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I just tried for my first programming interview and one of the questions was to write a program that given a 7 digit telephone number, could print all possible combinations of letters that each number could represent.

A second part of the question was like what about if this would have been a 12 digit international number? How would that effect your design.

I don't have the code that I wrote in the interview, but I got the impression he wasn't happy with it.
What is the best way to do this?

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1  
could you give a summary of what approach you took to the problem? –  GSto Feb 26 '10 at 20:16
    
did you do it recursively or iteratively? If your initial approach was not recursive, then it would likely be more difficult to generalize to an arbitrary number of digits (explaining the follow-up question). –  Tyler McHenry Feb 26 '10 at 20:21
    
@Tyler, Initially I did it iteratively but suggested I could do it recursively as well. –  Salaban Feb 26 '10 at 20:22
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21 Answers

The obvious solution is a function to map a digit to a list of keys, and then a function that would generate the possible combinations:

The first is obvious, the second is more problematic because you have around 3^number of digits combinations, which can be a very large number.

One way to do it is to look at each possibility for digit matching as a digit in a number (on base 4) and implement something close to a counter (jumping over some instances, since there are usually less than 4 letters mappable to a digit).

The more obvious solutions would be nested loops or recursion, which are both less elegant, but in my opinion valid.

Another thing for which care must be taken is to avoid scalability issues (e.g. keeping the possibilities in memory, etc.) since we are talking about a lot of combinations.

P.S. Another interesting extension of the question would be localization.

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Using Recursion seems the norm now with the OO Revolution. I like the map idea but this seems to be more for old C guys. –  Todd Moses Feb 26 '10 at 20:36
1  
I consider recursion a valid solution, but if someone would not offer something else in an interview - I would likely reject them (and I promise you - I am not alone): It is the norm, but in some environments (e.g. cellular phones) - too dangerous. –  Ofir Feb 26 '10 at 20:42
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namespace WordsFromPhoneNumber
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Summary description for WordsFromPhoneNumber
    /// </summary>
    [TestClass]
    public class WordsFromPhoneNumber
    {
        private static string[] Chars = { "0", "1", "ABC", "DEF", "GHI", "JKL", "MNO", "PQRS", "TUV", "WXYZ" };
        public WordsFromPhoneNumber()
        {
            //
            // TODO: Add constructor logic here
            //
        }

        #region overhead

        private TestContext testContextInstance;

        /// <summary>
        ///Gets or sets the test context which provides
        ///information about and functionality for the current test run.
        ///</summary>
        public TestContext TestContext
        {
            get
            {
                return testContextInstance;
            }
            set
            {
                testContextInstance = value;
            }
        }

        #region Additional test attributes
        //
        // You can use the following additional attributes as you write your tests:
        //
        // Use ClassInitialize to run code before running the first test in the class
        // [ClassInitialize()]
        // public static void MyClassInitialize(TestContext testContext) { }
        //
        // Use ClassCleanup to run code after all tests in a class have run
        // [ClassCleanup()]
        // public static void MyClassCleanup() { }
        //
        // Use TestInitialize to run code before running each test 
        // [TestInitialize()]
        // public void MyTestInitialize() { }
        //
        // Use TestCleanup to run code after each test has run
        // [TestCleanup()]
        // public void MyTestCleanup() { }
        //
        #endregion

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
            IList<string> words = Words(new int[] { 2 });
            Assert.IsNotNull(words, "null");
            Assert.IsTrue(words.Count == 3, "count");
            Assert.IsTrue(words[0] == "A", "a");
            Assert.IsTrue(words[1] == "B", "b");
            Assert.IsTrue(words[2] == "C", "c");
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod23()
        {
            IList<string> words = Words(new int[] { 2 , 3});
            Assert.IsNotNull(words, "null");
            Assert.AreEqual(words.Count , 9, "count");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[0] , "AD", "AD");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[1] , "AE", "AE");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[2] , "AF", "AF");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[3] , "BD", "BD");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[4] , "BE", "BE");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[5] , "BF", "BF");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[6] , "CD", "CD");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[7] , "CE", "CE");
            Assert.AreEqual(words[8] , "CF", "CF");
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestAll()
        {
            int[] number = new int [4];
            Generate(number, 0);
        }

