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I've created an object that acts somewhat like infinity for long ints. Specifically:

#ifndef MU_INF_H
#define MU_INF_H
#include "mu.h"
namespace mu {
  class Inf {
  public:
    bool operator> ( long int i ) { return true; }
    bool operator> ( Inf i ) { return false; }
    ... lots of other boolean operators ...
    Inf& operator+ ( long int i ) { return *this; }
    Inf& operator+ ( Inf i ) { return *this; }
    ... lots of other integer operators ...
  };   // class Inf
}      // namespace mu
#endif

And this all works pretty well, allowing me to run unit tests of the form:

  mu::Inf inf;
  long int n = -1;
  long int z = 0;
  long int p = 1;

  ASSERT((inf + inf) == inf);
  ASSERT((inf + n) == inf);
  ASSERT((inf + z) == inf);
  ASSERT((inf + p) == inf);

  ASSERT((inf > inf) == false);
  ASSERT((inf > n) == true);
  ASSERT((inf > z) == true);
  ASSERT((inf > p) == true);

At the risk of making it impossible to assign a checkmark, I have three questions:

  • Does C++ already provide something like this, and/or is there an obvious better way than what I'm doing here?
  • I want to make an instance of Inf available throughout my system. I can't declare it a static const because it's not a "simple" object. What's the right approach: global? singleton pattern?
  • Is there a way to handle symmetric operators where the long int comes first, i.e. ASSERT((1 + inf) == inf)? (I won't be too sad if there isn't.)
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what do you mean it's not a "simple" object? –  Bryan Chen May 5 at 5:18
1  
You might get better help on codereview.stackexchange if your code works and you'd like advice on making it better. –  Approaching Darkness Fish May 5 at 5:19
    
@BryanChen: I mean that I cannot do static const Inf kInfinity = new Inf() or anything similar to make it a static constant. –  fearless_fool May 5 at 5:21
    
To make symmetric operators they should be free functions: Inf operator+(Inf a, inf b) { return a += b;} . Your existing operator+ does not follow the usual semantics of operator+ and could be confusing to work with (it does what operator+= normally does). –  Matt McNabb May 5 at 5:22
2  
@fearless_fool static const Inf kInfinity; –  Matt McNabb May 5 at 5:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

static const Inf kInfinity; works and will use the default constructor.

operator+ should be a free function that returns by value:

Inf operator+(Inf a, Inf b) { return a += b; }

You indicated that you would prefer to return a reference to kInfinity instead of a value. This is possible (although it seems a bit unwieldy to me); a const reference would have to be returned of course, since kInfinity is const.

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1  
Note: initialization of a static const requires a user-provided default constructor. The system default will not cut it. I only mention it because the class posted by the OP does not have one. (and +1 btw). –  WhozCraig May 5 at 5:43
  1. Not that I'm aware of, although it seems to me that you are using references to Inf and actual objects in a messy manner in your overloads.

    Normally, you take arguments by value or const reference and return by value for all operators besides the compound assignment ones (where you return by reference) to obtain the expected semantic. Of course, since your Inf object has no state, this all makes sense only to a certain extent.

  2. I'd use a const global to avoid the parentheses and the potential function call involved in a singleton. Whether this is also static should make almost no difference (you aren't accessing this in any way).

  3. You have to write your operator as a free function:

    inline Inf operator+(long int i, const Inf&) { return *this;} 
    
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+1. And note the OP could cover a lot more bases than just long if a SFINAE -driven set of free functions were used. Nice answer. –  WhozCraig May 5 at 5:45

Everyone was really helpful in guiding me to the True Way. To help others who came looking for answers, rather than making you stitch the answer together from the whole thread, I thought I'd post what I ended up with. Comments suggesting refinements are welcome, of course.

#ifndef MU_INDEFINITE_H
#define MU_INDEFINITE_H

namespace mu {

  class Indefinite {
  public:

    static const Indefinite kIndefinite;

    Indefinite() {}
    ~Indefinite() {}

  };

  inline Indefinite operator+ (long int i, Indefinite t) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator+ (Indefinite t, long int i) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator+ (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }

  inline Indefinite operator- (long int i, Indefinite t) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator- (Indefinite t, long int i ) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator- (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }

  inline Indefinite operator* (long int i, Indefinite t) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator* (Indefinite t, long int i ) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator* (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }

  // It's not clear what i / Indefinite should produce.  Forbid it for now.
  // inline long int operator/ (long int i, Indefinite t) { return 0; }
  inline Indefinite operator/ (Indefinite t, long int i ) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }
  inline Indefinite operator/ (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return Indefinite::kIndefinite; }

  inline bool operator> (long int i, Indefinite t) { return false; }
  inline bool operator> (Indefinite t, long int i) { return true; }
  inline bool operator> (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return false; }

  inline bool operator>= (long int i, Indefinite t) { return false; }
  inline bool operator>= (Indefinite t, long int i) { return true; }
  inline bool operator>= (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return true; }

  inline bool operator< (long int i, Indefinite t) { return true; }
  inline bool operator< (Indefinite t, long int i) { return false; }
  inline bool operator< (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return false; }

  inline bool operator<= (long int i, Indefinite t) { return true; }
  inline bool operator<= (Indefinite t, long int i) { return false; }
  inline bool operator<= (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return true; }

  inline bool operator== (long int i, Indefinite t) { return false; }
  inline bool operator== (Indefinite t, long int i) { return false; }
  inline bool operator== (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return true; }

  inline bool operator!= (long int i, Indefinite t) { return true; }
  inline bool operator!= (Indefinite t, long int i) { return true; }
  inline bool operator!= (Indefinite t1, Indefinite t2) { return false; }

}

#endif
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