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What regex can I use to match any valid IP-address represented in dot-decimal notation?

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1  
+1 its a simple and valid question. –  Jim Counts Feb 27 '10 at 18:46
2  
Shortest? .* :-) –  molf Mar 1 '10 at 10:48

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

CPAN is your friend: Regex::Common or Net::IP::Match::Regexp.

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+1 : CPAN IS always your friend for Perl related question. –  David Brunelle Mar 16 '10 at 13:56
if($ip=~/^(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})$/ &&(($1<=255  && $2<=255 && $3<=255  &&$4<=255 )))
 {
     print "valid\n";
 }
 else
 {
     print "Invalid\n";
 }
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3  
dear friend, please recommend Data::Validate::IP from now on. your dear friend. –  xxxxxxx Mar 10 '10 at 7:47
    
@xxxxxxx Why? Tho code is simple enough to be checked. IPv4 will most likely not change and on some environments adding a module dependency is not so trivial. –  Matteo Aug 7 at 14:29

Search CPAN. you can find modules such as Data::Validate::IP for your use

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How do I write a regular expression that matches an IPv4 dotted address?

Long story short: Don't do it ^^.

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For IPv4 in an A.B.C.D (decimal) format, as a one-liner:

(?:(?:[01]?\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.){3}(?:[01]?\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])

If nothing follows the address on the line, it can be contracted to:

(?:(?:[01]?\d?\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])(?:\.|$)){4}

Have fun.

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inet_aton typically handles a lot more formats than just "A.B.C.D", try "ping 10.4" or "ping 0x0a.077.0.4" and see what happens. –  gorilla Feb 27 '10 at 11:41
2  
...which is why the limitation "IPv4 in an A.B.C.D (decimal) format" is clearly stated for those who actually bother to read. :) –  vladr Feb 27 '10 at 20:26
    
Users inputting data don't care about your limitations though. :) –  brian d foy Mar 16 '10 at 13:55
    
Absolutely, one may either have a specific need to support e.g. IPV6 addresses, or run into those users who absolutely positively want to be able to enter non-IPV4 A.B.C.D format IP addresses and still have them pass off as valid, if valid -- but assume for a moment that the highly implicitly stated (via the question tag) "I"m in Perl" assumption was not actually stated. Assume you're validating a form field in Javascript -- you have neither inet_aton nor CPAN to run to the rescue, and maybe you don't want to write a kilometer-long regexp either. :) –  vladr Mar 16 '10 at 17:45
    
And, for the record, you are not qualified to state what planetp's users care or don't care about since you are neither such a user nor are you planetp. :) –  vladr Mar 16 '10 at 23:22

I like this one ... pretty much as Steve Hajducko's but using quoted reg ex which rooooock!

my $ip = '120.140.255.254'; # for example

my $ipno = qr/
    2(?:5[0-5] | [0-4]\d)
    |
    1\d\d
    |
    [1-9]?\d
/x;

if ( $ip =~ /^($ipno\.){3}$ipno$/ ){
    print "IP OK\n";
};

I went for an interview at Arm in Cambridge, UK. They asked me to write one on the board and I wrote some lame one .. and later ... brooding on my poor attempt set out to make a better one. Driven by failure? Or maybe just really irritated by it. I still got the job :)

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Nice one. :) do you mind adding a comment to the various parts for people to understand better? –  Tallmaris Jun 2 '13 at 8:58

If you can leave a perl module behind - then do it.

what about:

if( $ip=~ m/^(\d\d?\d?)\.(\d\d?\d?)\.(\d\d?\d?)\.(\d\d?\d?)/ && 
          ( $1 <= 255 && $2 <= 255 && $3 <= 255 && $4 <= 255 )
) {    
    print "valid IP.";
}
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(?:(?:[01]?\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.){3}(?:[01]?\d{1,2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])

Actually matches some invalid IP addresses, such as:

192.168.00.001

A slightly more refined solution would be:

(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]?\d)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]?\d)$
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Not sure why I don't see this one around anywhere, it's short, concise, and awesome.

([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}
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It's mainly because perl has features for this sort of thing. –  Ivan Nov 29 '12 at 17:23
2  
That'll match 562.93.612.3, which is not an IP. –  Oesor Nov 30 '12 at 14:41

IPv4 ip validation with port number

if ( $ip =~ /(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})\.(\d{1,3})(:(\d{1,5}))?/ )
{
    if( $1 > 255 || $2 > 255 || $3 > 255 || $4 > 255)
    {
        print "invalid ip\n";
        return ;
    }
    if( ( defined $6) && ( $6 > 65536 ))
    {
        print "invalid port\n";
        return ;
    }
    print "valid ip \n";
}
else
{
    print "invalid ip\n";
    return ;
}
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