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I'm wrapping a java.sql.RecordSet inside a java.util.Iterator. My question is, what should I do in case any recordset method throws an SQLException?

The java.util.Iterator javadoc explains which exceptions to throw in various situations (i.e. NoSuchElementException in case you call next() beyond the last element)

However, it doesn't mention what to do when there is an entirely unrelated problem caused by e.g. network or disk IO problems.

Simply throwing SQLException in next() and hasNext() is not possible because it is incompatible with the Iterator interface.

Here is my current code (simplified):

public class MyRecordIterator implements Iterator<Record>
{
    private final ResultSet rs;

    public MyRecordIterator() throws SQLException
    {
        rs = getConnection().createStatement().executeQuery(
                "SELECT * FROM table");         
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext()
    {
        try
        {
            return !rs.isAfterLast();
        }
        catch (SQLException e)
        {
            // ignore, hasNext() can't throw SQLException
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Record next()
    {
        try
        {
            if (rs.isAfterLast()) throw new NoSuchElementException();
            rs.next();
            Record result = new Record (rs.getString("column 1"), rs.getString("column 2")));
            return result;
        }
        catch (SQLException e)
        {
            // ignore, next() can't throw SQLException
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void remove()
    {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Iterator is read-only");
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would wrap the checked exception in an unchecked exception, allowing it to be thrown without breaking Iterator.

I'd suggest an application specific exception extending RuntimeException, implementing the constructor (String, Throwable) so that you can retain access to the cause.

eg.

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
      try {
        return !rs.isAfterLast();
      } catch (SQLException e) {
        throw new MyApplicationException("There was an error", e);
      }
    }

Update: To get started looking for more info, try Googling 'checked unchecked java sqlexception'. Quite a detailed discussion of of checked vs. unchecked exception handling on 'Best Practises for Exception Handling' on onjava.com and discussion with some different approaches on IBM Developerworks.

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. Which exception do you recommend? Is there an accepted practice for this? –  amarillion Feb 27 '10 at 10:26
1  
Hope that helps - you could use an existing RuntimeException subclass like IllegalStateException if you feel it's suitable, I suspect you would want to create your own exception subclass if you wanted to process it further and to make the exception meaningful in the context of your application. –  Brabster Feb 27 '10 at 10:34
    
If the code contains many iterators this might end in banishing checked exceptions. This Java corner seems to be broken by design. –  ceving Jun 25 '13 at 11:08

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