Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In tcsh, I have the following script working:

#!/bin/tcsh
setenv X_ROOT /some/specified/path

setenv XDB    ${X_ROOT}/db
setenv PATH   ${X_ROOT}/bin:${PATH}

xrun -d xdb1 -i $1 > $2

My question is, what is the equivalent to the tcsh setenv function in bash? Is there a direct analog? The environment variables are for locating the executable.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

export VAR=value will set VAR to value. Enclose it in single quotes if you want spaces, like export VAR='my val'. If you want the variable to be interpolated, use double quotes, like export VAR="$MY_OTHER_VAR".

share|improve this answer
3  
PS: no need for the double quotes in the last one. The shell does not perform word splitting for variable assignments. –  Jens May 20 '12 at 12:47

The reason people often suggest writing

VAR=value
export VAR

instead of the shorter

export VAR=value

is that the longer form works in more different shells than the short form. If you know you're dealing with bash, either works fine, of course.

share|improve this answer

VAR=value sets VAR to value.

After that export VAR will give it to child processes too.

export VAR=value is a shorthand doing both.

share|improve this answer
2  
doesn't it give it to parent processes, not childs? If a shell script does an export, then the shell I invoked it with has that variable, IIRC. –  rmeador Oct 24 '08 at 19:03
3  
No. "are marked for automatic export to the environment of subsequently executed commands.", meaning child processes executed after the export. –  iny Oct 24 '08 at 19:09
1  
out of curiousity, where is that citation from? –  pbh101 Oct 24 '08 at 21:41
3  
It is from bash command help export. –  iny Oct 25 '08 at 4:00

I think you're looking for export - though I could be wrong.. I've never played with tcsh before. Use the following syntax:

export VARIABLE=value
share|improve this answer

Set an local and environment variable using BASH in Linux

Check for a local or environment variables for a variable called LOL in bash:

el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
el@server /home/el $
el@server /home/el $ env | grep LOL
el@server /home/el $

Sanity check, No local or environment variable called LOL.

Set a local variable called LOL in local, but not environment. So set it:

el@server /home/el $ LOL="so wow much code"
el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
LOL='so wow much code'
el@server /home/el $ env | grep LOL
el@server /home/el $

Variable 'LOL' exists in local variables, but not environment variables. LOL will disappear if you restart the terminal, logout/login or run exec bash.

Set a local variable, then clear out all local variables in bash

el@server /home/el $ LOL="so wow much code"
el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
LOL='so wow much code'
el@server /home/el $ exec bash
el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
el@server /home/el $

You could also just unset the one variable:

el@server /home/el $ LOL="so wow much code"
el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
LOL='so wow much code'
el@server /home/el $ unset LOL
el@server /home/el $ set | grep LOL
el@server /home/el $

Local variable LOL is gone.

Promote a local variable to an environment variable:

el@server /home/el $ DOGE="such variable"
el@server /home/el $ export DOGE
el@server /home/el $ set | grep DOGE
DOGE='such variable'
el@server /home/el $ env | grep DOGE
DOGE=such variable

Note that exporting makes it show up as both a local variable and an environment variable.

Exported Variable DOGE above survives a bash reset:

el@server /home/el $ exec bash
el@server /home/el $ env | grep DOGE
DOGE=such variable
el@server /home/el $ set | grep DOGE
DOGE='such variable'

Unset all environment variables:

You have to pull out a can of Chuck Norris to reset all environment variables without a logout/login:

el@server /home/el $ export CAN="chuck norris"
el@server /home/el $ env | grep CAN
CAN=chuck norris
el@server /home/el $ set | grep CAN
CAN='chuck norris'
el@server /home/el $ env -i bash
el@server /home/el $ set | grep CAN
el@server /home/el $ env | grep CAN

You created an environment variable, then reset the terminal to get rid of them.

Or you could Set and unset an environment variable manually like this:

el@server /home/el $ export FOO="bar"
el@server /home/el $ env | grep FOO
FOO=bar
el@server /home/el $ unset FOO
el@server /home/el $ env | grep FOO
el@server /home/el $
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.