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I have a simple Winform MVVM setup that updates the developer information and the view will pop up a dialog with the new developer information after being notified of the update. The objects are instantiated using Castle Windsor container from XML configuration. Everything works fine until I changed the MVVM component to transient. I have provided some code below. Hope they are sufficient:

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    IDeveloper developer = IoC.Container.Resolve<IDeveloper>();
    IMVVM viewModel = IoC.Container.Resolve<IMVVM>(new Arguments(new
      { MyDeveloper = developer }));
    View view = IoC.Container.Resolve<View>(new Arguments(new
      { MyViewModel = viewModel }));
    viewModel.ChangeDeveloperInfo("Mike Wise");
  }
}

public class MVVM : IMVVM, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private IDeveloper developer;
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public MVVM(IDeveloper MyDeveloper)
    {
        developer = MyDeveloper;
    }

    protected void RaiseDeveloperInfoChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }

    public void ChangeDeveloperInfo(string strNewName)
    {
        developer.Name = strNewName;
        RaiseDeveloperInfoChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Name"));
    }

    public string GetName()
    {
        return developer.Name;
    }

    public string GetProgramName()
    {
        return developer.ProgramName;
    }

    public string GetWebsite()
    {
        return developer.Website;
    }

    public string GetComments()
    {
        return developer.Comments;
    }
}

public abstract class View
{
    protected IMVVM ViewModel;

    public View(IMVVM MyViewModel)
    {
        this.ViewModel = MyViewModel;
        this.ViewModel.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(DeveloperInfoChanged_Handler);
    }

    protected virtual void DeveloperInfoChanged_Handler(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        UpdateDisplay();
    }

    protected abstract void UpdateDisplay();
}

public class WinFormView : View
{
    private NAboutDialog about;

    public WinFormView(IMVVM viewModel) : base(viewModel)
    {
        this.about = new NAboutDialog();
    }

    protected override void UpdateDisplay()
    {
        about.DeveloperName = this.ViewModel.GetName();
        about.ProgramName = this.ViewModel.GetProgramName();
        about.Website = this.ViewModel.GetWebsite();
        about.Comments = this.ViewModel.GetComments();
        about.ShowDialog();
    }
}

<component id="developerC"
  service="Gtk.WindsorNini.IDeveloper, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  type="Gtk.WindsorNini.DeveloperC, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  lifestyle="transient">
</component>

<component id="mvvm"
  service="Gtk.WindsorNini.IMVVM, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  type="Gtk.WindsorNini.MVVM, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  lifestyle="transient">
</component>

<component id="gtk_view"
  service="Gtk.WindsorNini.View, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  type="Gtk.WindsorNini.GtkView, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  lifestyle="transient">
</component>
<component id="winform_view"
  service="Gtk.WindsorNini.View, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  type="Gtk.WindsorNini.WinFormView, Gtk.WindsorNini"
  lifestyle="transient">
</component>

Forgive me for the long code. The problem is really the MVVM being transient. Appreciate any help here

share|improve this question
    
Does it work if you set it as singleton? –  TamerM May 4 at 8:59
    
Yes, but I want to be able to call it each time with a new instance –  Tim Robbins May 4 at 9:15
    
What is the error you get? –  TamerM May 4 at 9:19
    
There are no errors. Outputs to Debug writer indicates that MVVM PropertyChanged event is not raised in transient mode. –  Tim Robbins May 4 at 9:26
    
I think it has something to do with your dependencies, some model depend on others in you case. stackoverflow.com/questions/3776975/… –  TamerM May 4 at 9:44

3 Answers 3

After some more fiddling around I figured out the problem is really with Windsor injecting all the dependencies for you. You cannot pass your own object as a constructor parameter if that object is registered and managed by the Windsor.

In my case, I wanted to have my own references to the viewmodel as well as the view. However, when you create the view, Windsor will create a new instance of the viewmodel and not use the one you supplied it with.

I wasn't able to debug this because the dependencies are injected by Windsor and not referenced in my code so I couldn't "watch" what's going on with them.

