isn't very useful. –  Mat May 3 at 11:32
    
Chnossos, Dieter Lücking you're right, I didn't know that delete calls the destructor; I thought it was only to clear the memory. Mat, what should I use? –  Bonnev May 3 at 11:36
1  
"what should I use" - to do what? By definition, this cannot be null. (This test can only succeed if your program has entered undefined-behaviour land from an earlier mistake, in which case all bets are off anyway) –  Matt McNabb May 3 at 12:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Multiple things :

  1. Don't call a destructor by yourself unless used with a placement new.

  2. By the C++ Standard, this can't be equal to nullptr. If it is, you have more serious problems.

  3. delete already calls the destructor automatically.

  4. delete can be passed a nullptr without problem.

Your destructor should look like :

~BSTree()
{
    delete left;
    delete right;
    // possibly ...
    left = right = nullptr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should also set this->right = nullptr; after deleteing. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 3 at 11:37
    
@Chnossos, can you plz explain why "this cannot be equal to nullptr"? –  Rakib May 3 at 11:52
    
The C++ Standard says that it does not make sense, although in rare case it could happen, but it is always an error. Check this. –  Chnossos May 3 at 11:56
    
"this" can be NULL / nullptr. Whether the standard says so or not is irrelevant. It can happen. Simply call a method on a NULL pointer. So long as the method doesn't read/write any data members or call any virtual functions you won't get a crash (crazy stuff!). MFC is even written to handle that case (some, not all classes). –  Stephen Kellett May 29 at 23:58

Below code should be adequate, delete null pointer is valid.

~BSTree()
{
  delete left;
  delete right;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should also set this->right = nullptr; after deleteing. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 3 at 11:37
5  
it's almost unnecessary as the object itself is being deleted, no any further reference would likely to happen. –  Rico Wang May 3 at 11:39

The code should be like this

   ~BSTree()
   {
     if ( this->left != nullptr){
          delete this->left;
          this->left= nullptr;
     }
     if(this->right != nullptr){
       delete this->right;
       this->right = nullptr;
     }
  }

delete operator does 2 things sequentially:

  1. Calls destructor
  2. De-allocates memory

you should not call destructor manually. And one common sense, the dest method is called on this object, so how this can be null (it is possible to call destructor on null object, but then it is a bug and the check this==nullptr will not help there).

share|improve this answer
    
You should also set this->right = nullptr; after deleteing. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 3 at 11:36
    
@πάνταῥεῖ, does not the delete operator do this? –  Rakib May 3 at 11:39
1  
@RakibulHasan No it doesn't. –  Chnossos May 3 at 11:39
    
@πάνταῥεῖ and Chnossos, thank you guys. I also learned something. –  Rakib May 3 at 11:44
1  
this->right no longer exists as soon as the object is destroyed, so the compiler could optimise out the line this->right = nullptr; anyway. I don't see why it "should also" be done –  Matt McNabb May 3 at 12:48

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