        private void Generate(int[] number, int index)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x <= 9; x += 3)
            {
                number[index] = x;
                if (index == number.Length - 1)
                {
                    var w = Words(number);
                    Assert.IsNotNull(w);
                    foreach (var xx in number)
                    {
                        Console.Write(xx.ToString());
                    }
                    Console.WriteLine(" possible words:\n");
                    foreach (var ww in w)
                    {
                        Console.Write("{0} ", ww);
                    }
                    Console.WriteLine("\n\n\n");
                }
                else
                {
                    Generate(number, index + 1);
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion

        private IList<string> Words(int[] number)
        {
            List<string> words = new List<string>(100);
            Assert.IsNotNull(number, "null");
            Assert.IsTrue(number.Length > 0, "length");
            StringBuilder word = new StringBuilder(number.Length);
            AddWords(number, 0, word, words);

            return words;
        }

        private void AddWords(int[] number, int index, StringBuilder word, List<string> words)
        {
            Assert.IsTrue(index < number.Length, "index < length");
            Assert.IsTrue(number[index] >= 0, "number >= 0");
            Assert.IsTrue(number[index] <= 9, "number <= 9");

            foreach (var c in Chars[number[index]].ToCharArray())
            {
                word.Append(c);
                if (index < number.Length - 1)
                {
                    AddWords(number, index + 1, word, words);
                }
                else
                {
                    words.Add(word.ToString());
                }
                word.Length = word.Length - 1;
            }
        }
    }
}
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Use a list L where L[i] = the symbols that digit i can represent.

L[1] = @,.,! (for example) L[2] = a,b,c

Etc.

Then you can do something like this (pseudo-C):

void f(int k, int st[])
{
  if ( k > numberOfDigits )
  {
    print contents of st[];
    return;
  }

  for each character c in L[Digit At Position k]
  {
    st[k] = c;
    f(k + 1, st);
  }
}

Assuming each list contains 3 characters, we have 3^7 possibilities for 7 digits and 3^12 for 12, which isn't that many. If you need all combinations, I don't see a much better way. You can avoid recursion and whatnot, but you're not going to get something a lot faster than this no matter what.

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In Java using recursion:

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class Main {  
    // Number-to-letter mappings in order from zero to nine
    public static String mappings[][] = {
        {"0"}, {"1"}, {"A", "B", "C"}, {"D", "E", "F"}, {"G", "H", "I"},
        {"J", "K", "L"}, {"M", "N", "O"}, {"P", "Q", "R", "S"}, 
        {"T", "U", "V"}, {"W", "X", "Y", "Z"}
    };

    public static void generateCombosHelper(List<String> combos, 
            String prefix, String remaining) {
        // The current digit we are working with
        int digit = Integer.parseInt(remaining.substring(0, 1));

        if (remaining.length() == 1) {
            // We have reached the last digit in the phone number, so add 
            // all possible prefix-digit combinations to the list
            for (int i = 0; i < mappings[digit].length; i++) {
                combos.add(prefix + mappings[digit][i]);
            }
        } else {
            // Recursively call this method with each possible new 
            // prefix and the remaining part of the phone number.
            for (int i = 0; i < mappings[digit].length; i++) {
                generateCombosHelper(combos, prefix + mappings[digit][i], 
                        remaining.substring(1));
            }
        }
    }

    public static List<String> generateCombos(String phoneNumber) {
        // This will hold the final list of combinations
        List<String> combos = new LinkedList<String>();

        // Call the helper method with an empty prefix and the entire 
        // phone number as the remaining part.
        generateCombosHelper(combos, "", phoneNumber);

        return combos;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String phone = "3456789";
        List<String> combos = generateCombos(phone);

        for (String s : combos) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}
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Note: This sample works for arbitrary length phone numbers. At a certain length, it will run out of memory because it has to store each combination in a List. Change the List.add method call to a println or something else to avoid this problem. –  William Brendel Feb 26 '10 at 20:58
    
Can you please explain the complexity of the program? –  user1429322 Feb 8 at 21:29
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This version in C# is reasonably efficient, and it works for non-western digits (like "۱۲۳۴۵۶۷" for example).

