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I need something like this:

void launch_task()
{
    std::thread([](){ run_async_task(); });
}

Except thread's destructor will terminate my task. I don't need any control over the task, don't need a return value either. It just has to run its course and then the thread should terminate and C++ thread object should be disposed of. What C++ 11 facility do I need?

I've looked at std::async, but couldn't find an example of usage for my case. It seems to be a pretty complicated system, and I'd need to somehow store and manipulate std::future or it'd become synchronous (if my understanding is correct; I didn't find a good clear article on std::async).

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So what do you expect to happen if the thread you throw off is in the middle of something, then main finishes? –  Yakk May 4 at 16:47
    
@Yakk: Don't care. It should be terminated along with whatever it was doing, which is perfectly fine in my application. –  Violet Giraffe May 4 at 17:04
    
So, you are ok with it formatting your hard drive because main exited first? Seems unwise to me! I prefer to avoid nasal demons myself. Undefined behavior is better avoided than ignored... The C++ standard is vague about what happens to detached threads at the end of main, to an extent I personally am not comfortable with. If you are targeting a single platform, you can have more confidence. –  Yakk May 4 at 17:12
    
@Yakk: you're demonizing UB beyond the point of common sense. –  Violet Giraffe May 4 at 17:25
    
Suppose the thread has aquired a remote resource on a server or on hardware on this system, that it will release via RAII. Your 'I do not care' will probably in practice leak that. If unlucky, the standard mandates no guarantees about what happens: if you are programming for one architecture and know the code will not be used for any other purpose (throw away code), you could detemine how they actually handle it, and get at worst the above result. *(*char)0=7 is also a way to terminate that is usually safe. –  Yakk May 4 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Just detach it immediately after creation.

std::thread([](){ run_async_task(); }).detach();

Once detached, the thread will no longer be joinable, so ~thread() will have no effect. This answer discusses more details of this behavior.

As mentioned by W.B. below, std::async will not work for the following reason, pulled from this reference.

If the std::future obtained from std::async has temporary object lifetime (not moved or bound to a variable), the destructor of the std::future will block at the end of the full expression until the asynchronous operation completes

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7  
Lambda is redundant here. std::thread(run_async_task).detach(); –  W.B. May 4 at 10:04
1  
@W.B.: indeed. Lambda is there because I need it for my actual code (I;m launching a void function with some parameters, and capture these parameters from the arguments of my launch_task function). –  Violet Giraffe May 4 at 10:12
4  
@JanickBernet with std::async you can't just launch and forget about it, because once the std::future return value goes out of scope it will block until the async function returns. –  W.B. May 4 at 10:17
2  
@JanickBernet Unfortunately std::async is not quite "async". It is actually blocking call. –  texasbruce May 4 at 10:25
2  
@JanickBernet, have a look here. If the std::future obtained from std::async has temporary object lifetime (not moved or bound to a variable), the destructor of the std::future will block at the end of the full expression until the asynchronous operation completes –  W.B. May 4 at 10:25

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