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Given the following class:

class Test
  attr_accessor :name
end

When I create the object, I want to do the following:

t = Test.new {Name = 'Some Test Object'}

At the moment it results in name being nil still. Is this possible?

Note: I don't want to add an initializer.

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Ruling out an initialize method (is that what you meant?) makes things difficult. When creating new Test objects, should name get the same initialization each time? Or should it get a value specified in open code? –  DigitalRoss Feb 27 '10 at 19:29
2  
Motivation would be to do something similar to C# - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384062.aspx –  Ben Hall Feb 27 '10 at 23:27
    
Is there something you doesn't like with the solution which I'm proposing ? –  Nicolas Guillaume Feb 28 '10 at 14:57
    
No, I do like it but you need to add an initialize step to the actual class. If you look at how C# does it, then it's a language feature and works against any C# class. What happens if I already have an initialize step? What if it's from a external lib? –  Ben Hall Mar 4 '10 at 0:09
    
@Ben did you ever find a solution to this? I am also after something like the C# object initializer –  Schneider Feb 16 '12 at 3:44

7 Answers 7

ok,

I came up with a solution. It uses the initialize method but on the other hand do exactly what you want.

class Test
  attr_accessor :name

  def initialize(init)
    init.each_pair do |key, val|
      instance_variable_set('@' + key.to_s, val)
    end
  end

  def display
    puts @name
  end

end

t = Test.new :name => 'hello'
t.display

happy ? :)


Alternative solution using inheritance. Note, with this solution, you don't need to explicitly declare the attr_accessor!

class CSharpStyle
  def initialize(init)
    init.each_pair do |key, val|
      instance_variable_set('@' + key.to_s, val)
      instance_eval "class << self; attr_accessor :#{key.to_s}; end"
    end
  end
end

class Test < CSharpStyle
  def initialize(arg1, arg2, *init)
    super(init.last)
  end
end

t = Test.new 'a val 1', 'a val 2', {:left => 'gauche', :right => 'droite'}
puts "#{t.left} <=> #{t.right}"
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As mentioned by others, the easiest way to do this would be to define an initialize method. If you don't want to do that, you could make your class inherit from Struct.

class Test < Struct.new(:name)
end

So now:

>> t = Test.new("Some Test Object")
=> #<struct Test name="Some Test Object">
>> t.name
=> "Some Test Object"
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There is a general way of doing complex object initialization—passing block with necessary actions. This block could be evaluated in context of the object, so you have easy access to all instance variables, methods etc.

Continuing your example

class Test
  attr_accessor :name

  def initialize(&block)
    instance_eval(&block)
  end 
end

and then

t = Test.new { @name = 'name' }

or

t = Test.new do
  self.name = 'name'
  # other initialization, if needed
end

Note that this way does not require complex changing of initialize method (which is, in fact, one-liner).

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The code you're indicating is passing parameters into the initialize function. You will most definitely have to either use initialize, or use a more boring syntax:

test = Test.new
test.name = 'Some test object'
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Would need to subclass Test (here shown with own method and initializer) e.g.:

class Test
  attr_accessor :name, :some_var

  def initialize some_var
    @some_var = some_var
  end

  def some_function
    "#{some_var} calculation by #{name}"
  end
end

class SubClassedTest < Test
  def initialize some_var, attrbs
    attrbs.each_pair do |k,v|
      instance_variable_set('@' + k.to_s, v)
    end
    super(some_var)
  end
end

tester = SubClassedTest.new "some", name: "james"
puts tester.some_function

outputs: some calculation by james

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You could do this.

class Test
   def not_called_initialize(but_act_like_one)
        but_act_like_one.each_pair do |variable,value|
            instance_variable_set('@' + variable.to_s, value)
            class << self
                    self
            end.class_eval do
                    attr_accessor variable
            end
        end
   end
end

(t = Test.new).not_called_initialize :name => "Ashish", :age => 33
puts t.name #=> Ashish
puts t.age  #=> 33

One advantage is that you don't even have to define your instance variables upfront using attr_accessor. You could pass all the instance variables you need through not_called_initialize method and let it create them besides defining the getters and setters.

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If you don't want to override initialize then you'll have to move up the chain and override new. Here's an example:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :bar, :baz

  def self.new(*args, &block)
    allocate.tap do |instance|
      if args.last.is_a?(Hash)
        args.last.each_pair do |k,v|
          instance.send "#{k}=", v
        end
      else
        instance.send :initialize, *args
      end
    end
  end

  def initialize(*args)
    puts "initialize called with #{args}"
  end
end

If the last thing you pass in is a Hash it will bypass initialize and call the setters immediately. If you pass anything else in it will call initialize with those arguments.

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