Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Once again, I play with MinGW inline assembly.

#include <stdio.h>

int foobar(int);

int main(){
 int n = 0;
 printf("Number: ");
 scanf("%d", &n);
 printf("\n%d",foobar(n));
 return 0;
}

int foobar(int num){
 int result = 0;
 asm(".intel_syntax noprefix\n");
 asm("mov eax, num\n");
 asm("add eax, 110b\n");
 asm("sub eax, 2\n");
    asm("mov result, eax\n");
 return result;
}

Compile it:

C:\Users\Andre\Codes>gcc asmtest.c -o asmtest -masm=intel

Ouch, there are errors:

C:\Users\Andre\AppData\Local\Temp\ccqny4yb.s: Assembler messages: C:\Users\Andre\AppData\Local\Temp\ccqny4yb.s:53: Error: backward ref to unknown label "110:"

What's wrong here? I think my code is valid already?

share|improve this question
    
If it's unknown, how does it know that it's backward? –  bmargulies Feb 28 '10 at 17:05
add comment

1 Answer

GCC works best with AT&T style assembly, and GAS doesn't implement all of Intel syntax. Your immediate problem comes from 110b not being interpreted as a number, but that's not all.

You can't reference variables directly in GCC's inline assembler syntax. You'll have to write it like this (using the default -masm=att):

int foobar(int num) {
    int result;
    asm("mov %1, %%eax\n\t"
        "add $6, %%eax\n\t"
        "sub $2, %%eax\n\t"
        "mov %%eax, %0"
        : "=g" (result)
        : "g" (num)
        : "eax", "cc");
    return result;
}

After the first colon is a comma-separated list of output operands. Because "=g" (result) is the first constraint, result gets alias %0. "=g" indicates to GCC that %0 can be any general-purpose register or memory and will only be written to. (+ instead of = would indicate read-write. GCC may decide to re-use the same register for multiple purposes, so you must be explicit in telling it exactly how everything will be used.)

After the second colon is a comma-separated list of input operands. Because "g" (num) is the second constraint, num gets alias %1. "g" means it will only be read from.

After the third colon is a comma-separated list of clobbers. This tells GCC that the inline-assembly may change these registers/memory even though they're not input nor output, so that GCC must reload any information it was keeping in them across the inline assembly. Here, we obviously change %eax, and the condition code (flags) register is also affected by add/sub.

Look at the assembly the compiler generates:

$ cc -S -o- -m32 asmtest.c | sed -n /globl.foobar/,/-foobar/p
.globl foobar
        .type   foobar, @function
foobar:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $16, %esp
#APP
# 15 "asmtest.c" 1
        mov 8(%ebp), %eax
        add $6, %eax
        sub $2, %eax
        mov %eax, -4(%ebp)
# 0 "" 2
#NO_APP
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   foobar, .-foobar

The compiler has decided to use the stack locations of num and result directly. If we used :"=r":"r" constraints (which means only registers are permitted) instead of :"=g":"g" (which permits registers or memory locations), the compiler would copy them to/from registers before/after the inline assembly.

$ cc -S -o- -m32 asmtest.c | sed -n /globl.foobar/,/-foobar/p
.globl foobar
        .type   foobar, @function
foobar:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $16, %esp
        movl    8(%ebp), %edx
#APP
# 15 "asmtest.c" 1
        mov %edx, %eax
        add $6, %eax
        sub $2, %eax
        mov %eax, %edx
# 0 "" 2
#NO_APP
        movl    %edx, -4(%ebp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   foobar, .-foobar

If you really want to use Intel syntax, put it in a separate .s source file, assemble it independently with NASM, then link the objects together.

$ cat asmtest.c
#include <stdio.h>

int foobar(int);
/* int foobar(int) __attribute__((fastcall)); */

int main() {
    int n = 0;
    printf("Number: ");
    scanf("%d", &n);
    printf("%d\n", foobar(n));
    return 0;
}
$ cat foobar.s
global foobar
foobar:
        mov eax,[esp+4]  # take this line out if C prototype is marked fastcall
        sub eax,110b
        add eax,2
        ret
$ nasm -f elf foobar.s
$ cc -m32 asmtest.c foobar.o
$ ./a.out
Number: 30
26

(Although -f elf isn't correct for Windows. Maybe -f win32? And due to Windows' stupidity, you may have to use the name _foobar in assembly.)

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. That works. Now I wonder, how GCC know that %0 is an alias for result, and %1 is an alias for num. I still don't get it. BTW, what do these 3 lines mean? : "=g" (result) : "g" (num) : "eax"); –  anta40 Feb 27 '10 at 15:54
    
@anta40 More details added. But really you should read the whole gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Extended-Asm.html section of the GCC manual. –  ephemient Feb 27 '10 at 17:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.