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I have a derived class named TimeWithDate inherited from Date class and Time class. I try to use the member function by using ::.

like this:

int subtract(TimeWithDate& other_date){
    return Date::subtract(other_date) + Time::subtract(other_date);
}

but I got this warning: Error: a nonstatic member reference must be relative to a specific object.

Then I tried this way:

    int subtract(TimeWithDate& other_date){
    return *(Date*)this.subtract(other_date) + *(Time*)this.subtract(other_date);
}

and got this warning: Error: 'this' may only be used inside a nonstatic member function.

What should I do?

whole code

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class Time
{
    int hour, second, minute;
public:
    Time();
    Time(int h, int m, int s);
    void set(int h, int m, int s);
    void increment();
    void display();
    bool equal(Time &other_time);
    bool less_than(Time &other_time);
    int subtract(Time &another);
};

class Date
{
    int year, month, day;
public:
    Date();
    Date(int y, int m, int d);
    void increment();
    bool equal(Date &another);
    int subtract(Time &another);
};
class TimeWithDate : public Time, public Date
{
public:
    bool compare(TimeWithDate&);
    void increment();
    int subtract(TimeWithDate&);
};

bool TimeWithDate::compare(TimeWithDate &other_date){
    if (Date::equal(other_date) && Time::equal(other_date))

        return true;
    else return false;
}

void TimeWithDate::increment(){
    Time::increment();
    Time zero(0, 0, 0);
    if (Time::equal(zero))
        Date::increment();
}
int subtract(TimeWithDate& other_date){
    return Date::subtract(other_date) + Time::subtract(other_date);
}
share|improve this question
    
*(Date*) is a bad idea, design your class so that casting like this is not necessary. –  Matt McNabb May 4 at 5:26

2 Answers 2

subtract() should be a member function of class TimeWithDate. It appears that you have it as a non-member/ static function. So, this pointer is no more available in that function.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, this is a pointer, so this. should be this-> –  Matt McNabb May 4 at 5:23

You need parse your whole code, below works fine in my computer(VS2012).

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base1
{
public:
    void print(const char *str){ cout << "base1 " << str << endl; }
};

class Base2
{
public:
    void print(const char *str){ cout << "base2 " << str << endl; }
};

class Derived : public Base1, public Base2
{
public:
    void print(const char *str);
};

void Derived::print(const char *str)
{
    cout << "Derived " << str << endl;
    Base1::print(str);
    Base2::print(str);
}

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    d.print("hello");

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Doesn't work on ideone unfortuately :-( ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 4 at 4:11
    
@πάνταῥεῖ yes it does. In your link you use a winapi idiom: TCHAR. Try this –  CoffeeandCode May 4 at 5:08
    
whole code uploaded already. –  Gnostikoi May 4 at 5:44
    
miss TimeWithDate::subtract, you need "TimeWithDate::"; –  tim May 4 at 6:04
    
Oh I see. Thanks a lot! –  Gnostikoi May 4 at 6:45

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