Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In order to come up with an answer to one of my questions here, I wrote below CUDA program hoping to see the results of covering the latency effect in the output.

#include <stdio.h>

static void HandleError( cudaError_t err, const char *file, int line ) {
    if (err != cudaSuccess) {
        printf( "%s in %s at line %d\n", cudaGetErrorString( err ), file, line );
        exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
    }
}
#define HANDLE_ERROR( err ) (HandleError( err, __FILE__, __LINE__ ))

__global__ void write_kernel( uint* destination, const long long nELem, int* clock_cycles ) {

#define THREAD_FOR_CLOCK 0
#define BLOCK_FOR_CLOCK 0
    clock_t start_time, stop_time;
    start_time = clock();
    uint tid = (blockIdx.x * blockDim.x) + threadIdx.x;
    for( long long i = tid; i < nELem; i += blockDim.x*gridDim.x ) {
        destination[i] = tid;
    }
    stop_time = clock();
    if( threadIdx.x == THREAD_FOR_CLOCK && blockIdx.x == BLOCK_FOR_CLOCK )
        *clock_cycles = (int)(stop_time - start_time);

}

int main(void)
{
    const int POWER_OF_TWO_MIN = 28;
    const int POWER_OF_TWO_MAX = 29;

    unsigned int *host_dst, *dev_dst, *peer_dev_dst;
    const long long n = 1 << POWER_OF_TWO_MAX;
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaHostAlloc( (void**)&host_dst, n * sizeof(unsigned int), cudaHostAllocDefault ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaSetDevice( 1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&peer_dev_dst, n * sizeof(unsigned int) ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaSetDevice( 0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceEnablePeerAccess( 1, 0 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_dst, n * sizeof(unsigned int) ) );

//#define SELECT_SECOND_DEVICE 1
#ifdef SELECT_SECOND_DEVICE
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaSetDevice( 1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceEnablePeerAccess( 0, 0 ) );
#endif

    cudaEvent_t start, stop;
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventCreate(&start) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventCreate(&stop) );
    float dt_ms;

    int* clock_cycles;
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaHostAlloc( (void**)&clock_cycles, sizeof(int), cudaHostAllocDefault ) );
    for( int i = POWER_OF_TWO_MIN; i <= POWER_OF_TWO_MAX; ++i ) {

        long long nElem = 1 << i;
        fprintf( stdout, "Total bytes to write = %lld\n", nElem * sizeof(unsigned int) );

        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(start) );
        write_kernel<<<8*12,256>>>(dev_dst, nElem, clock_cycles);   // For GTX780.
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaPeekAtLastError() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(stop) );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceSynchronize() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop) );
        fprintf( stdout, "Destination: device 0. Total time taken: %f with %d clock_cycles.\n", dt_ms, *clock_cycles);

        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(start) );
        write_kernel<<<8*12,256>>>(host_dst, nElem, clock_cycles);  // For GTX780.
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaPeekAtLastError() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(stop) );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceSynchronize() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop) );
        fprintf( stdout, "Destination: host. Total time taken: %f with %d clock_cycles.\n", dt_ms, *clock_cycles);

        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(start) );
        write_kernel<<<8*12,256>>>(peer_dev_dst, nElem, clock_cycles);  // For GTX780.
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaPeekAtLastError() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventRecord(stop) );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceSynchronize() );
        HANDLE_ERROR( cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop) );
        fprintf( stdout, "Destination: device 1. Total time taken: %f with %d clock_cycles.\n", dt_ms, *clock_cycles);

    }

    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceReset() );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaSetDevice( 1 ) );
    HANDLE_ERROR( cudaDeviceReset() );
    printf("Program finished without error.\n");
    return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

I compiled this program for CC=3.5 and executed it on a machine with two GeForce GTX 780 cards, having CUDA 6.0 on Ubuntu 12.04. UVA is in effect.

The result I get is the following:

Total bytes to write = 1073741824
Destination: device 0. Total time taken: 4.568160 with 3925931 clock_cycles.
Destination: host. Total time taken: 160.545990 with 140478478 clock_cycles.
Destination: device 1. Total time taken: 470.532959 with 465316058 clock_cycles.
Total bytes to write = 2147483648
Destination: device 0. Total time taken: 9.019136 with 9048172 clock_cycles.
Destination: host. Total time taken: 320.048859 with 321699558 clock_cycles.
Destination: device 1. Total time taken: 941.183533 with 945883905 clock_cycles.
Program finished without error.

I had been thinking that no matter where the destination resides, when writing to a global/host/peer-device memory address, SM schedules the next instruction because there's no need to stop the execution for the write to be completed. So I was expecting that although it will take longer to apply writes to host/peer-device, clock cycles they take should be about the same. But above results surprised me because they show that SM actually waits for the instructions to be completed. It also seems to contrast what Nicholas Wilt mentions in his book the CUDA Handbook:

Mapped pinned memory works especially well when writing to host memory (for example, to deliver the result of a reduction to the host) because unlike reads, there is no need to wait until writes arrive before continuing execution (Hardware designers call this "covering the latency").

I'm probably missing a point here. But I'm not sure what that is.
My guess is that limited cache size enforces the upcoming writes to wait until previous ones have applied. I get below results when the number of elements to write are smaller:

Total bytes to write = 262144
Destination: device 0. Total time taken: 0.011328 with 546 clock_cycles.
Destination: host. Total time taken: 0.048416 with 575 clock_cycles.
Destination: device 1. Total time taken: 0.117568 with 546 clock_cycles.
Total bytes to write = 524288
Destination: device 0. Total time taken: 0.011680 with 1335 clock_cycles.
Destination: host. Total time taken: 0.087776 with 7110 clock_cycles.
Destination: device 1. Total time taken: 0.229984 with 14088 clock_cycles.

The clock cycles start to rapidly get higher for host/peer-device memory writes from 524288 bytes. But considering 1.5 MB L2 cache size for the device, it seems like this increase shouldn't happen here for this size. Maybe I'm missing a point here too.

share|improve this question
2  
You're writing a gigabyte or 2 of data. I don't think the caches have anything to do with a long burst write. Once you fill up internal queues for any given resource (e.g. LSU) subsequent requests will stall. If you want to cover latency after doing a host write, do something else (i.e. compute) besides another host write. –  Robert Crovella May 4 '14 at 0:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.