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string phoneNumber = null;
    if (1 <= args.Length)
        phoneNumber = args[0];
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(phoneNumber))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No phone number supplied.");
        return;
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Alphabetic phone numbers for \"{0}\":", phoneNumber);
        foreach (string phoneNumberText in GetPhoneNumberCombos(phoneNumber))
            Console.Write("{0}\t", phoneNumberText);
    }
}

public static IEnumerable<string> GetPhoneNumberCombos(string phoneNumber)
{
    phoneNumber = RemoveNondigits(phoneNumber);
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(phoneNumber))
        return new List<string>();

    char[] combo = new char[phoneNumber.Length];
    return GetRemainingPhoneNumberCombos(phoneNumber, combo, 0);
}

private static string RemoveNondigits(string phoneNumber)
{
    if (phoneNumber == null)
        return null;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char nextChar in phoneNumber)
        if (char.IsDigit(nextChar))
            sb.Append(nextChar);
    return sb.ToString();
}

private static IEnumerable<string> GetRemainingPhoneNumberCombos(string phoneNumber, char[] combo, int nextDigitIndex)
{
    if (combo.Length - 1 == nextDigitIndex)
    {
        foreach (char nextLetter in phoneNumberAlphaMapping[(int)char.GetNumericValue(phoneNumber[nextDigitIndex])])
        {
            combo[nextDigitIndex] = nextLetter;
            yield return new string(combo);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        foreach (char nextLetter in phoneNumberAlphaMapping[(int)char.GetNumericValue(phoneNumber[nextDigitIndex])])
        {
            combo[nextDigitIndex] = nextLetter;
            foreach (string result in GetRemainingPhoneNumberCombos(phoneNumber, combo, nextDigitIndex + 1))
                yield return result;
        }
    }

}

private static char[][] phoneNumberAlphaMapping = new char[][]
{
    new char[] { '0' },
    new char[] { '1' },
    new char[] { 'a', 'b', 'c' },
    new char[] { 'd', 'e', 'f' },
    new char[] { 'g', 'h', 'i' },
    new char[] { 'j', 'k', 'l' },
    new char[] { 'm', 'n', 'o' },
    new char[] { 'p', 'q', 'r', 's' },
    new char[] { 't', 'u', 'v' },
    new char[] { 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z' }
};
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In Python, iterative:

digit_map = {
    '2': 'abc',
    '3': 'def',
    '4': 'ghi',
    '5': 'jkl',
    '6': 'mno',
    '7': 'pqrs',
    '8': 'tuv',
    '9': 'wxyz',
}

def word_numbers(input):
  input = str(input)
  ret = ['']
  for char in input:
    letters = digit_map.get(char, '')
    ret = [prefix+letter for prefix in ret for letter in letters]
  return ret

ret is a list of results so far; initially it is populated with one item, the empty string. Then, for each character in the input string, it looks up the list of letters that match it from the dict defined at the top. It then replaces the list ret with the every combination of existing prefix and possible letter.

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1  
Beautiful. It has the problem that it'll return [''] if the digit "1" is present, though. To solve that, use digit_map.get(char,char). As a bonus, this will leave hyphens in place, if there are any. –  redtuna Mar 1 '10 at 22:30
    
So, there are no word numbers that include 1, because there are no letters on 1. But, including digits makes sense - and could be more neatly handled by appendng the digit to the set of returned characters. –  Nick Johnson Mar 2 '10 at 0:49
    
I think you miss letters = digit_map.get(char, '') if letters == '': continue ret = [prefix + letter for prefix in ret for letter in letters] 2 lines in center. –  Love Sharma Apr 6 '12 at 18:15
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Oracle SQL: Usable with any phone number length and can easily support localization.

CREATE TABLE digit_character_map (digit number(1), character varchar2(1));

SELECT replace(permutations,' ','') AS permutations
FROM (SELECT sys_connect_by_path(map.CHARACTER,' ') AS permutations, LEVEL AS lvl
      FROM digit_character_map map 
      START WITH map.digit = substr('12345',1,1)
      CONNECT BY   digit = substr('12345',LEVEL,1))
WHERE lvl = length('12345');
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Here is one for pain C. This one is likley not efficet (in fact I don't think it is at all). But there are some intresting aspects to it.