What I did after reading Marwijn's comment was to have the viewmodel output to the debug writer in its constructor so I can see which IDeveloper was created by it each time it is called.

The main code works like this: 1) Create the model IDeveloper 2) Create the viewmodel with the above IDeveloper as the constructor argument 3) Create the view with the above viewmodel as the constructor argument

This was what I got:

Developer to pass as argument: Gtk.WindsorNini.DeveloperB

MVVM created using developer Gtk.WindsorNini.DeveloperB

MVVM created using developer Gtk.WindsorNini.DeveloperA

Notice that the viewmodel MVVM's constructor is called twice - First with the DeveloperB I supplied - Second with the DeveloperA injected by Windsor (Default)

I cannot afford the time and energy to dig into Windsor's source code to see what's going on under the hood but my guess is that the first constructor call was discarded because Windsor recognized that the argument IDeveloper should be injected by it and thus it made the second call.

share|improve this answer

It appears that you are trying to link 2 views together by registering directly to the event on one another. This creates a tight coupling between the 2 views and leads to such unwanted scenarios as the one you experienced just now.

May I propose that you look into the event aggregator pattern which seems to be missing from your framework. This will allow you to build your view models loosely coupled and not having to worry to have direct references between them. Being myself a user of the caliburn.micro framework, you might find some useful info on what it is here: Caliburn Micro Event Aggregator

Your problem does not stem from using castle or DI/IoC but rather from finding a proper mechanism to synchronize your viewmodels (views).

As an aside, if you did do your homework beforehand, you would have known that the whole reason to use castle or any other containers of that type was to alleviate object creation and management by letting the container resolve the objects and inject the missing objects by itself. This is by design and not a "problem". If you wanted to manually handle such responsibilities, then using DI/IoC containers to manage that particular object would not suit your logic.

I personally have no problem using transient view models resolved by castle and piping any events to be handled by other viewmodels through a singleton of my event aggregator when required, all without having to know my targets directly from each viewmodel.

I hope that this might be helpful for your application design.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I just learned that fact from my homework ;P Appreciate your suggestion and will look into it –  Tim Robbins May 8 at 12:20

The more I play around with Windsor, the more shortcomings I discover. This simple exercise merely serves as a proof of concept (POC) as to whether I should incorporate Windsor into my own framework. It looks like I have to drop it.

The reason why component lifecycle defaults to singleton is because it works in all cases I have tested. When you change this to transient, instances created that try to establish references to one another will fail.

For example, my first post didn't work because the view instance subscribed to the viewmodel event:

public View(IMVVM MyViewModel)
{
  this.ViewModel = MyViewModel;
  //The code below will fail to register the handler but it won't raise any errors
  this.ViewModel.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(DeveloperInfoChanged_Handler);
}

protected virtual void DeveloperInfoChanged_Handler(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
  //This will not be triggered by an update in the viewmodel
  UpdateDisplay();
}

Now if I add a Visit(this) in the view constructor, it also fails to add this view reference to the viewmodel. You will get a runtime error that says object instance not set:

public View(IMVVM MyViewModel)
{
  this.ViewModel = MyViewModel;
  //Below makes viewmodel reference this view instance
  this.ViewModel.Visit(this);
  this.ViewModel.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(DeveloperInfoChanged_Handler);
}

//Viewmodel updates the view when model data changes
public void ChangeDeveloperInfo(string strNewName)
{
  developer.Name = strNewName;
  view.UpdateDisplay();
}

Conclusion is, Windsor works great with singletons but with transient lifestyles, it cannot wire up the slightest complication in instance relationships ;(

share|improve this answer
1  
Hello Tim, I think your conclusion is premature. Using Windsor it is possible to wire up complex dependencies. In the code above the View takes a VM as dependency, hence when you instantiate a view, a new ViewModel is created (you told it to be transient, not singleton). In a well written application you should only make a single call to container.Resolve. I downvoted you for (wrongly) answering your own question and judging about a great library that you apparently not yet understand. First learn the concept of dependency injection than you will value an Ioc container. –  Marwijn May 5 at 6:50

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