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I'm trying to optimize the following method by having it return only the data my program actually needs for its calculations. In the past the dataset hasn't been that large so I haven't needed to optimize this too much. More recently, my dataset grew from about 30k records to 700k records, so I'm trying to optimize this further.

    public void readRawThresholdsInList(int inputtedESourceID, DateTime maxDateTimeVal, List<int> hashKey)
    {
        log.Info("Reading in raw thresholds from db");
        using (FAI db= new FAI ())
        {
            rawThresholds = (from thr in db.Thresholds
                             where thr.CalculatedDate == maxDateTimeVal
                             where thr.ErrorSourceId == inputtedESourceID
                             where hashKey.Contains(thr.HashKey)
                             select thr).ToList();
        }
        log.Info("Read in " + rawThresholds.Count() + " threshold records for error source id: " + inputtedESourceID + ".");

    }

I got the method to return about 200k rows from 700k by adding the hashKey.Contains(thr.HashKey), but I want to take this one step further by doing the contains on a combination of 2 fields instead of just 1. The catch is that this has to happen on the DB for it to improve my runtimes. There is already post processing that only acts on the rows the program will need.

I want to be able to give the method the following as an input and have the contains (or something similar) act on the new HashKeyHostId object:

public HashKeyHostId{public int hashKey; public int hostId;} 
public void readRawThresholdsInList(int inputtedESourceID, DateTime maxDateTimeVal, List<HashKeyHostId> hashKeyHostIdPairs){
}

There's probably a very simple way of doing this that I'm not thinking of.

Edit:
In response to James's comment - I don't believe this would work. The hashkey variable would now be an object containing pairs of integers instead of just 1 integer. This alone would prevent you from doing a .contains because it's no longer a primitive. It'd be the "public HashKeyHostId{public int hashKey; public int hostId;}" object I posted above. The new requirement is that a hashkey/hostId combo have to match up to 1 record in the DB.

If you're suggesting I do what Janne said (give it a list of hash keys and a list of host ids), I'm fairly certain this would return all results where the hashkey belongs to any of the hostids in the second list (aka, any combination of the two lists). I need it to only return rows with the specified combinations, not combinations of anything in the two lists.

Edit2: Sample dataset: Hashkeys = 100,101,102,103 HostIds = 1,2,3,4,5,6,...,10000

I'd give it a list like

List<HashKeyHostId> data = new List<HashKeyHostId>()
{new HashKeyHostId(100,1),new HashKeyHostId(101,5)}

I believe the query Janne/James are suggesting would return records for any of those combinations (100,1; 100,5; 101,1; 101,5;). I need it to only return records for 100,1 and 101,5.

edit3: I tried doing a where hashkeyHostIdpair.Any(o=> o.hashkey==thr.HashKey && o.hostid==thr.HostId)", but that errored out with the same "Unable to create a constant value of type 'RTM_DB.HashKeyHostId'. Only primitive types are supported in this context." message. It doesnt look like you can do a .Any or a .contains on a list of non-primitive types. I even tried making my own .Any with a where clause and that threw the same exception. (where hashkeyHostIdpair.Where(o=>o.hostid==thr.HostId && o.hashkey==thr.HashKey).Count()>0))

edit4: Per Josh's suggestion I tried this:

rawThresholds=fai.Thresholds.Where(o=>o.CalculatedDate==maxDateTimeVal)
                                            .Where(o=>o.ErrorSourceId==inputtedESourceID)
                                            .Where(o=> hashkeyHostIdpair.Contains(new HashKeyHostId(){ hashkey=o.HashKey, hostid = o.HostId})).ToList();

but it errored out with {System.NotSupportedException: Unable to create a constant value of type 'RTM_DB.HashKeyHostId'. Only primitive types ('such as Int32, String, and Guid') are supported in this context

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3 Answers 3

There's probably a very simple way of doing this that I'm not thinking of.

Yeah, there is

where hashKey.Contains(someValue) && hashKey.Contains(someOtherValue)
share|improve this answer
    
Please see the new edit for why I don't think this would work. –  Migit May 5 '14 at 12:44
    
@Migit I wasn't suggesting you passed hashKey into both Contains calls, you can pass whatever you want in there. The point of my answer was to show you how to use Contains in the context of a multi-property check. The scenario you suggest in your edit, wouldn't you just do hashKey.hashKey.Contains(thr.hashKey) && hashKey.hostId == thr.hostId? –  James May 5 '14 at 12:54
    
Your first hashkey is a list of HashKeyHostId objects. You can't do a .contains on an object and have it translate to SQL. For the .Contains to work with LINQ to SQL, it needs to be a List of primitives. A list of objects you created yourself will error out with: "Unable to create a constant value of type 'RTM_DB.HashKeyHostId'. Only primitive types ('such as Int32, String, and Guid') are supported in this context." –  Migit May 5 '14 at 12:58
    