  1. It take a number and converts it into a string
  2. It just raises the seed number once each time to create the next sequential string

Whats nice about this is that there is no real limit to the size of the string (no character limit) This allows you to generate longer and longer strings if need be just by waiting.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define CHARACTER_RANGE 95  //  The range of valid password characters
#define CHARACTER_OFFSET 32 //  The offset of the first valid character

void main(int argc, char *argv[], char *env[])
{
    int i;

    long int string;
    long int worker;
    char *guess;    //  Current Generation
    guess = (char*)malloc(1);   //  Allocate it so free doesn't fail

    int cur;

    for ( string = 0; ; string++ )
    {
        worker = string;

        free(guess);
        guess = (char*)malloc((string/CHARACTER_RANGE+1)*sizeof(char)); //  Alocate for the number of characters we will need

        for ( i = 0; worker > 0 && i < string/CHARACTER_RANGE + 1; i++ )    //  Work out the string
        {
            cur = worker % CHARACTER_RANGE; //  Take off the last digit
            worker = (worker - cur) / CHARACTER_RANGE;  //  Advance the digits
            cur += CHARACTER_OFFSET;

            guess[i] = cur;
        }
        guess[i+1] = '\0';  //  NULL terminate our string

        printf("%s\t%d\n", guess, string);
    }
}
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static final String[] keypad = {"", "", "ABC", "DEF", "GHI", "JKL", "MNO", "PQRS", "TUV", "WXYZ"};



String[] printAlphabet(int num){
        if (num >= 0 && num < 10){
            String[] retStr;
            if (num == 0 || num ==1){
                retStr = new String[]{""};
            } else {
                retStr = new String[keypad[num].length()];
                for (int i = 0 ; i < keypad[num].length(); i++){
                    retStr[i] = String.valueOf(keypad[num].charAt(i));
                }
            }
            return retStr;
        }

        String[] nxtStr = printAlphabet(num/10);

        int digit = num % 10;

        String[] curStr = null;
        if(digit == 0 || digit == 1){
            curStr = new String[]{""};
        } else {
            curStr = new String[keypad[digit].length()];
            for (int i = 0; i < keypad[digit].length(); i++){
                curStr[i] = String.valueOf(keypad[digit].charAt(i));
            }
        }

        String[] result = new String[curStr.length * nxtStr.length];
        int k=0;

        for (String cStr : curStr){
            for (String nStr : nxtStr){
                result[k++] = nStr + cStr;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
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/**
 * Simple Java implementation without any input/error checking 
 * (expects all digits as input)
 **/
public class PhoneSpeller
{

    private static final char[][] _letters = new char[][]{
            {'0'},
            {'1'},
            {'A', 'B', 'C'},
            {'D', 'E', 'F'},
            {'G', 'H', 'I'},
            {'J', 'K', 'L'},
            {'M', 'N', 'O'},
            {'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S'},
            {'T', 'U', 'V'},
            {'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z'}
    };

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        if (args.length != 1)
        {
            System.out.println("Please run again with your phone number (no dashes)");
            System.exit(0);
        }
        recursive_phoneSpell(args[0], 0, new ArrayList<String>());

    }


    private static void recursive_phoneSpell(String arg, int index, List<String> results)
    {
        if (index == arg.length())
        {
            printResults(results);
            return;
        }
        int num = Integer.parseInt(arg.charAt(index)+"");

        if (index==0)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j<_letters[num].length; j++)
            {
                results.add(_letters[num][j]+"");
            }
            recursive_phoneSpell(arg, index+1, results);
        }
        else
        {
            List<String> combos = new ArrayList<String>();
            for (int j = 0; j<_letters[num].length; j++)
            {
                 for (String result : results)
                 {
                     combos.add(result+_letters[num][j]);
                 }
            }
            recursive_phoneSpell(arg, index+1, combos);
        }
    }

    private static void printResults(List<String> results)
    {
        for (String result : results)
        {
            System.out.println(result);
        }
    }
}
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public class Permutation {

