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I have a data frame in the format:

head(subset)
# ants  0 1 1 0 1 
# age   1 2 2 1 3
# lc    1 1 0 1 0

I need to create new data frame with random samples according to age and lc. For example I want 30 samples from age:1 and lc:1, 30 samples from age:1 and lc:0 etc. I did look at random sampling method like;

newdata<- function(subset, age, 30)

But it is not the code that I want.

Thanks in advance !

share|improve this question

Here's some data:

set.seed(1)
n <- 1e4
d <- data.frame(age = sample(1:5,n,TRUE), 
                lc = rbinom(n,1,.5),
                ants = rbinom(n,1,.7))

You want a split-apply-combine strategy, where you split your data.frame (d in this example), sample rows/observations from each subsample, and then combine then back together with rbind. Here's how it works:

sp <- split(d, list(d$age, d$lc))
samples <- lapply(sp, function(x) x[sample(1:nrow(x), 30, FALSE),])
out <- do.call(rbind, samples)

The result:

> str(out)
'data.frame':   300 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ age : int  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ lc  : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ ants: int  1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
> head(out)
         age lc ants
1.0.2242   1  0    1
1.0.4417   1  0    1
1.0.389    1  0    0
1.0.4578   1  0    1
1.0.8170   1  0    1
1.0.5606   1  0    1
share|improve this answer
    
that's what I want to do. I did try split and lapply functions, but r gives an exceed memory error. Is there other way to do it for huge dataset? thanks – user3525533 May 7 '14 at 19:54
    
@user3525533 How big is your dataset? – Thomas May 7 '14 at 19:58
    
its around 2gb. I have 30 variables and 16826950 obs. in my data frame though. When I use split function, it gives a memory error. – user3525533 May 7 '14 at 21:17
    
Sorry, it's setDT(d)[d[, sample(.I, 30L, FALSE), by="age,lc"]$V1] – Arun May 8 '14 at 2:48
    
@Thomas;it will be faster to sample the row indices rather than rows - a lot faster if there are many columns / rows. sp <- split(seq_len(nrow(d)), list(d$age, d$lc)) ; samples <- lapply(sp, sample, 30) ; d[unlist(samples), ] – user20650 Aug 26 '15 at 11:38

See the function strata from the package sampling. The function selects stratified simple random sampling and gives a sample as a result. Extra two columns are added - inclusion probabilities (Prob) and strata indicator (Stratum). See the example.

require(data.table)
require(sampling)

set.seed(1)
n <- 1e4
d <- data.table(age = sample(1:5, n, T), 
                lc = rbinom(n, 1 , .5),
                ants = rbinom(n, 1, .7))

# Sort
setkey(d, age, lc)

# Population size by strata
d[, .N, keyby = list(age, lc)]

# Select sample
set.seed(2)
s <- data.table(strata(d, c("age", "lc"), rep(30, 10), "srswor"))

# Sample size by strata
s[, .N, keyby = list(age, lc)]
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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – Jongware May 7 '14 at 22:31
    
@Jongware, see the updated answer. Thanks for the comment! – djhurio May 8 '14 at 5:50
    
What if I want to split a dataset into two "equal" groups based on two or three variables? – BlackHat Jun 30 '15 at 21:35
    
@user3116753, this seems to be out of scope question. Please define it as a new question. – djhurio Jul 1 '15 at 8:34
    
Not needed anymore. Used K-means achieve this – BlackHat Jul 1 '15 at 12:33

I would suggest using either stratified from my "splitstackshape" package, or sample_n from the "dplyr" package:

## Sample data
set.seed(1)
n <- 1e4
d <- data.table(age = sample(1:5, n, T), 
                lc = rbinom(n, 1 , .5),
                ants = rbinom(n, 1, .7))
# table(d$age, d$lc)

For stratified, you basically specify the dataset, the stratifying columns, and an integer representing the size you want from each group OR a decimal representing the fraction you want returned (for example, .1 represents 10% from each group).

library(splitstackshape)
set.seed(1)
out <- stratified(d, c("age", "lc"), 30)
head(out)
#    age lc ants
# 1:   1  0    1
# 2:   1  0    0
# 3:   1  0    1
# 4:   1  0    1
# 5:   1  0    0
# 6:   1  0    1

table(out$age, out$lc)
#    
#      0  1
#   1 30 30
#   2 30 30
#   3 30 30
#   4 30 30
#   5 30 30

For sample_n you first create a grouped table (using group_by) and then specify the number of observations you want. If you wanted proportional sampling instead, you should use sample_frac.

library(dplyr)
set.seed(1)
out2 <- d %>%
  group_by(age, lc) %>%
  sample_n(30)

# table(out2$age, out2$lc)
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