@Migit sorry, I missed that I assumed that hashKey was going to be a single object. In that case the check just becomes hashKey.Any(x => x.hashKey.Contains(thr.hashKey) && x.hashKey.hostId == thr.hostId)) –  James May 5 '14 at 13:03
    
I'll try that out. In the past I've had lots of issues with .Any though. I'm giving it very large datasets and the .Any likes to error out saying it's nesting too deep –  Migit May 5 '14 at 13:05

Something along this would maybe be what you want to do?

public void readRawThresholdsInList(int inputtedESourceID, DateTime maxDateTimeVal, List<int> hashKeys, List<int> hostIds)
{
    log.Info("Reading in raw thresholds from db");
    using (var db = new FAI())
    {
        var rths = (from thr in db.Thresholds
                    where thr.CalculatedDate == maxDateTimeVal
                    && thr.ErrorSourceId == inputtedESourceID
                    select thr);

        if (hashKeys != null && hashKeys.Count() > 0)
            rths = rths.Where(rth => hashKeys.Contains(rth.HashKey))

        if (hostIds != null && hostIds.Count() > 0)
            rths = rths.Where(rth => hostIds.Contains(rth.HostId)) // FieldName?

        rawThresholds = rths.ToList();
    }
    log.Info("Read in " + rawThresholds.Count() + " threshold records for error source id: " + inputtedESourceID + ".");
}

-- edit --

You could do something like this, but I wouldnt recommend it. Figure out a value which you can multiply the HashKey safely so HostId will always be in the last digits

var filters = new int[] { 100 * 100 + 1 , 101 * 100 + 5 }; // 10001 & 10105

var rths = (from rth in db.Thresholds
        where rth.CalculatedDate == maxDateTimeVal
        && rth.ErrorSourceId == inputtedESourceID
            && filters.Contains(rth.HashKey * 100 + rth.HostId)
            select rth).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
I believe what you're suggesting is the same as what James suggested. I don't think this would work. It needs to be specified combinations of hashkeys and hostids, not any combination of the two. See the new edit. –  Migit May 5 '14 at 12:47
    
Added a workaround which you could use in this particular case because both of your keys are integers. –  Janne Matikainen May 5 '14 at 13:59
    
My hashkeys actually take up the full range of an int32 so I can't use this method directly. I tried casting everything to a double, but apparently there is no linq equivent of Convert.ToDouble() as this is erroring out: where filter.Contains(Convert.ToDouble(thr.ParentErrorSignatureHashKey)*100000.0 + Convert.ToDouble(thr.HostId)) with a System.NotSupportedException exception –  Migit May 5 '14 at 15:03
    
I changed it to where filter.Contains((double)(thr.ParentErrorSignatureHashKey)*100000.0 + (double)(thr.HostId)) and while this does appear be to work, it's taking way too long to run. it's been going for the past 4 minute and it still hasn't returned. If i make a view in the for this field it may go much faster, but I'll wait to see if anyone else has responses before going this route. –  Migit May 5 '14 at 15:08
    
Tried it with Int64s and it also takes more time than without the filtering. –  Migit May 5 '14 at 15:30

If you have something like

List<HashKeyHostId> data = new List<HashKeyHostId>() {
    new HashKeyHostId { hashKey = 100, hostId = 1 },
    new HashKeyHostId { hashKey = 101, hostId = 5 }
}

You can use it in a contains like this:

<somequery>.Where(x => data.Contains(new HashKeyHostId { hashKey = x.HashKey, hostId = x.HostId }))

Note the use of the object initializer syntax instead of a constructor.

This should get translated to SQL with each item in the list being appended to the WHERE clause like:

WHERE ([t0].[HashKey] = @p0 AND [t0].[HostId] = @p1) OR
      ([t0].[HashKey] = @p2 AND [t0].[HostId] = @p3) OR ...
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this fail because HashKeyHostId can't be translated? Or does Contains do something clever that the other methods don't? –  James May 5 '14 at 15:08
    
See edit #4. It failed for the same reasons as the stuff James was suggesting. Janne's suggestion sounded brilliant until I saw the run time :( –  Migit May 5 '14 at 15:26
    
If the type is a POCO and you use the object initializer syntax, the query will understand it as a collection of properties. This could be done with anonymous types too. –  Josh May 5 '14 at 15:28
    
@Migit You must be using EF, not linq to sql. –  Josh May 5 '14 at 15:39
    
well crap. I typoed the %#@* out of that. yea, it's using EF –  Migit May 5 '14 at 15:49

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