    //display all combination attached to a 3 digit number

    public static void main(String ar[]){

            char data[][]= new char[][]{{'a','k','u'},
                                {'b','l','v'},
                                {'c','m','w'},
                                {'d','n','x'},
                                {'e','o','y'},
                                {'f','p','z'},
                                {'g','q','0'},
                                {'h','r','0'},
                                {'i','s','0'},
                                {'j','t','0'}};


        int num1, num2, num3=0;
        char tempdata[][]= new char[3][3];
        StringBuilder number = new StringBuilder("324"); // a 3 digit number

        //copy data to a tempdata array-------------------
        num1= Integer.parseInt(number.substring(0,1));
        tempdata[0] = data[num1];
        num2= Integer.parseInt(number.substring(1,2));
        tempdata[1] = data[num2];
        num3= Integer.parseInt(number.substring(2,3));
        tempdata[2] = data[num3];

        //display all combinations--------------------
        char temp2[][]=tempdata;
        char tempd, tempd2;
        int i,i2, i3=0;
        for(i=0;i<3;i++){
                tempd = temp2[0][i];
             for (i2=0;i2<3;i2++){
                 tempd2 = temp2[1][i2];
                 for(i3=0;i3<3;i3++){
                     System.out.print(tempd);
                     System.out.print(tempd2);
                     System.out.print(temp2[2][i3]);
                     System.out.println();
                 }//for i3

            }//for i2
         }
    }

}//end of class
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I am rather a newbie so please correct me wherever I am wrong.

First thing is looking into space & time complexity. Which is really bad since it's factorial so for factorial(7) = 5040 any recursive algorithm would do. But for factorial(12) ~= 4 * 10^8 which can cause stack overflow in recursive solution.

So I would not attempt a recursive algorithm. Looping solution is very straight forward using "Next Permutation".

So I would create and array {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and generate all permutation and while printing replace them with respective characters eg. 0=A, 5=F

Next Perm algorithm works as follows. eg Given 1,3,5,4 next permutation is 1,4,3,5

Steps for finding next perm.

  1. From right to left, find first decreasing number. eg 3

  2. From left to right, find lowest number bigger than 3 eg. 4

  3. Swap these numbers as reverse the subset. 1,4,5,3 reverse subset 1,4,3,5

Using Next permutation ( or rotation) you generate specific subset of permutations, say you want to show 1000 permutations starting from a particular phone number. This can save you from having all numbers in memory. If I store numbers as 4 byte integers, 10^9 bytes = 1 GB !.

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Here is the working code for the same.. its a recursion on each step checking possibility of each combinations on occurrence of same digit in a series....I am not sure if there is any better solution then this from complexity point of view.....

Please let me know for any issues....

import java.util.ArrayList;


public class phonenumbers {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static String mappings[][] = {
        {"0"}, {"1"}, {"A", "B", "C"}, {"D", "E", "F"}, {"G", "H", "I"},
        {"J", "K", "L"}, {"M", "N", "O"}, {"P", "Q", "R", "S"}, 
        {"T", "U", "V"}, {"W", "X", "Y", "Z"}
    };

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        String phone = "3333456789";
        ArrayList<String> list= generateAllnums(phone,"",0);
    }

    private static ArrayList<String> generateAllnums(String phone,String sofar,int j) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        //System.out.println(phone);
        if(phone.isEmpty()){
            System.out.println(sofar);
            for(int k1=0;k1<sofar.length();k1++){
                int m=sofar.toLowerCase().charAt(k1)-48;
                if(m==-16)
                    continue;
                int i=k1;
                while(true && i<sofar.length()-2){
                    if(sofar.charAt(i+1)==' ')
                        break;
                    else if(sofar.charAt(i+1)==sofar.charAt(k1)){
                        i++;
                    }else{
                        break;
                    }

