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I had an assignment to place the letter of the alphabet in 5 panels with the layout that I coded below. When you select a button it changes the JLabel to read the button that was clicked. The first way I did it, I wrote everything out by adding each button separately to each panel and adding all the ActionListeners and text. It was about 200 line but worked fine. I thought it would be more concise to put the JButtons into arrays and add the listeners and text at this point. I was able to get the JFrame to layout, but I have no idea how to use the ActionListener. Do I have to add a MouseListener to find out what panel was clicked and then determine the button was pressed?

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Container;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.*;

public class JFileCabinet1 extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    String[] lettersPanel1 = { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F" };
    String[] lettersPanel2 = { "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L" };
    String[] lettersPanel3 = { "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R" };
    String[] lettersPanel4 = { "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X" };
    String[] lettersPanel5 = { "Y", "Z" };

    private JPanel jp1 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 6));
    private JPanel jp2 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 6));
    private JPanel jp3 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 6));
    private JPanel jp4 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 6));
    private JPanel jp5 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 6));

    private JButton jblank1 = new JButton();
    private JButton jblank2 = new JButton();
    private JButton jblank3 = new JButton();
    private JLabel jl = new JLabel("");

    private Container con = getContentPane();
    private GridLayout layout = new GridLayout(5, 1, 5, 5);

    public JFileCabinet1() {

        super("File cabinet");

        con.add(jp1);
        for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel1.length; i++) {
            JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel1.length];
            button[i] = new JButton(lettersPanel1[i]);
            jp1.add(button[i]);
            button[i].addActionListener(this);
        }

        con.add(jp2);
        for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel2.length; i++) {
            JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel2.length];
            button[i] = new JButton(lettersPanel2[i]);
            jp2.add(button[i]);
            button[i].addActionListener(this);
        }

        con.add(jp3);
        for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel2.length; i++) {
            JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel3.length];
            button[i] = new JButton(lettersPanel3[i]);
            jp3.add(button[i]);
            button[i].addActionListener(this);
        }
        con.add(jp4);
        for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel4.length; i++) {
            JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel4.length];
            button[i] = new JButton(lettersPanel4[i]);
            jp4.add(button[i]);
            button[i].addActionListener(this);
        }

        con.add(jp5);
        for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel5.length; i++) {
            JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel5.length];
            button[i] = new JButton(lettersPanel2[i]);
            jp5.add(button[i]);
            button[i].addActionListener(this);
        }

        jp5.add(jblank1).setVisible(false);
        jp5.add(jblank2).setVisible(false);
        jp5.add(jblank3).setVisible(false);

        setSize(500, 500);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setVisible(true);
        setLayout(layout);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        JButton src = (JButton) e.getSource();

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JFileCabinet1 frame = new JFileCabinet1();
        frame.setVisible(true);

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
your actionPerformed does not do anything expect finding a specific button that is clicked – Kick Buttowski May 5 '14 at 0:53
    
I know, the ActionPreformed is not finished. The question I have is when the button is pressed does the information of which array and the location of the jbutton get communicated? I will need to change the the jlabel to match the button letter designation. – user3137110 May 5 '14 at 0:54
    
when I use getSource, I keep getting null. Nevertheless, when I use getActionCommand, I can write any JButton when it is clicked. I feel your approach is wrong, but I do not know how to explain so I will wait for other to explain so I can learn too. – Kick Buttowski May 5 '14 at 1:07

Do I have to add a mouse listener to find out what panel was clicked and then determine the button was pressed?

No, don't use mouse listeners on buttons. Your ActionListener implementation is fine and getSource will give you the button which was pressed.

To set the label to the text of the button, use jl.setText(src.getText()) inside actionPerformed.

If you want the panel which the button is in, use getParent() of the button.

share|improve this answer
    
@user3137110 If any of the answers solved your problem please consider accepting one. – user1803551 May 6 '14 at 2:23

The reality is, you don't actually need the arrays, directly any way, for the ActionListener, once actionPerformed is fired, you can get the JButton from the ActionEvents source property and extract the text from the button...

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    JButton src = (JButton) e.getSource();
    System.out.println(src.getText());
}

Now, if you want the button to carry more information (or different information then what is displayed) you can use the buttons actionCommand property.

Also, this...

for (int i = 0; i < lettersPanel2.length; i++) {
    JButton button[] = new JButton[lettersPanel2.length];

Doesn't make sense. Every time the loop runs, it is creating a new JButton array and it's only creating a local button array within the context of the for-loop

If you look at your for-loops, they are generally doing the same thing, the only difference is the source content (the character arrays) and where you're adding the buttons. You write a method to do this, for example...

public void addButtonsTo(String[]  letters, JPanel panel)  {
    for (int i = 0; i < letters.length; i++) {
        JButton button = new JButton(letters[i]);
        panel.add(button);
        button.addActionListener(this);
    }
}

And simply call it like...

addButtonsTo(lettersPanel1, jp1);
addButtonsTo(lettersPanel2, jp2);
addButtonsTo(lettersPanel3, jp3);
addButtonsTo(lettersPanel4, jp4);
addButtonsTo(lettersPanel5, jp5);

Have a read through How to Use Buttons, Check Boxes, and Radio Buttons and How to Write an Action Listener for more details...

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