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I have written the below code to fit a Gaussian curve to a histogram. It seems to work, although the Y scaling is different. What am I doing wrong?

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

list = [0,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4]

plt.figure(1)
plt.hist(list)
plt.xlim((min(list), max(list)))

mean = np.mean(list)
variance = np.var(list)
sigma = np.sqrt(variance)
x = np.linspace(min(list), max(list),100)
plt.plot(x,mlab.normpdf(x,mean,sigma))

plt.show()

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to normalize the histogram, since the distribution you plot is also normalized:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

list = np.random.randn(100)

plt.figure(1)
plt.hist(list, normed=True)
plt.xlim((min(list), max(list)))

mean = np.mean(list)
variance = np.var(list)
sigma = np.sqrt(variance)
x = np.linspace(min(list), max(list),100)
plt.plot(x,mlab.normpdf(x,mean,sigma))

plt.show()

Note the normed=True in the call to plt.hist. Note also that I changed your sample data, because the histogram looks weird with too few data points.

If you instead want to keep the original histogram and rather adjust the distribution, you have to scale the distribution such that the integral over the distribution equals the integral of the histogram, i.e. the number of items in the list multiplied by the width of the bars. This can be achieved like

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

list = np.random.randn(1000)

plt.figure(1)
result = plt.hist(list)
plt.xlim((min(list), max(list)))

mean = np.mean(list)
variance = np.var(list)
sigma = np.sqrt(variance)
x = np.linspace(min(list), max(list),100)
dx = result[1][1] - result[1][0]
scale = len(list)*dx
plt.plot(x, mlab.normpdf(x,mean,sigma)*scale)

plt.show()

Note the scale factor calculated from the number of items times the width of a single bar.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, it works well. Is there a way that rather than normalizing the histogram to the distribution, I could just not normalize the distribution in the first place? I'm very much a beginner at Python, let alone MatPlotLib. –  El Confuso May 3 at 17:59
    
You can of course multiply the distribution by the total number of items divided by the number of bins in the histogram. That should get you what you want. –  David Zwicker May 3 at 19:34
    
Can I trouble you for an example please? –  El Confuso May 3 at 20:25
    
See the second example in my answer. –  David Zwicker May 4 at 8:41

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