                }
                i=i-k1;
                //System.out.print(" " + m +", " + i + " ");
                System.out.print(mappings[m][i%3]);
                k1=k1+i;
            }
            System.out.println();

            return null;
        }
        int num= phone.charAt(j);
        int k=0;
        for(int i=j+1;i<phone.length();i++){
            if(phone.charAt(i)==num){
                k++;
            }
        }

        if(k!=0){

            int p=0;
            ArrayList<String> list2= generateAllnums(phone.substring(p+1), sofar+phone.charAt(p)+ " ", 0);
            ArrayList<String> list3= generateAllnums(phone.substring(p+1), sofar+phone.charAt(p), 0);

        }
        else{
            ArrayList<String> list1= generateAllnums(phone.substring(1), sofar+phone.charAt(0), 0);
        }
        return null;

    }

}
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In C++(recursive):

string pattern[] = {"0",".,!","ABC","DEF","GHI","JKL","MNO","PQRS","TUV","WXYZ"};
ofstream keyout("keypad.txt");
void print_keypad(char* str, int k, vector<char> patt, int i){
if(str[k] != '\0')
{
    int x = str[k] - '0';
    for(int l = 0; l < pattern[x].length(); l++)
    {
        patt[i] = pattern[x][l];
        print_keypad(str, k+1, patt, i+1);
    }
    keyout << endl;
}
else if(i == k)
{
    string st(patt.data());
    keyout << st << endl;
    return;
}
}

This function can be called with 'k' and 'i' equal to zero.

Anyone, who requires more illustration to understand the logic, can combine recursion technique with following output:

ADG
ADH
ADI

AEG
AEH
AEI

AFG
AFH
AFI


BDG
BDH
BDI

BEG
BEH
BEI

BFG
BFH
...
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You find source (Scala) here and an working applet here.

Since 0 and 1 aren't matched to characters, they build natural breakpoints in numbers. But they don't occur in every number (except 0 at the beginning). Longer numbers like +49567892345 from 9 digits starting, can lead to OutOfMemoryErrors. So it would be better to split a number into groups like

  • 01723 5864
  • 0172 35864

to see, if you can make sense from the shorter parts. I wrote such a program, and tested some numbers from my friends, but found rarely combinations of shorter words, which could be checked in a dictionary for matching, not to mention single, long words.

So my decision was to only support searching, no full automation, by displaying possible combinations, encouraging splitting the number by hand, maybe multiple time.

So I found +-RAD JUNG (+-bycicle boy).

If you accept misspellings, abbreviations, foreign words, numbers as words, numbers in words, and names, your chance to find a solution is much better, than without fiddling around.

246848 => 2hot4u (too hot for you) 
466368 => goodn8 (good night) 
1325   => 1FCK   (Football club)
53517  => JDK17  (Java Developer Kit)

are things a human might observe - to make an algorithm find such things is rather hard.

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#include <sstream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

map< int, string> keyMap;

void MakeCombinations( string first, string joinThis , vector<string>& eachResult )
{
    if( !first.size() )
        return;

    int length = joinThis.length();
    vector<string> result;

    while( length )
    {
        string each;
        char firstCharacter = first.at(0);
        each =  firstCharacter;
        each += joinThis[length -1];
        length--;

        result.push_back(each);     
    }

    first = first.substr(1);

    vector<string>::iterator begin = result.begin();    
    vector<string>::iterator end = result.end();
    while( begin != end)
    {
        eachResult.push_back( *begin);
        begin++;
    }

    return MakeCombinations( first, joinThis, eachResult);
}


void ProduceCombinations( int inNumber, vector<string>& result)
{
    vector<string> inputUnits;

    int number = inNumber;
    while( number )
    {
        int lastdigit ;

        lastdigit = number % 10;
        number = number/10;
        inputUnits.push_back( keyMap[lastdigit]);
    }

    if( inputUnits.size() == 2)
    {
        MakeCombinations(inputUnits[0], inputUnits[1], result);
    }
    else if ( inputUnits.size() > 2 )
    {
        MakeCombinations( inputUnits[0] , inputUnits[1], result);

        vector<string>::iterator begin = inputUnits.begin();    
        vector<string>::iterator end = inputUnits.end();

        begin += 2;
        while(  begin != end )
        {
            vector<string> intermediate = result;
            vector<string>::iterator ibegin = intermediate.begin(); 
            vector<string>::iterator iend = intermediate.end(); 

            while( ibegin != iend)
            {
                MakeCombinations( *ibegin , *begin, result);
                //resultbegin =  
                ibegin++; 
            }
            begin++;            
        }
    }
    else
    {

