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I have two separate files and I was hoping to search and replace a string in file1 for an entire line of multiple strings in file2. I have been working on using awk but I am not sure how to replace a string for a line of strings. Below is an example of what I was looking to do.

The string to be replaced would match the first field of the line to replace it (multiple strings to insert in place of the single string). It's a "find and replace" task.

file1:

001 111 112 113 116 117
002 221 222
003 331
004
005 551 555

file2:

113 114 115
222 223 224 225 226 227
551 552 553 554

Desired output:

001 111 112 113 114 115 116 117
002 221 222 223 224 225 226 227
003 331
004
005 551 552 553 554 555
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2 Answers 2

Try this:

awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$0;next}{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)$i=($i in a?a[$i]:$i)}1' file2 file1
001 111 112 113 114 115 116 117
002 221 222 223 224 225 226 227
003 331
004
005 551 552 553 554 555
  • We read file2 first and create an array indexed at column1 containing entire line as value.
  • For file1 we loop through each element if it is found in our array we substitute it with the value.
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Here you go:

awk '
  FILENAME == "file2" {
    key = $1
    map[key] = $0
    next
  }
  { 
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
      if (map[$i])
        $i = map[$i]
    }
    print
  }
' file2 file1
001 111 112 113 114 115 116 117
002 221 222 223 224 225 226 227
003 331
004
005 551 552 553 554 555

This takes lines from file2 and populates an array called map with the whole line, keyed on the first element (I'm treating awk's associative array system more like a hash). Otherwise, loop through each element and substitute those that have map values, then print the output. Note that this must be run with file2 provided first so that the map array can be populated.

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1  
awk has a next statement that works somewhat like an else so you can say condition{foo; next} {bar} instead of having to redundantly specify the negation of the first condition condition{foo} !condition{bar}. –  Ed Morton May 4 at 1:20
    
@EdMorton: true, I didn't know about next. I also like @JS's use of NR==FNR, though I wanted the code to be legible to an awk newbie. @JS's ternary operator (and the assignment atop it), as well as the use of a 1 condition (which implicitly prints), is hard to read and therefore not terribly instructive, though the overall logic is the same as mine. –  Adam Katz May 4 at 2:23
2  
The ternary operator and 1 are idiomatic awk and highly instructive. That 1 alone teaches users about the condition/action syntax and default action of awk - if you know that already, it's obvious, and if you don't know it then you need to learn it so it's a great, simple teaching point. –  Ed Morton May 4 at 2:34
3  
I find it interesting that you would reject the ternary operator in production code, which is not even an awk-only construct, but have no problem hard-coding a filename. +1 nonetheless. –  Adrian Frühwirth May 4 at 7:38
1  
@AdrianFrühwirth: fair point. I chose to hard-code the filename because it was instructive (see my first comment). Awk doesn't do a good job at this sort of thing, so for production code, I'd use either another language or wrap it in a shell script. Still, it's good to drive people towards legible code. Let them figure out how to make it dense and self-serving elsewhere. –  Adam Katz May 4 at 23:21

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