Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've received an assignment to program a dictionary using pointers and memory allocation in C. everything works fine, but the binary search that I've implemented behaves in a weird way (and I wasn't able to find a certain pattern that causes that behavior): sometimes after a user inputs a string in compare and it is than copied to search (after allocation) it just searches without finding but never gets out of the loop, here is the code: the array that the search uses is sorted and doesn't hold any duplicate values, each element of the array hold an address to a string, I would be grateful for any help.

void bin_search (char **word, char **definitions_1 ,char **definitions_2, int limit)
{
   int first, //start value for binary search
   last, //last value for binary search
   middle;  //middle value for binary search
   char compare [81], //will get the word to search
    *search, //will hold the string after memory allocation
    ESC [5] = "Exit"; //this string holds exit value for comparison
 do
  {
        first = 0;
    last = limit-1;
    middle = limit/2;
    compare [81];
    free(search); //memory allocated to search pointer is freed (allocation will take place upon next search)
    printf("Please enter a word (exit to terminate):\n");
    scanf("%s", compare); //gets desired word to search for
    search = (char*) malloc (strlen (compare)+1);
    if (search == NULL)
    {
        printf ("Memory allocation failed!\n");
        exit (1);
    }
    strlwr (compare+1); //each of the letters (excluding the first one) will be chaneged to lower case letters
    if ((int) *(compare) >= ASCII_a) //if the first [element] letter of a string [word] is a lower case letter
    {
        *compare = (char)(((int) *(compare)) - ASCII_CAPIAL_DIF); //the lower case letter will be changed to upper case one by subtracting the constat difference of 32
    }
    strcpy (search, compare);
        while (first <= last && strcmp (search, ESC) != 0)
    {
        printf("\nsearching\n");
        if (strcmp (word [middle], search) < 0)
        {
            first = middle+1;
        }
        else if (strcmp (word [middle], search) == 0)
        {
            if (definitions_2 [middle] == NULL) //if the word has only one definition, the second NULL one won't be diaplayed
            {
                printf("The word '%s' #%d has 1 definition:\n\n1.%s\n\n", search, middle, definitions_1 [middle]);

            }
            else //if the word has two defenitons - two of them will be disaplayed
            {
                printf("%s\n", definitions_2 [middle]);
                printf("The word '%s' #%d has 2 definitions:\n\n1.%s\n\n2.%s\n\n", search, middle, definitions_1 [middle], definitions_2 [middle]);
            }
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            last = middle-1;
            middle = ((first+last)/2);
        }
    }
    if (first > last && strcmp (compare, ESC) != 0)
    {
        printf("'%s' is an unknown word!\n", search);
    }
} while (strcmp (compare, ESC) != 0);
}
share|improve this question
    
Please show declarations of variables. For example, what is word? What is first? last? What are the values of the involved variables? – Joachim Pileborg May 3 '14 at 12:44
    
Word is a char ** variable - the array which contains all of the words after sorting an without duplicate values. first and last are variables needed for the binary search to operate. – Medvednic May 3 '14 at 12:54
    
Put a few print statements in your code (or debug it) to see how the variables change and where it differs from how you expect it to change. – Dukeling May 3 '14 at 12:55
    
Already did, the variables change as expected. – Medvednic May 3 '14 at 12:56
1  
Better extract the binary search into its own method. That should make everything look better. Also, avoid calling strcmp twice for the same arguments, even though some implementations will cache the result. – Deduplicator May 3 '14 at 13:07

Sometimes it helps to look at the structure of the code without all of the details

    if (strcmp (word [middle], search) < 0)
    {
        first = middle+1;
    }
    else if (strcmp (word [middle], search) == 0)
    {
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        last = middle-1;
        middle = ((first+last)/2);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Yep you are right... so is it (binary search) implemented correctly? – Medvednic May 3 '14 at 12:58
    
@Medvednic At first glance, it appears that your search is implemented correctly, once debugged of course :) – user3386109 May 3 '14 at 13:02
    
So what is the problem? I suspect that it has something to do with the user input. do I have to copy compare to another string search? – Medvednic May 3 '14 at 13:07
    
Copying compare to search is unnecessary, but harmless. The one problem I see there is that the first time through the loop you call free on an uninitialized pointer. You should initialize search to NULL, or just remove it altogether. – user3386109 May 3 '14 at 13:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.