    }

    return;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    keyMap[1] = "";
    keyMap[2] = "abc";
    keyMap[3] = "def";
    keyMap[4] = "ghi";
    keyMap[5] = "jkl";
    keyMap[6] = "mno";
    keyMap[7] = "pqrs";
    keyMap[8] = "tuv";
    keyMap[9] = "wxyz";
    keyMap[0] = "";

    string  inputStr;
    getline(cin, inputStr);

    int number = 0;

    int length = inputStr.length();

    int tens = 1;
    while( length )
    {
        number += tens*(inputStr[length -1] - '0');
        length--;
        tens *= 10;
    }

    vector<string> r;
    ProduceCombinations(number, r);

    cout << "[" ;

    vector<string>::iterator begin = r.begin(); 
    vector<string>::iterator end = r.end();

    while ( begin != end)
    {
        cout << *begin << "," ;
        begin++;
    }

    cout << "]" ;

    return 0;
}
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It is similar to a question called letter combinations of a phone number, here is my solution.
It works for an arbitraty number of digits, so long as the result doesn't exceed the memory limit.

import java.util.HashMap;
public class Solution {
    public ArrayList<String> letterCombinations(String digits) {
        ArrayList<String> res = new ArrayList<String>();
        ArrayList<String> preres = new ArrayList<String>();
        res.add("");

        for(int i=0;i<digits.length();i++){
            for(String str: res)
                String letters = map.get(digits.charAt(i));
                for(int j=0;j<letters.length();j++)
                    preres.add(str+letters.charAt(j));

            res = preres;
            preres = new ArrayList<String>();
        }      
        return res;
    }

    static final HashMap<Character,String> map = new HashMap<Character,String>(){{
        put('2',"abc");
        put('3',"def");
        put('4',"ghi");
        put('5',"jkl");
        put('6',"mno");
        put('7',"pqrs");
        put('8',"tuv");
        put('9',"wxyz");
    }} ;
}

I'm not sure how 12-digit international numbers affect the design.

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This is a recursive algorithm in C++11.

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <list>

std::array<std::string, 10> pm = {
    "0", "1", "ABC", "DEF", "GHI", "JKL", "MNO", "PQRS", "TUV", "WXYZ"
};

void generate_mnemonic(const std::string& numbers, size_t i, std::string& m,
    std::list<std::string>& mnemonics)
{
    // Base case
    if (numbers.size() == i) {
        mnemonics.push_back(m);
        return;
    }

    for (char c : pm[numbers[i] - '0']) {
        m[i] = c;
        generate_mnemonic(numbers, i + 1, m, mnemonics);
    }
}

std::list<std::string> phone_number_mnemonics(const std::string& numbers)
{
    std::list<std::string> mnemonics;
    std::string m(numbers.size(), 0);
    generate_mnemonic(numbers, 0, m, mnemonics);
    return mnemonics;
}

int main() {
    std::list<std::string> result = phone_number_mnemonics("2276696");
    for (const std::string& s : result) {
        std::cout << s << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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In numeric keyboards, texts and numbers are placed on the same key. For example 2 has “ABC” if we wanted to write anything starting with ‘A’ we need to type key 2 once. If we wanted to type ‘B’, press key 2 twice and thrice for typing ‘C’. below is picture of such keypad.

keypad

Given a keypad as shown in diagram, and a n digit number, list all words which are possible by pressing these numbers.

For example if input number is 234, possible words which can be formed are (Alphabetical order): adg adh adi aeg aeh aei afg afh afi bdg bdh bdi beg beh bei bfg bfh bfi cdg cdh cdi ceg ceh cei cfg cfh cfi

Let’s do some calculations first. How many words are possible with seven digits with each digit representing n letters? For first digit we have at most four choices, and for each choice for first letter, we have at most four choices for second digit and so on. So it’s simple maths it will be O(4^n). Since keys 0 and 1 don’t have any corresponding alphabet and many characters have 3 characters, 4^n would be the upper bound of number of words and not the minimum words.

