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I am trying to learn about when and where the constructors are called in the code.

I made my own, simple though, stringclass that has these possibilities:

 String string1("hello world");


 string1 = "Hello march!!!";

Concerning the latter one, these two constructors where called in the String-class Called in order...

 converting-constructor

 copy-constructor

I can understand why the copy-constructor is called not really why the converting-constructor is called?

Here are these two constructors:

converting-constructor

 String::String(const char* ch) : _strPtr(0) {

   _strLen = strlen(ch) + 1;
   _strPtr = new char[_strLen];
   strncpy(_strPtr, ch, _strLen);
   _strPtr[_strLen - 1] = '\0';
   cout << "konverterings-constructor\n";
 }

copy-constructor

 String::String(const String& string) {

   _strLen = strlen(string._strPtr) + 1; // behöver ingen "djup-kopia" av vektorlängden.
   if(string.getString()) {
       _strPtr = new char[_strLen];
       strncpy(_strPtr, string._strPtr, _strLen);
       _strPtr[_strLen - 1] = '\0'; // null-terminering
   } else {
       _strPtr = 0;
   }
   cout << "copy-constructor\n";
}

overloading member-function of assignment-operator

 String String::operator=(const String& string) {

   if (this == &string) { // kontrollera om objektet är lika med sig självt.
       return *this;
   }
   cout << "......\n";
   delete [] getString(); 

   _strLen = strlen(string.getString()) + 1;
   if(string.getString()) {
         _strPtr = new char[getLength()];
        strncpy(_strPtr, string.getString(), _strLen);
        _strPtr[_strLen - 1] = '\0'; // null-terminering
   } else {
       _strPtr = 0;
   }

  return *this;
}
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Can you explain how you would expect this to work without calling the conversion constructor? –  hvd May 5 at 14:53
    
Did you implement an assignment operator? If so, what is the parameter type? –  kec May 5 at 14:54
2  
Okay, the conversion is to convert the string literal. The copy is the return from your assignment operator. You should return by ref. –  kec May 5 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

I can understand why the copy-constructor is called not really why the converting-constructor is called?

The converting constructor is called because when you assign, since you don't have an assignment operator that takes const char*, a temporary String is constructed from the RHS using the converting constructor, and used to assign to the LHS.

Note that the copy is down to the fact that your assignment operator returns by value. This is unusual for an assignment operator. Usually these return a reference.

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Wouldn't that call the implicit assignment operator rather than the copy ctor? –  kec May 5 at 14:54
    
@kec Yes, but the converting constructor is needed to construct a String that can be assigned from. –  juanchopanza May 5 at 14:54
    
I made a update –  user2991252 May 5 at 14:55
    
@juanchopanza: Yes, but that doesn't explain the copy constructor. The answer is in the return from the assignment, it seems. –  kec May 5 at 14:57
    
@kec OP is not asking about the copy constructor, but yes, that explains the copy. –  juanchopanza May 5 at 15:03

Okay, first the array of const chars (which is the type of the string literal) decays to a pointer to const char. Then the converting ctor is called to construct a String from a const char *. Then copy ctor is called to construct a String in the return from your assignment operator. You should return by non-const reference to be idiomatic.

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