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The code below is based on Merge sort from "Programming Scala" causes stack overflow

  def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean)(xs: List[T]): List[T] = {

    def merge(xs: List[T], ys: List[T], acc: List[T]): List[T] =
      (xs, ys) match {
        case (Nil, _) => ys.reverse ::: acc
        case (_, Nil) => xs.reverse ::: acc
        case (x :: xs1, y :: ys1) =>
          if (less(x, y)) merge(xs1, ys, x :: acc)
          else merge(xs, ys1, y :: acc)
      }
    val n = xs.length / 2
    if (n == 0) xs
    else {
      val (ys, zs) = xs splitAt n
      merge(msort(less)(ys), msort(less)(zs), Nil).reverse
    }

  }

When I try to invoke msort using :

  val l = List(5, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3)
  msort[Int](l)

I receive error :

Multiple markers at this line - type mismatch; found : List[Int] required: (Int, Int) => Boolean - type mismatch; 
 found : List[Int] required: (Int, Int) => Boolean - missing arguments for method msort in object mergesort; follow 
 this method with `_' if you want to treat it as a partially applied function

How do I invoke msort & why is a function required as part of the invocation ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In Scala it is possible to have Multiple Parameters Lists. Your invocation only passes one argument.

The method is declared as def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean)(xs: List[T]): List[T], so the first argument is of type (T, T) => Boolean, which is a function taking two parameters of type T and returning a Boolean value. You pass there a List[Int], which makes Scala complain.

Why would you like to have such a thing you may ask. Well, consider following example.

val stringSorter = msort[String]((a, b) => a.compareTo(b) < 0) _
// stringSorter: List[String] => List[String] = <function1>

val integerSorter = msort[Int]((a, b) => a < b) _
// integerSorter: List[Int] => List[Int] = <function1>

Those two invocation create two new functions taking only a single parameter - the list you want to sort. You don't have to tell it how to compare the elements, because you already did. Note you can invoke the same function with different lists as an argument.

integerSorter(List(2, 3, 1))
// res0: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

integerSorter(List(2, 4, 1))
// res1: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 4)

stringSorter(List("b", "a", "c"))
res3: List[String] = List(a, b, c)

Note also that the newly created functions are type safe and following code will fail:

integerSorter(List("b", "a", "c"))
<console>:10: error: type mismatch;
 found   : String("b")
 required: Int
              integerSorter(List("b", "a", "c"))

Implicit Parameters

As the article in the link mentioned one of the reasons you may want to use Multiple Parameter Lists are implicit parameters.

When using implicit parameters, and you use the implicit keyword, it applies to the entire parameter list. Thus, if you want only some parameters to be implicit, you must use multiple parameter lists.

Let's modify the example code you gave us a bit to introduce a new type:

trait Comparator[T] {
  def less(a: T, b: T): Boolean
}

and let's swap the parameter lists, and add implicit keyword to the second one, so now it becomes:

def msort[T](xs: List[T])(implicit c: Comparator[T]): List[T] = {

    def merge(xs: List[T], ys: List[T], acc: List[T]): List[T] =
      (xs, ys) match {
        case (Nil, _) => ys.reverse ::: acc
        case (_, Nil) => xs.reverse ::: acc
        case (x :: xs1, y :: ys1) =>
          if (c.less(x, y)) merge(xs1, ys, x :: acc)
          else merge(xs, ys1, y :: acc)
      }
    val n = xs.length / 2
    if (n == 0) xs
    else {
      val (ys, zs) = xs splitAt n
      merge(msort(ys)(c), msort(zs)(c), Nil).reverse
    }

}

Now you can declare implicit object which will be used in case you don't supply one, e.g.

implicit val intComparator = new Comparator[Int] { def less(a: Int, b: Int) = a < b }

msort(List(5, 3, 1, 3))
// res8: List[Int] = List(1, 3, 3, 5)

While this may not seem to be very appealing it gives you extra flexibility when designing your API. Let's assume that we have a type called CustomType. It can declare an implicit in the companion object and it will be resolved "automatically" by the compiler.

case class CustomType(ordinal: Int, name: String)

object CustomType {
  implicit val customTypeComparator = new Comparator[CustomType] { 
    def less(a: CustomType, b: CustomType) = a.ordinal < b.ordinal 
  }
}


msort(List(CustomType(2, "Second"), CustomType(1, "First")))
// res11: List[CustomType] = List(CustomType(1,First), CustomType(2,Second))
share|improve this answer
def msort[T](less: (T, T) => Boolean)(xs: List[T]): List[T]

This function takes two arguments: a function less and a list xs.

How do I invoke msort?

You have to provide values for both arguments: msort(...)(...).

Why is a function required as part of the invocation?

Because the argument less is declared with function type (T, T) => Boolean.

share|improve this answer
    
You could also curry it of course. –  Boris the Spider May 3 '14 at 22:28

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