Now let’s do some examples.

For number above 234. Do you see any pattern? Yes, we notice that the last character always either G,H or I and whenever it resets its value from I to G, the digit at the left of it gets changed. Similarly whenever the second last alphabet resets its value, the third last alphabet gets changes and so on. First character resets only once when we have generated all words. This can be looked from other end also. That is to say whenever character at position i changes, character at position i+1 goes through all possible characters and it creates ripple effect till we reach at end. Since 0 and 1 don’t have any characters associated with them. we should break as there will no iteration for these digits.

Let’s take the second approach as it will be easy to implement it using recursion. We go till the end and come back one by one. Perfect condition for recursion. let’s search for base case. When we reach at the last character, we print the word with all possible characters for last digit and return. Simple base case.When we reach at the last character, we print the word with all possible characters for last digit and return. Simple base case.

Following is C implementation of recursive approach to print all possible word corresponding to a n digit input number. Note that input number is represented as an array to simplify the code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

// hashTable[i] stores all characters that correspond to digit i in phone
const char hashTable[10][5] = {"", "", "abc", "def", "ghi", "jkl",
                           "mno", "pqrs", "tuv", "wxyz"};

// A recursive function to print all possible words that can be obtained
// by input number[] of size n.  The output words are one by one stored
// in output[]
void  printWordsUtil(int number[], int curr_digit, char output[], int n)
{
    // Base case, if current output word is prepared
int i;
if (curr_digit == n)
{
    printf("%s ", output);
    return ;
}

// Try all 3 possible characters for current digir in number[]
// and recur for remaining digits
for (i=0; i<strlen(hashTable[number[curr_digit]]); i++)
{
    output[curr_digit] = hashTable[number[curr_digit]][i];
    printWordsUtil(number, curr_digit+1, output, n);
    if (number[curr_digit] == 0 || number[curr_digit] == 1)
        return;
}
}

// A wrapper over printWordsUtil().  It creates an output array and
// calls printWordsUtil()
void printWords(int number[], int n)
{
char result[n+1];
result[n] ='\0';
printWordsUtil(number, 0, result, n);
}

//Driver program
int main(void)
{
int number[] = {2, 3, 4};
int n = sizeof(number)/sizeof(number[0]);
printWords(number, n);
return 0;
}

Output:

adg adh adi aeg aeh aei afg afh afi bdg bdh bdi beg beh bei bfg bfh bfi cdg cdh cdi ceg ceh cei cfg cfh cfi

Time Complexity:

Time complexity of above code is O(4^n) where n is number of digits in input number.

References:

http://www.flipkart.com/programming-interviews-exposed-secrets-landing-your-next-job-3rd/p/itmdxghumef3sdjn?pid=9788126539116&affid=sandeepgfg

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I rewrote the latest answer to this (referred above) , from C to Java. I also included the support for 0 and 1 (as 0 and 1) because numbers such as 555-5055 weren't working at all with the above code.

Here it is. Some comments are preserved.

public static void printPhoneWords(int[] number) {
    char[] output = new char[number.length];
    printWordsUtil(number,0,output);
}

static String[] phoneKeys= new String[]{"0", "1", "ABC", "DEF", "GHI", "JKL",
               "MNO", "PQRS", "TUV", "WXYZ"};
private static void printWordsUtil(int[] number, int curDigIndex, char[] output) {
    // Base case, if current output word is done
    if (curDigIndex == output.length) {
        System.out.print(String.valueOf(output) + " "); 
        return;
    }

      // Try all 3-4 possible characters for the current digit in number[]
      // and recurse for the remaining digits

    char curPhoneKey[] = phoneKeys[number[curDigIndex]].toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i< curPhoneKey.length ; i++) {
        output[curDigIndex] = curPhoneKey[i];
        printWordsUtil(number, curDigIndex+1, output);
        if (number[curDigIndex] <= 1) // for 0 or 1
            return;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int number[] = {2, 3, 4};
    printPhoneWords(number);
    System.out.println();
}
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protected by Bo Persson Oct 19 '12 at 21:15

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