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I need to use sed to convert all occurences of ##XXX## to ${XXX}. X could be any alphabetic character or '_'. I know that I need to use something like:

's/##/\${/g'

But of course that won't properly, as it will convert ##FOO## to ${FOO${

Any takers? - Don

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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's a shot at a better replacement regex:

's/##\([a-zA-Z_]\+\)##/${\1}/g'

Or if you assume exactly three characters :

's/##\([a-zA-Z_]\{3\}\)##/${\1}/g'
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You need to escape the \( and \) –  user24881 Oct 24 '08 at 18:50
    
You've doubled the close brace }. –  wnoise Oct 24 '08 at 18:51
    
Fixed those, thanks! –  postfuturist Oct 24 '08 at 18:54
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  • Encapsulate the alpha and '_' within '\(' and '\)' and then in the right side reference that with '\1'.
  • '+' to match one or more alpha and '_' (in case you see ####).
  • Add the 'g' option to the end to replace all matches (which I'm guessing is what you want to do in this case).
's/##\([a-zA-Z_]\+\)##/${\1}/g'
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+ is not a standard operator in sed -- maybe in GNU sed. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '08 at 18:52
    
And there was no mention of digits. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '08 at 18:52
    
Yes, + is an operator in GNU sed, not maybe. –  postfuturist Oct 24 '08 at 19:12
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Use this:

s/##\([^#]*\)##/${\1}/

BTW, there is no need to escape $ in the right side of the "s" operator.

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The [^#] is not an accurate match for a string of "any alphabetic character or '_'". –  postfuturist Oct 24 '08 at 18:46
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sed 's/##\([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_]\)##/${\1}/'

The \(...\) remembers...and is referenced as \1 in the expansion. Use single quotes to save your sanity.

As noted in the comments below this, this can also be contracted to:

sed 's/##\([a-zA-Z_]\{3\}\)##/${\1}/'

This answer assumes that the example wanted exactly three characters matched. There are multiple variations depending on what is in between the hash marks. The key part is remembering part of the matched string.

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You are assuming exactly three characters between the hash marks. Even so, you could collapse that by turning [a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_] into [a-zA-Z_]{3} . –  postfuturist Oct 24 '08 at 18:49
    
Yes ... or '\{3\}', –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '08 at 18:54
    
And the question does just request 3 'X'; I agree that it could be clearer whether the characters in between can be variable in number. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '08 at 18:54
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echo '##XXX##' | sed "s/^##([^#]*)/##${\1}/g"

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echo '##XXX##' | sed "s/^##([^#]*)/##$\{\1\}/g" –  Ton Mar 17 '09 at 17:47
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sed 's/([^a-z][^A-Z][^0-9]*)/(&)/pg

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It is wrong.It doesn't give the valid answer what he expected.read the question carefully. –  sat Sep 27 '12 at 9:19
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