Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm programming a C/C++ client/server sockets application. At this point, the client connects itselfs to the server every 50ms and sends a message.

Everything seems to works, but the data flow is not continuous: Suddenly, the server doesn't receives anything more, and then 5 messages at once... And sometimes everything works...

Has someone an idea of the origin of this strange behaviour ?

Some part of the code:

Client:

while (true)
{
if (SDL_GetTicks()-time>=50)
{
socket = new socket();
socket->write("blah");
message.clear();
message = socket->read();
socket->close();
delete socket;
time=SDL_GetTicks();
}
}

Server:

while (true) {
fd_set readfs;
struct timeval timeout={0,0};
FD_ZERO(&readfs);
FD_SET(sock, &readfs);
select(sock + 1, &readfs, NULL, NULL, &timeout)
if(FD_ISSET(sock, &readfs))
{
SOCKADDR_IN csin;
socklen_t crecsize = sizeof csin;
SOCKET csock = accept(sock, (SOCKADDR *) &csin, &crecsize);
sock_err = send(csock, buffer, 32, 0);
closesocket(csock);
}
}

Edits: 1. I tried to do

int flag = 1;
setsockopt(socket, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_NODELAY, &flag, sizeof flag);

In both client and server, but the problem is still there.

2.Yes those connections/deconnections are very inneficient, but when I try to write

socket = new socket();
while (true)
{
if (SDL_GetTicks()-time>=50)
{
socket->write("blah");
message.clear();
message = socket->read();
time=SDL_GetTicks();
}
}

Then the message is only sent once (or received)...

Finally:

I had forgotten to apply TCP_NODELAY to the client socket on the server side. Now it works perfectly ! I put the processes in threads so that the sockets keep open. Thank you all :)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is what called "Nagle delay". This algorithm is waiting on TCP stack for more data to arrive before actually sending anything to network untill some timeout expires. So you should modify the Nagle timeout (http://fourier.su/index.php?topic=249.0) or disable Nagle delay at all (http://www.unixguide.net/network/socketfaq/2.16.shtml), so data will be sent per send call.

share|improve this answer
    
I am always fascinated by the knowledge of people here. Thank you very much. I will try that in a while :) –  Klaus Feb 27 '10 at 19:08
    
+1 for pointing to the concept involved. –  N 1.1 Feb 27 '10 at 19:37
    
See my answer above. –  Klaus Feb 27 '10 at 21:54
    
@alemjerus: the fourier.su link is not working anymore.. –  duedl0r Mar 24 at 11:54

As others already replied the delays you see are due to TCP built-in Nagle algorithm, which can be disabled by setting TCP_NODELAY socket option.

I would like to point you to the fact that your socket communications are very inefficient due to constant connects and disconnects. Every time client connects to the server there's the three way handshake that takes place, and connection tear-down requires four packets to complete. Basically you lose most of the benefits of TCP but incur all of its drawbacks.

It would be much more efficient for each client to maintain persistent connection to the server. select(2), or even better, epoll(4) on Linux, or kqueue(2) on FreeBSD and Mac, are very convenient frameworks for handling IO on multiple sockets.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not just the handshake and teardowns, but every time you form a new connection you get to go through slow-start again. –  ephemient Feb 27 '10 at 21:11
    
Yep, that too. Thanks. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 27 '10 at 21:28
    
See my answer above. –  Klaus Feb 27 '10 at 21:54
2  
@Klaus, you need to make those changes on both sides, not just client. As is the server closes each connection after first read. Also, TCP does not guarantee a single write to the socket to correspond to a single read on the other side. Both are usually done in a loop. Then your application protocol needs to validate the bytes received. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 27 '10 at 22:02

You can use TCP_NODELAY socket option to force the data sending immediately.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.