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Since C# 4.0, Tuple classes are available. Why is a Tuple with three elements not a subclass of a Tuple with two elements?

This can be useful when defining an operation First : Tuple<T1,T2> -> T1 which will work for any tuple, regardless of the number of additional items.

Furthermore since the elements of a tuple are read-only, why is a Tuple<T1,T2> not covariant? (For example, a ITuple<Foo,Bar> being a ITuple<SuperFoo,SuperBar> as well)

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+1 Those are good questions. –  poke May 4 '14 at 15:51
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With regards to variance: it only applies to interfaces. In fact you could create a covariant ITuple<T> –  miniBill May 4 '14 at 16:07
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Not using interfaces has the advantage of avoiding a vcall –  miniBill May 4 '14 at 16:09
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From a logical and theory perspective it should inherit. From a practical perspective, it is not usually useful and would confuse many C# programmers. –  user2684301 May 4 '14 at 16:42
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From a modeling perspective, a group of three things is not a kind of group of two things. –  Ian McLaird May 4 '14 at 16:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because it would be very bad design with unnecessarily deep inheritance for high lengths. The only reasonable inheritance is from some GeneralTuple, but I cannot come up with any code that could be shared and used by all n-tuples. Neiter could the .NET designers.

The recursive definition of an n-tuple as an (n-1)-tuple plus one element is unnatural and therefore unwieldy, because in a real tuple all the elements are equal. Imagine you have {1, 2, 3}. There are two ways of representing it according to your proposal: {{1, 2}, 3} and {1, {2, 3}}, neither of which can reasonably be preferred, which proves the representation wrong, because it requires artificial & superfluous conventions in addition to the beautiful and non-reduntant mathematical definition.

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Indeed the order is somehow arbitrary. It would however enable the programmer to take care of the order since this adds additional functionality. For instance in Haskell a tuple is ordered first by the first element. In that sense the first item of a tuple has more impact than the second etc. Furthermore I don't see why deep nesting is a bad design. By using sealed, on the getters, code can be optimized such that it doesn't iterate over the hierarchy. –  CommuSoft May 4 '14 at 16:52
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@CommuSoft: "Indeed the order is somehow arbitrary. It would however enable the programmer to take care of the order since this adds additional functionality." In my opinion, this case contradicts the very purpose of tuples and calls for a different and more suitable data structure. "For instance in Haskell a tuple is ordered first by the first element. In that sense the first item of a tuple has more impact than the second etc." The programmer is free to define sorting rules as it likes him, yet I don't think they should be built into the defintion of the tuple. –  Ant_222 May 4 '14 at 17:04
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@CommuSoft if you need to rely on how Tuple inheritance is designed, you're doing something wrong. –  Crono May 4 '14 at 17:17
    
@CommuSoft: "Furthermore I don't see why deep nesting is a bad design." Deep nesting isn't bad in itself, but only in this very context, because here it is unnecessary, as recursion is unnecessary in the calculation of the factorial, where a simple loop is just enough. It makes tuples poorly scalable because huge tuples would require deep inheritance. "By using sealed, on the getters, code can be optimized such that it doesn't iterate over the hierarchy." How would you access the first element in the left-associated 8-tuple without accessing the 2-tuple containing it? –  Ant_222 May 4 '14 at 17:19
    
@Ant_222: Because the compiler stores the method pointers, and since the method of Tuple2 is sealed, this will be a hard link to that method. Thus the method vector will straightly point to the correct method. This in contrast with 8 different classes of tuples where each getter is implemented separately resulting in a larger code base and thus a higher probability of program cache faults. –  CommuSoft May 4 '14 at 17:23

TL;DR Because C# language is not MATLAB language, is not Wolfram language, is not Prolog language is not F# language. The language design and class library design aim to provide production-ready, powerful, easy to work with, efficient, Turing-complete universal language (see e.g. Wikipedia: C# Design Goals). C# is not a language for expressing and manipulating ideas in their original phylosophical or mathematical sense

Why Tuple with 3 elements is not a subclass of Tuple with 2 elements?

Why someone at Microsoft decided to write the http://referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/tuple.cs the way it is? Ask the designers at Microsoft.

This "why" question does not have a real life meaning (and does not fit the Stack Overflow question format). If you'd ask "how" can I live with it in my code and e.g. how can I define GeneralTuple that would allow me to create some abstract generic function library... then such question would have a sense and would have a usable answer.

From my perspective this design decision was probably lead by the nature and history of tuples. As far as I remember it comes from the Linda computation model where tuples where the basic data structure present in the Associated memory known as Tuplespace. Tuples were merely simple data structures (no OOP objects with methods and behavior), similar to what is today known as Data Transfer Object (DTO). It always was just a simple data structure, part of the associative memory. Required was simple and fast read/write/transfer. That is what the built-in C# Tuples support also today

Why is a Tuple<T1,T2> not covariant (i.e. a Tuple<Foo,Bar> is a Tuple<SuperFoo,SuperBar> as well)?

Because it is not how Generic classes work. This question was explained several times also on Stack Overflow, see e.g. Generic inherited type restriction in C#

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Actually, C# defined the in and out keyword exactly to support covaraince for generic types: blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2010/02/16/… –  CommuSoft May 19 '14 at 4:41
    
@CommuSoft actually as you can read in the above link pointing to the Microsoft's source code at referencesource.microsoft.com there are no in and out keywords used so old restrictions on inheritance between generic classes still hold. Perhaps you should slightly improve your question –  xmojmr May 19 '14 at 5:41
    
@CommuSoft by improvement I mean clarification of "what is your expected outcome of the answers for your own code?" (for theoretical questions there are other StackExchange sites like Programmers or Computer Science) –  xmojmr May 19 '14 at 5:50

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