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In Ruby, I can define a method foo=(bar):

irb(main):001:0> def foo=(bar)
irb(main):002:1>   p "foo=#{bar}"
irb(main):003:1> end
=> nil

Now I'd like to check if it has been defined,

irb(main):004:0> defined?(foo=)
SyntaxError: compile error
(irb):4: syntax error, unexpected ')'
 from (irb):4
 from :0

What is the proper syntax to use here? I assume there must be a way to escape "foo=" such that it is parsed and passed correctly to the defined? operator.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The problem is that the foo= method is designed to be used in assignments. You can use defined? in the following way to see what's going on:

defined? self.foo=()
#=> nil
defined? self.foo = "bar"
#=> nil

def foo=(bar)
end

defined? self.foo=()
#=> "assignment"
defined? self.foo = "bar"
#=> "assignment"

Compare that to:

def foo
end

defined? foo
#=> "method"

To test if the foo= method is defined, you should use respond_to? instead:

respond_to? :foo=
#=> false

def foo=(bar)
end

respond_to? :foo=
#=> true
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Thanks! This solves my problem. I'm still curious to know if there's a way to escape foo= such that it can be fed to defined? but at least now I can move on. –  Alex Boisvert Feb 27 '10 at 19:24
1  
The problem here is that foo= is always used in assignments, so Ruby will return "assignment" if you test for defined? foo() (see updated answer). –  molf Feb 27 '10 at 19:40

You can check if a method exists by using the respond_to? method, and you pass it a symbol, e.g. bar.respond_to?(:foo=) to see if the object bar has a method foo=. If you want to know if instances of a class respond to a method you can use method_defined? on the class (or module), e.g. Foo.method_defined?(:bar=).

defined? isn't a method, but an operator which returns a description of the operand (or nil if it is not defined, which is why it can be used in an if statement). The operand can be any expression, i.e. a constant, a variable, an assignment, a method, a method call, etc. The reason why it doesn't work when you do defined?(foo=) is because of the parentheses, skip them and it should work more or less as expected. That being said, defined? is a pretty weird operator, and no one uses it to test for the existence of methods.

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It is respond_to?, not responds_to? –  0x4a6f4672 Jul 30 '12 at 15:42
1  
Ah, the spelling of Ruby core library... respond_to?, start_with?, end_with?. –  Theo Jul 31 '12 at 10:00

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