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I want to Select all items in this table :

_categoryRepository.Table :

Id  Name

1   Birthday
2   Christmas
4   Desktops
6   Notebooks
7   Accessories
9   Cell phones

But, . . I want to exclude any 'Id' from _categoryRepository that match 'EventID' in this table :

_MemberEventRepository.Table

Id  MemID   EventID

1   1   1
3   1   2
5   1   7
7   4   1
8   4   4

that matches the MemId. So for MemID '1', the results would be :

4   Desktops
6   Notebooks
9   Cell phones

I don't know how to do this in LINQ.

    var eventsList = from c in _categoryRepository.Table
                    join m in _MemberEventRepository.Table on ?????????????
                    where (m.MemID == currentCustomer)         
                    orderby c.Name
                    select new MyActiveEvents { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name };

This the SQL equivalent :

SELECT [Id] ,[Name]
FROM [Category] 
WHERE Id NOT IN 
(SELECT EventID FROM [Category] c INNER JOIN [MemberEvent] m ON m.[EventID] = c.Id)

Is this possible in LINQ?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using LINQ-to-sql or LINQ-to-entities? Looks more like LINQ-to-sql, but in case of LINQ-to-entites: Are there entity relations defined, e.g. does a Category have a Events navigation property? –  ChrFin May 5 '14 at 14:34
    
"does a Category have a Events navigation property?" No. Can't LINQ-to-sql or LINQ-to-entities both be used? –  Mike Howe May 5 '14 at 14:50
    
In theory they can be used in parallel, but I am not very familiar with LINQ-to-sql as I normaly only use LINQ-to-entities... –  ChrFin May 5 '14 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Should be something like:

var categories = db.Categories
                   .Where(c => db.MemberEvents.Count(e => EventID == c.Id) == 0);

Update - using your LINQ-code-fragment:

var eventsList = from c in _categoryRepository.Table
                 where _MemberEventRepository.Table
                     .Count(m => m.EventID == c.id) == 0       
                 orderby c.Name
                 select new MyActiveEvents { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name }

Instead of Count(...) == 0 it should also be possible to use !Any(...).

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty good chrfin. Worked perfectly. So few lines to do it. I wish I understood LINQ more. Thanks –  Mike Howe May 5 '14 at 15:04
    
I wish I understood LINQ more - I still wish that too ;-)... –  ChrFin May 5 '14 at 15:13

Maybe an except would work? I'm not sure which solution will translate into the most efficient sql.

var eventsList = (from c in _categoryRepository.Table
                  orderby c.Name
                  select new MyActiveEvents { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name })
                 .Except(
                from c in _categoryRepository.Table
                join m in _MemberEventRepository.Table on c.Id equals m.EventID
                where (m.MemID == currentCustomer)         
                select new MyActiveEvents { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name });
share|improve this answer
    
"which solution will translate into the most efficient sql" . . I'm more concerned about getting the job done at this point. Both solutions worked. I understand yours much more, but would like to learn more LINQ because I'm sure it would makes things easier in the end. Thanks –  Mike Howe May 5 '14 at 16:18

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