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Lets say I have a variadic higher order function

template<typename F, typename ...Args>
void execution(F func, Args&&... args)
{
    func(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

Then for this overload set

void f() {}
void f(int arg) {}

Overload resolution will be impossible

int main()
{
    execution(f, 1);
    execution(f);
    return 0;
}

Yet if only either one of the two is provided, the program compiles

  1. Why does this happen ? Why template argument deduction fails?
  2. If I remove f() from the set and replace it with f(arg, arg2) there's still a problem. Is there a workaround, or do I always have to provide the type of the function as a template argument ?

    execution<void()>(f);
    
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1  
Is there a C++ Jon Skeet? –  zmbq May 4 '14 at 10:22
1  
That's firstly a problem of template argument deduction, less of overload resolution. –  jrok May 4 '14 at 10:25
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/9054703/… <- looks similar –  Mat May 4 '14 at 10:30
    
The C++1y solution is to write execution([](auto&&... pp){ return f(std::forward<decltype(pp)>(pp)...); });. This is a known problem, and I guess this question has multiple duplicates. –  dyp May 4 '14 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need an overload set object. This is an object that represents the entire overload set of functions of f:

struct f_overload_set {
  template<typename...As>
  auto operator()(As&&...as)->
    decltype(f(std::declval<As>()...))
  { return f(std::forward<As>(as)...); }
};

now pass f_overload_set{} to your template function.

templates function value arguments must be values, and in current C++ there is no first class value that represents an entire overload set of a function. The symbol f gets disambiguated into one overload at each point of use: but that requires an immediate context at the point of use. The above defers the disambiguation until we have the arguments handy.

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That solves it . And I thought I had figured out creating overload sets explicitly –  Nikos Athanasiou May 4 '14 at 18:57
1  
C++14: #define LIFT(f) [](auto&&... a) -> decltype(auto){ return f(std::forward<decltype(a)>(a)...); }. Replace std::forward with static_cast if you want no dependency on <utility>. –  Xeo May 4 '14 at 19:15

When doing template type deduction, the compiler doesn't analyse how the types are used inside the function. Therefore when deducing the template parameters, the compiler sees no relation between the different template arguments. Thus the additional variadic template arguments don't matter at all, and the problem can be reduced to

template<typename Func> void execution(Func func);

void f();
void f(int);

execution(f);

With this minimized code, it should be obvious why template argument deduction fails.

You can resolve this by making your first argument explicitly dependent on the remaining template arguments, e.g.:

template<typename... Args>
 void execution(void (*func)(Args ...), Args ... args)
{
  func(std::forward<Args>(args) ...);
}
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std::function is not required to SFINAE-reject functions that cannot be called for the argument types supplied in the template parameter. This is a QoI issue. –  dyp May 4 '14 at 13:30
    
Additionally, your solution requires an explicit conversion of f to a std::function type at the call site: Overload resolution between different functions only happens when an explicit target type is given (e.g. void execution( void(*)(int) );). The std::function types only have constructor templates, therefore no overload resolution will take place and f will be ambiguous. –  dyp May 4 '14 at 13:35
    
@dyp: Thank you, I was not aware of the problems with std::function. I've changed the code to a simple function pointer; while less flexible, it should resolve the issue at hand. –  celtschk May 4 '14 at 18:13
    
void foo(int); template<typename Args ...> void execution(void (*func)(Args ...), Args ... args); int main(){ execution( foo, 3.0 ); } does what? Ie, this fix is insufficient. –  Yakk May 4 '14 at 18:35
    
@Yakk: It gives an error because there's no f(double). Which I'd consider expected behaviour. Which behaviour did you expect? –  celtschk May 4 '14 at 18:47

There is no specific function 'f' available:

Simplifying it:

template<typename F>
void execution(F func)
{}

void f() {}
void f(int arg) {}

int main()
{
    execution(f);
    return 0;
}

You have two functions 'f' available for template parameter deduction/substitution

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